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Robert

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  1. Robert

    2019 CPL All-Star game.

    Personally, I would like to see a CPL All-star game after the season has concluded, featuring the 2919 CPL champions versus a team of players selected from the six remaining clubs. This would; 1) avoid interfering with any league matches, 2) be played when interest in the CPL is at its highest, 3) and be truly representative of the best players based on their overall performance during the entire season.
  2. Robert

    2019 CPL All-Star game.

    Well, it looks like the half-time entertainment show has been looked after!
  3. Robert

    2019 CPL All-Star game.

  4. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    I wonder if the club's unusual name contributed to its very short existence of one season. The Pioneers' owner, Earl Himes, sure seemed like an interesting character, judging by the following: The owner in Ottawa is Earl Himes, who knows little of the grand old game. He has a head for business, however, and he quickly passed on Lansdowne Stadium and moved to a little park across the Quebec border in Aylmer. The town gave him 51 per cent of the park plus concession rights for the privilege of having a team in a national league. Himes will learn all about soccer. Earl McRae, Citizen sports columnist.The Citizen; Ottawa, Ont. 11 Sep 1986: E1. Earl Himes doesn't look nuts or sound nuts and all indicators, until now, suggest he hasn't been nuts. He's 5l years old and runs his own business, Sports Graphics, in Vanier. It must be doing OK because Earl Himes has just bought a team in the new professional Canadian Soccer League which, if not nuts, does imply suicidal tendencies. Equally disturbing is that Earl Himes knows next to nothing about soccer; but this does not necessarily disqualify him from owning a sporting franchise. Harold Ballard, after all, owns the Toronto Maple Leafs. "I'll admit I don't know much about the game," says Earl Himes. "It was just a couple of weeks ago I learned the offside rule. It's not like in hockey, you know. And I'm still not sure what those cards mean that the referee holds up. I think the yellow one is a penalty, isn't it? Or is that the red one?" Naturally, the question must be asked: What in the name of almighty God possessed Earl Himes to spend $27,000 to land a franchise in a sport he knows from nothing, toss in a $l00,000 performance bond and agree to a $250,000 annual budget? Bloodlines. "My nine-year-old grandson Corey plays soccer," says Himes. "He just loves the game and I've gone out to watch him. It looks exciting as hell. Then I found out about 20,000 people from kids to adults are playing soccer in and around Ottawa, they have brothers and sisters and grandparents and aunts and uncles; the future looked promising as an investment." For his sake, I wish Earl Himes luck. For my sake, I hope I'm spared. I do not understand a sport where a 2-0 score is considered a blowout; where a bonus clause for goals scored could earn a player enough to buy a pair of underwear at K Mart; where the goalie could leave the game, take in a movie downtown, return and not have been missed. I do think I know what that yellow card says. "Stop trying to score goals, you idiot, this is soccer." I am not alone. In his book Travels In Hyper Reality the Italian essayist Umberto Eco recalls the time his father took him to a soccer match: "And one day, as I was observing with detachment the senseless movements down there on the field, I felt how the high noonday sun seemed to enfold men and things in a chilling light and how, before my eyes, a cosmic, meaningless performance was proceeding ... for the first time, I doubted the existence of God and decided that the world was a pointless fiction." Or, as Liz Taylor also put it: "I prefer rugby to soccer. When soccer players start biting each other's ears off again, I'll like it better." None of which deters Earl Himes. "I'm in this to entertain the fans and make money and I will accomplish both." Echoes of Phil Woosnam, ex-commissioner of the North American Soccer League which also once believed the colonials were ready for The