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Ansem

CanPL Supporter
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  1. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Red and White in CPL new teams speculation   
    I'm dreaming? What does that make you? That's fantasy.
    You really think MLS has remotely any interest in Canada beyond the 3? CPL or not, 3 is all you'll ever see and wouldn't be surprised if some are tossed aside for more lucrative US markets
    At least, my position is fueled by something...which is until Americans are no longer considered domestics on Canadian teams, I don't support MLS. If the day come where that's resolve, I'll be the first to say "let's have our cake and eat it too" 
  2. Thanks
    Ansem got a reaction from Bbeto in Ottawa CPL Club   
    The league never said $1.5M. People claiming inside source did.
    The CPL thought they had a deal with the Fury until they went public without giving notice to the league or Association. You minimize the way they poorly handled this. This was utterly unacceptable and unnecessary. You don't blindside potential future business partners, you let them know in advance that you need an extra year. That was unprofessional, no if or but about it.
    Ok, let me put it in other words. OSEG said that the door was open to join CPL and they would be watching the league closely. That's a "maybe". You really expect the league to take their "maybe" and stay out of the Ottawa market "hoping" that the Fury will change their mind, thus giving them more time to solidify their hold on the market? 
    That's just not how business works. Clearly, CPL thinks the same as they didn't return the courtesy of the "open door". They flat out said that other groups were interested in starting a CPL team in the city and criticized OSEG siding with a US league. 
    To your point, those successful and rich business people can spot a shaky and unreliable potential partner. Not unsalvageable but they were far from pleased on how OSEG handled this publicly unilaterally. They didnt become rich by partnering with people behaving that way and they didn't become rich by avoiding competition. There's no going around it, CPL needs the National Capital Region and a "maybe"/"we'll see" from the Fury isn't good enough. They need Ottawa to success but not necessarily OSEG.
    Harder? Yes but necessary. Ball's in OSEG camp.
    I think CPL did what it could to convince the Fury while arguably, set aside Ottawa for them the entire time where they could have advance talks with other groups. They were willing to accommodate them for the following season. Rightfully so, the league is frustrated and I don't see what's to negotiate here, not after how this was handled publicly.
    This is NY Cosmos all over again who ended up overplaying their hand and MLS simply moved on to NYCFC when the Cosmos were asking for the moon.
    Declining following really...
    USL is a stable league as a whole in the US but utterly irrelevant in Canada. Whatever media deal CPL will have will most likely be better than what USL offers in Canada, hence the potential for more fans following the league.
    Putting this aside, you are ignoring my main point. No one can for the Fury to decide how they do business, but the way they went at it publicly without informing the CSA and CPL is unprofessional and was unnecessary. It's weird because there was a sense of certainty over Ottawa until they flipped at the last minute. You simply don't go public without noticing the other parties. Would they have done so, I'm sure that most of us, including me would have understood the reasoning even if we didnt like it. How they did it was was bad for the league...yet you expect the league to turn the other cheek, let them mull over it for years while being shut out of the market they need. Business doesn't work that way.
    I'd say if they don't announce within the 2019 season that they intend to join in 2020 or 2021 (a firm date), the league will simply move on from OSEG. Not many like their chances at being sanctioned past 2019....curiously enough, the CSA has yet to confirm 2019
     
  3. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Bbeto in Ottawa CPL Club   
    After a whole lot of kneeling and a whole lot of sucking. 😂 
    The league says that other groups are interested in Ottawa. Is it Ottawa or Gatineau? Remains to be seen. The league will assess those group and go with whoever has the most solid plan. Perhaps OSEG wake up. In business, you tend to do business with partners who's a 100% in it with you, trustworthy and see eye to eye with their partners... not unpredictable people who aren't totally buying into your project and blindsides you publicly. If that's how you do business, I'll be sure to avoid you.
    CPL ownership aren't the CSA. If the league was owned and operated by the CSA, I would have conceded that you might have a point but CPL ownership are made of successful and rich business people who made their fortune by not putting up with shit like this and crushing their competitors. You screw with their money and investment, they crush you, that's business. 
    Are you telling me that the other major leagues would have put up with this farce? No and I was glad to see some"Bettman" in Clanachan message after this, purposely bot leaving a door open to OSEG, crushing their take of the event and openly talking other groups interested in the Ottawa market.
    Why are you expecting these guys to put up with it and kneel before the mighty "Fury" who can't even make the playoff in USL when 2008 USL impact not only made CCL but went far with a CANADIAN HEAVY ROSTER? Wake up. CPL is not the CSA and the FURY are being made into something mystical and overrated for some crazy reason that I simply don't get.
    Lastly, outside of Ottawa and this forum, who gives a F***about USL in Canada???? 99% don't give a crap and I could safely say that the majority doesn't even know what it is. CPL can opt to move on with another group and start a team as the league was clear that Ottawa matters to the league. 
  4. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Winnipeg Fury in Ottawa CPL Club   
    Their decisions further demonstrate to which extends they risk overplaying their hands.
    Sure, within the niche box of Canadian Soccer fans, we are a tiny minority of what's out there. I was discussing this with a friend and I pointed out that outside Ottawa (the few fans they have) and Canadian soccer fans, who knows or gives a F about the Ottawa Fury?
    Not many
    How many cups and championship have they won to show for it? How many time have they pulled a Montreal Impact 2009 in Champions League?
    None
    Not making the playoffs doesn't help their value either. A "Calgary Foothills" type of run in USL would have strengthen their hands at trying to call the shots but....not really what happened here. That's how nuts their decisions is. Lowers their value if you ask me.
    I do hope they see the light and do a lot of sucking up and apologizing to CPL to get into the league by 2020...TOPS. Otherwise, I fully support CPL making it work with another group who's 100% IN and 100% believe in CPL... and then permanently moveson from OSEG.
     
  5. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  6. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  7. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  8. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  9. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Winnipeg Fury in Ottawa CPL Club   
    Their decisions further demonstrate to which extends they risk overplaying their hands.
    Sure, within the niche box of Canadian Soccer fans, we are a tiny minority of what's out there. I was discussing this with a friend and I pointed out that outside Ottawa (the few fans they have) and Canadian soccer fans, who knows or gives a F about the Ottawa Fury?
    Not many
    How many cups and championship have they won to show for it? How many time have they pulled a Montreal Impact 2009 in Champions League?
    None
    Not making the playoffs doesn't help their value either. A "Calgary Foothills" type of run in USL would have strengthen their hands at trying to call the shots but....not really what happened here. That's how nuts their decisions is. Lowers their value if you ask me.
    I do hope they see the light and do a lot of sucking up and apologizing to CPL to get into the league by 2020...TOPS. Otherwise, I fully support CPL making it work with another group who's 100% IN and 100% believe in CPL... and then permanently moveson from OSEG.
     
  10. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Winnipeg Fury in Ottawa CPL Club   
    Their decisions further demonstrate to which extends they risk overplaying their hands.
    Sure, within the niche box of Canadian Soccer fans, we are a tiny minority of what's out there. I was discussing this with a friend and I pointed out that outside Ottawa (the few fans they have) and Canadian soccer fans, who knows or gives a F about the Ottawa Fury?
    Not many
    How many cups and championship have they won to show for it? How many time have they pulled a Montreal Impact 2009 in Champions League?
    None
    Not making the playoffs doesn't help their value either. A "Calgary Foothills" type of run in USL would have strengthen their hands at trying to call the shots but....not really what happened here. That's how nuts their decisions is. Lowers their value if you ask me.
    I do hope they see the light and do a lot of sucking up and apologizing to CPL to get into the league by 2020...TOPS. Otherwise, I fully support CPL making it work with another group who's 100% IN and 100% believe in CPL... and then permanently moveson from OSEG.
     