World's Most Popular Sport. It spent a fortune on exotic holy persons only to find there were more seats than fans watching the exotic holy persons - the league flamed out last year in The World's Most Impressive Bankruptcy. Welcome to the boneyard of broken dreams: the National Lacrosse League, died at 2 - $6 million in losses. The World Football League, died at 2 - $30 million in losses. The United States Football League, died at 3 - losses still being counted. So why should the Canadian Soccer League not fill the next plot? Common sense, it says. It will not succumb on the funeral pyre of greed and bad management. While there is no limit on team capitalization (anywhere from $250,000 to $700,000), there is a limit on individual salaries ($25,000). "Otherwise," says Earl Himes, "a guy like Peter Pocklington, who owns the Edmonton franchise, could wipe me out with one paycheque." Each of the initial eight clubs will be allowed two foreign players the first season, three the second. "Obviously," says Bill Gilhespy, interim league chairman, "they won't be major stars, but they will be talented players on top clubs who like to play soccer in the European off-season." Rule changes to enhance goal scoring? "No, but there will be a directive to play attacking soccer." An all-important television contract? "We are in negotiations; TSN is interested. We're hopeful, but each club is prepared to lose money the first few years. They had to agree to that possibility as part of acceptance." Earl Himes agreed but doesn't plan for it to happen. "I need to sell 2,000 season tickets at $l00 each to break even and I'll do it the first year, l987," he says. "For that price, you get to take a child as well. I'm gonna market the hell out of my team. My firm'll put out posters, bumper stickers and educational brochures. We'll have give-aways, we'll have big ads in the paper, we'll have clinics at the schools, we'll have fan clubs. We'll allow no beer, just clean family entertainment. The interest is there, I know it'll work." Even if he doesn't know soccer. National Capital Pioneers seek new owners in effort to stay alive. Lofaro, Tony.The Ottawa Citizen; Ottawa, Ont. 8 Oct 1987: D3. An as yet unformed ownership group is expected to take over Ottawa's pro soccer franchise which has been in limbo since the end of the regular season. Kevan Pipe, executive director of the Canadian Soccer Association and Bill Thomson, coach of the National Capital Pioneers, are looking for prospective owners for the Ottawa franchise. The Canadian Soccer League announced Wednesday it had assumed ownership of the National Capital Pioneers Sept. 4 from Earl Himes, an Ottawa businessman. Pipe said the new ownership group will have to pay an initial $10,000 to secure the franchise rights to the team and also come up with an additional $65,000 in credit by the end of the year. Contacted at his office Wednesday afternoon, Himes wouldn't comment on the new development. "Mr. Himes has no association with the Ottawa franchise," said Dale Barnes, Canadian Soccer League commissioner. The league has operated the franchise since the change in ownership. A lack of promotion and marketing certainly hurt the Pioneers, said Pipe. "We know the fans are there, it is just a matter of cultivating them and doing some aggressive marketing." Ottawa lawyer Pat Santini said Himes signed a legal document Sept. 4 which transferred the team back to the league. The league and the new owners are not responsible for any outstanding debts which may have occurred during the season, he said. Declan McEvoy, executive director of Aydelu Inc. in Aylmer, confirmed there were unpaid debts left at the end of last season, but he would not say the amount owed. The Pioneers played its home games at Aydelu Park in Aylmer. "I can tell you there will be definitely be a team in Ottawa next year and it will be a fresh new start," said Pipe. He said the ownership group is still in the "embryonic stage" and will have to look at various options, especially whether the team should be run as a non-profit community operation. Two of the more successful teams in the Canadian Soccer League, Vancouver and Winnipeg, are community-owned, Pipe said.
  5. Robert