  11. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  12. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Winnipeg Fury in Ottawa CPL Club   
    The CSA could turn around and end their sanctioning in USL. Then it would get interesting.
  13. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from m-g-williams in Ottawa CPL Club   
    You have to think that CPL will be more attractive to some of their players.
    Oh well, hope the Fury have fun in an irrelevant league next year
  14. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  15. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from m-g-williams in Ottawa CPL Club   
    You have to think that CPL will be more attractive to some of their players.
    Oh well, hope the Fury have fun in an irrelevant league next year
  16. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  17. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Kent in HFX Wanderers launch/2019 offseason thread   
  18. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from Red and White in CPL new teams speculation   
    I'm dreaming? What does that make you? That's fantasy.
    You really think MLS has remotely any interest in Canada beyond the 3? CPL or not, 3 is all you'll ever see and wouldn't be surprised if some are tossed aside for more lucrative US markets
    At least, my position is fueled by something...which is until Americans are no longer considered domestics on Canadian teams, I don't support MLS. If the day come where that's resolve, I'll be the first to say "let's have our cake and eat it too" 
  19. Thanks
    Ansem got a reaction from Ivan in CPL new teams speculation   
    The translation for those who wants to read it:
     
    Translation from CBC:
    It's always staggering to see how some sports team owners seem disconnected from the society in which they live. The last in the running is Joey Saputo, the owner of the Montreal Impact.

    A text by Martin Leclerc

    Last Friday, Mr. Saputo invited the media to a sort of round table during which he spent almost two hours unveiling the financial challenges facing his soccer club. In particular, he argued that his business loses about $ 11 million per season.

    To turn things around, he believes his company needs to be more combative and sell some 4,500 additional season tickets, which would allow him to join the MLS average. Ticket prices will also be increased to beautify the revenue column.

    Then the rabbit comes out of the hat ...

    ***

    To make the Impact more competitive financially compared to other formations, Joey Saputo would like to invest 50 million in the team's stadium to build lodges and some more luxurious sections that would significantly increase revenues. Unfortunately, he says, this major project remains on the ice because the property taxes of the City of Montreal are unfair and too high for his taste.

    For someone unfamiliar with the history of Saputo Stadium, Joey Saputo brilliantly pleads his case. He explains that the team pays about 2 million municipal taxes per year for the stadium and the training center, which is established on the site of the former Letourneux barracks.

    The stadium does not belong to him or the ground on which it is built, in the shadow of the Olympic stadium, he pleads. As for the training site, only the building belongs to the team, while the grounds on which the players and youths of the Academy train remain the property of the borough of Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve.

    "If I invest in the stadium, which does not belong to me, I will have to pay more property taxes and it would not be worth it [to renovate the stadium]. We pay 2 million municipal taxes a year for a stadium in which I invested 60 million during construction. Saputo Stadium does not belong to me. [...] We gave $ 60 million for Montreal to have a stadium. Today, I am taxed on a donation! Tax me on my business, but not on what I give! Says Joey Saputo.

    When you listen to him, you almost have the impression that this businessman, from a sophisticated background and a member of one of the richest families in Canada, is being extorted outright by the municipal administration.

    But that is not quite the case.

    ***

    In the mid-2000s, Joey Saputo decided to build a stadium for his club, which had existed for almost 15 years. No one was demonstrating in the streets for Montreal to get a soccer stadium. This project responded solely and specifically to the needs of the Bleu-blanc-noir and was the centerpiece of a business plan prepared by its owner.

    Initially, the project was modest. The works were supposed to cost 15 million. For reasons that belong to them, the owners of the Impact then decided to place their stadium under the legal framework of a non-profit organization (NPO). But in the end, the legal personality of the stadium does not matter. This stadium was not built for the population. Its raison d'être is simple: it is the home and headquarters of the Montreal Impact just like the Bell Center is the home and head office of the Canadiens. And all the income that comes out, about $ 500,000 per game according to Mr. Saputo, is found in the coffers of his company.

    The construction of the stadium finally cost 17 million. According to the documents submitted by the Impact and the RIO at the time, the Saputo family donated $ 7.5 million to the NPO and the rest of the construction was financed over 25 years.

    In addition, the stadium was built on RIO land, which allowed the Impact to save a considerable amount. The bill to buy land located in the heart of the city, near a subway line and large enough to build a stadium would certainly be several million. To allow Joey Saputo to use the premises as he pleased as if he were the owner, the City of Montreal then granted him a very modest 40-year long generous lease.

    Incredibly, ten years later, Joey Saputo comes out on the public square to argue that since the land does not belong to him, he should not be subject to the same taxation regime as the other corporate citizens of Montreal! Memory is a faculty that forgets, no doubt.
     