    2019 CPL All-Star game.

    Does anyone know when and where the 2019 CPL All-Star game is going to be played? Does the CPL intend to showcase its star players? Can the CPL afford to pass-up the opportunity to promoting its product?
  6. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    Stinson, Dan.The Vancouver Sun; Vancouver, B.C. 19 Sep 1987: H3. Vancouver 86ers' midfielder Jim Easton Jr. was voted to the first all-star team and Buzz Parsons was named general manager of the year in press balloting for the Canadian Soccer League's top on- and off-the-field personnel, announced Friday. Easton, 22, the son of the Vancouver Whitecaps' first head coach, was the only 86ers' player voted to the all-star squad. Parsons is a former Whitecaps' player who has just completed his first year as the 86ers' g.m. Other players named to the all-star team include: Goalkeeper Sven Habermann (Calgary Kickers); defenders Greg Kern (Calgary), Paul James (Hamilton Steelers), Randy Ragan (Toronto Blizzard) and Diego Castello (Edmonton Brick Men); midfielders Zeljo Adzic (Hamilton) and Ray Hudson (Edmonton); forwards Nick Gilbert (Calgary), Ed McNally (Ottawa National Capital Pioneers) and Billy Domazetis (Hamilton). The reserve all-star team includes goalkeeper Don Ferguson (Ottawa) and substitutes David Norman (Winnipeg Fury), Han Kim (Winnipeg) and Zoltan Meszaros (North York Rockets).
  7. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    I hope you're right. Would I bet any money it? ... I don't need to answer that, do I?
  8. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    If as some of the earlier replies in this thread are correct in predicting that the CPL's inaugural match is going to be the highest attended match this season, which means it all downhill from there. That kind of momentum will undoubtedly lead to the following: Keating, Jack.The Province; Vancouver, B.C. 26 Nov 1992: B4. The Canadian Soccer League may not operate in 1993. After six years of operation, the financially-strapped CSL is considering whether to disband for the '93 season. The league will convene a meeting Dec. 9 in Toronto to ponder its shaky future and one of the options it's considering is to take a one-year leave of absence much like a handful of teams in the CSL have done in the league's six-year history. Unfortunately, all those teams that took a so-called one-year leave of absence - Calgary Strikers, Edmonton Brick Men, Ottawa Intrepid, Hamilton Steelers, Kitchener Kickers, Nova Scotia Clippers, Victoria Vistas - never resurfaced. "Dec.9 is the day we either go ahead or stay behind. Stay behind means just take a year out and regroup again," said CSL vice- president Tony Fontana Wednesday after convening a "disappointing" conference call with the five remaining teams that was supposed to decide their future. Fontana, said it's uncertain whether the CSL will operate next year. "We have a very big problem with the recession," said Fontana, who is also owner of the North York Rockets. "So soccer is the first to suffer. These (CSL) people are nearly bankrupt, all of them. We are in a very bad financial pinch." Fontana says it costs $300,0000 to operate a CSL franchise. Citing the fact CSL teams couldn't commit for the '93 season, the Vancouver 86ers left the league in October to join the American Professional Soccer League. The Toronto Blizzard officially applied to the APSL Tuesday while the Montreal Supra are also considering the American option. The CSL began its first season in 1987 with eight teams, expanding to a high of 11 teams in 1990. Six teams - Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montreal, North York, and London competed in 1992. Fontana said that an expansion group from Burnaby/Coquitlam will be part of the CSL in '93 if the league operates. A Kelowna bid was withdrawn after being unable to post a $25,000 bond, said Fontana.
  9. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    LEST WE FORGET For those who fail to understand the point behind this thread, the hope is to avoid a repeat of the following scenario (once in a lifetime is enough): The Canadian Soccer League officially salvaged the London franchise for the 1992 CSL season Tuesday. The London Lasers, who were attempting to return to the CSL after a one-year leave of absence, were on the verge of folding because of financial difficulties until Tuesday's 11th-hour intervention by the league and the Canadian Soccer Association., Under the agreement, the five other CSL teams will "subsidize" the team financially while the CSA will provide the bulk of the players from Canada's under-20 national team. Paul James, who has played the last five seasons in the CSL, was named the playing coach of the Lasers. The 28-year-old James, who played for Canada at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, played 27 games for the Toronto Blizzard last season. He was a player/coach with Ottawa of the CSL in 1989. 86ers general manager/coach Bob Lenarduzzi supports the CSL/CSA partnership to save London. "The five CSL teams are committed to putting some funding towards London along with the assistance of the CSA," said Lenarduzzi. Lenarduzzi said the funding to save London will come out of the five other team's existing league fees, which is $65,000 per team. London's return gives the CSL six teams for the 1992 season. League play begins Sunday.
  10. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    Canadian Soccer League (Match #6) Sunday, June 14, 1987 - Ivor Wynne Stadium, Hamilton, Ontario - Attendance 4,500 Hamilton Steelers ---- 2 (Zeljko Adzic, Bill Domazetis) Toronto Blizzard ------ 1 (Luis Lufi)
  11. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    Canadian Soccer League (Match #5) Sunday, June 14, 1987 - Aydelu Park, Aylmer, Quebec - Attendance 2,200 National Capital Pioneers -- 3 (John Roumelis, Ed McNally, Mark Purdy) North York Rockets --------- 1 (Zoltan Meszaros)
  12. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    This of course is the big dilemma for the CanPL. Throughout the six-year existence of the CSL, the Winnipeg Fury proved to be one of the only solid franchises, in spite of starting with an all-amateur roster that included the following (based on the cover of a Fury program shown above): Jeff Cambridge, Chris Harris, Joe Poplawski, Daniel Courtois, Han Kim, Neil Munro, Jim Zinko, Tony Nocita, Des Clarke,Alex Bustos, Chico Andrade, Paul Clarke, John Berti, Dave Knock and Mike Conway. Recognize any names? Not exactly household names. To me resembles the rosters of most of this year's CanPL teams. Therefore, if you are going to launch an entire league comprised entirely of non-drawing-name players, then how do you expect to develop and improve these players without experienced professionals playing alongside and against them?
  13. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    It seems this story had a sad ending: High flier owes millions in taxes 00:00 EST Friday, April 04, 1986 Inex Technologies Inc. was created by Edward Cavalier in 1984. Within a year, the company stunned the computer industry as it obtained millions through the SRTC program, bought expensive buildings and condominiums, acquired state-of-the-art equipment and lured top professionals on to its staff with high salaries and such perks as expensive cars. Mr. Cavalier, who had a net worth of only $50 and narrowly escaped bankruptcy only a year before he created Inex, moved into a $300,000 condominium, began driving a $55,000 Lotus Turbo Esprit car and sponsored the Inex Canada soccer team. Today, Mr. Cavalier, 27, has traded in the Lotus for a cheaper Audi, the soccer team no longer exists, and the young entrepreneur is scrambling to find cash to keep Inex alive. He has tried unsuccessfully to raise capital in North America and Europe. The Department of National Revenue has registered a $35,234,441 lien on the company's four-story building on Church Street in Toronto and on two business condominiums Inex owns on Carlton Street. The Church Street building was bought for $3.6-million and the condominiums, which occupy two floors of an office block, were bought for $7.8-million. The building and the condominiums are now for sale. Staff at Inex has been drastically reduced, both by firings and the loss of employees to other jobs. One office condominium is empty. The other is rented out. Mr. Cavalier could not be reached for comment and nobody else at Inex was willing to be interviewed yesterday. Meanwhile, Mr. Cavalier's older brother, Claude, has filed two mechanic's liens on the Inex properties, saying the company owes him $431,922 for work he did remodelling the properties. "Brothers are brothers, but business is business," Claude Cavalier said, adding that he faces bankruptcy if Inex does not pay him. Claude Cavalier incorporated a contracting company, Matrix Development Corp., when his brother said he could do the remodelling if he wanted to. According to court documents, Inex was to pay Matrix $1,940,602 to remodel the Church Street building. The contract called for Inex to pay Matrix's costs "plus a fee equal to 50 per cent of such cost." Matrix says it is still owed $309,786 on the contract. The documents show Inex was to pay Matrix $316,179 to remodel the condominium offices. The contract called for Inex to pay Matrix's costs plus a fee of 20 per cent "of such cost." Matrix says it is owed $35,380 for the work. "Basically, they ran out of money before I got my money," Claude Cavalier said. "It came down to me saying, 'Ed, you've got to pay me.' And he said, 'I've got to pay my people or I'm going out of business.' To put it in a nutshell, he doesn't have anything." Income tax officials will not discuss Inex, citing the secrecy provisions of the Income Tax Act. But Claude Cavalier said the Department of National Revenue is virtually in partnership with his brother in an effort to save the company and avoid the political embarrassment of seeing the company go under in a blaze of adverse publicity. "They're working together, hand in hand," he said. Edward Cavalier is the Toronto- born son of poor Sicilian immigrants (the family name was originally Cavalieri). He has no formal training in computer technology, but he has tried for years to develop a system that would permit low-cost access to electronic data-bank systems around the world. Inex was to use the $32.5-million it raised through the sale of scientific research tax credits to develop the system. The company was supposed to match the $32.5-million with funds it raised itself. Despite extensive efforts, the company has so far been unable to attract investors and it is running out of money to continue research. The tax credit was introduced by the former Liberal government in April, 1983, to encourage investment in research and development by providing a lucrative 50 per cent tax credit on such expenditures. The Conservative Government killed the program this year after heavy criticism of the scheme. Since then, income tax officials have identified between $400-million and $500-million in claims for the credit that "could be in jeopardy." They say about $120-million of that total has been recovered to date through legal action.
  14. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    I wonder if Edward Cavalier is still around, and if he is still involved with soccer? The guy deserves to be in The Soccer Hall of Fame! The CPL sure could use a few men like him.
  15. Robert

    CPL inaugural match - #1 attended match for 2019?

    Friday, August 23, 1985 JAMES DAVIDSON By JAMES DAVIDSON Although Inex Canada's first, and perhaps, last season was largely unprofitable, club president Edward Cavalier says his venture into professional soccer didn't cost as much as he had expected. Inex finished play earlier this month with a 2-3-3 record in a series of exhibition games against international competition. Though home attendance at Toronto's Varsity Stadium averaged only about 6,000, it was enough to please Cavalier. ''When we started, we calculated we'd have an average of 4,000 per game,'' said Cavalier, who is also chairman of Inex Technologies Inc., a high-tech firm. ''Over all, it was a pleasant surprise and I'm not just saying that.'' Cavalier pumped about $1-million into the team, which rose this spring to provide an employment opportunity for Canada's World Cup players and to fill a professional soccer void left by the demise of the North American Soccer League and the Toronto Blizzard. ''My purpose wasn't to make money. If I expected to make money, I wouldn't have got into soccer,'' Cavalier said. ''There's no way I lost a million dollars on it. I don't think I lost a quarter of that.'' Since the team's bookwork is not completed, an exact loss figure has not been determined. Cavalier is noncommital about his 1986 plans. ''As far as I'm concerned, we've fulfilled our commitment to the national team. As far as there being an Inex Canada team next year, I really don't know.'' Cavalier said he'd like to see both a revamped North American league and a new Canadian soccer circuit in place with Toronto franchises for 1986. But he doesn't see himself as an owner in that scenario. A sponsor's role appeals more to him. ''If anything, I'd like to be a number-one supporter or number- one fan of whatever comes up.'' The Canadian Soccer Association has talked of forming a new national league, but it is far from a certainty for next year. Another North American League is also unlikely so soon after the NASL's death. So it is quite possible the same soccer circumstances will prevail in Toronto next season. The key to Cavalier's further involvement with an Inex team appears to be Canada's performance in the current qualifying round for the World Cup. Canada plays its second match of a four-game, final-round series Sunday in Honduras. In its first match last week, Canada tied Costa Rica 1-1. If Canada wins the series and qualifies for the 1986 Cup in Mexico, then Inex could again serve a purpose as a place for national-team players to keep in competitive shape. Cavalier's only hint of his intentions was to say, ''If I get involved again, it will be something to do with the national-team program.'' The 1985 season would have been more successful financially if Inex hadn't been late in starting up, Cavalier said. ''If we had had another two or three months to prepare and line up more sponsors, we could have broken even.''
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