    In the early 2010s, shortly after the opening of the stadium, Joey Saputo's company got a grant from the MLS. Expansion work then became necessary to meet league requirements and upgrade the stadium capacity from 13,000 to 20,000 seats.

    To offset the bill, the Quebec government then extended no less than $ 23 million. Expansion work eventually cost $30 million. Generously, the owner of the Impact then put his hand in his pocket to find the missing 7 million.

    If you followed the story well, the Saputo stadium finally cost $ 47 million, nearly half of which was borne by Quebec taxpayers. Not to mention the land graciously offered by the RIO. As for Joey Saputo, he has offered a soccer stadium for the modest sum of some 14.5 million, which is exceptional.

    However, we are far from the $ 60 million donation Joey Saputo claims to have generously given to Montrealers.

    (A parenthesis here to emphasize that since its construction, the stadium of the Impact has inherited the name Saputo stadium.Usually, companies pay real fortunes to give their name and attach their logo at a stadium or amphitheater. For example, Vidéotron paid $ 33 million for the new Québec City amphitheater to bear its name, a sum to which will be added $ 30 million if Quebec one day obtains an NHL franchise A "gift" of $ 7.5 million is it sufficient for Saputo companies to obtain this privilege, and if so, the resulting spinoffs far outweigh the $ 14.5 million Joey Saputo invested in "the stadium that does not belong to him".)

    ***

    The other part of the story that Mr. Saputo forgot to mention is that no later than in 2017, when all Montrealers were faced with the usual tax hikes, the Impact and the Canadian have miraculously seen the property assessments of Saputo Stadium and the Bell Center fall!

    As if by magic, the Saputo Stadium property assessment went from 43.9 to 33.7 million, a drop of nearly 25%. In April 2017, the daily newspaper La Presse reported that the tax bill of the Impact had been reduced in equivalent proportions, or $ 393,000 per year. What landowner in Montreal would not dream of seeing his tax bill drop by 24.4%?

    And as luck would have it, the training center tax bill was also reduced by $ 18,000 a year (16.6%).

    For the past two years, the Impact has saved more than $ 800,000 in property taxes because the City of Montreal has listened to Joey Saputo's grievances. As a victim of unjust taxation, we have probably seen worse.

    Despite all of the above, on Friday, October 12, 2018, Mr. Saputo found that it was a good idea to call the media representatives to complain about his municipal tax bill. He even confided that he had met with the mayor of Montreal, Valérie Plante, to ask him to intervene on his behalf.

    Perhaps Joey Saputo has forgotten that just 10 months ago, when she had just been elected mayor, Mrs. Plante denied an election promise and bludgeoned Montrealers with a rise in taxes of 3.3%, which was to be the biggest increase of the last six years?

    It paid a heavy political price for this clumsiness, which however justified by the great urgency of renovating the infrastructures of the city.

    It will be very interesting to see if the mayor, when all ordinary citizens tighten their belts, will feel challenged by the so-called injustice that Joey Saputo and the leaders of the Impact complain about.
  20. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from apbsmith in CNL - Canada vs Dominica - October 16th Toronto   
    Cap: Busti, Tabla, Brault-Guillard
  21. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from m-g-williams in Ottawa CPL Club   
    You have to think that CPL will be more attractive to some of their players.
    Oh well, hope the Fury have fun in an irrelevant league next year
  22. Like
    Ansem got a reaction from m-g-williams in Ottawa CPL Club   
    You have to think that CPL will be more attractive to some of their players.
    Oh well, hope the Fury have fun in an irrelevant league next year
  23. Thanks
    Ansem got a reaction from Ivan in CPL new teams speculation   
    The translation for those who wants to read it:
     
    Translation from CBC:
    It's always staggering to see how some sports team owners seem disconnected from the society in which they live. The last in the running is Joey Saputo, the owner of the Montreal Impact.

    A text by Martin Leclerc

    Last Friday, Mr. Saputo invited the media to a sort of round table during which he spent almost two hours unveiling the financial challenges facing his soccer club. In particular, he argued that his business loses about $ 11 million per season.

    To turn things around, he believes his company needs to be more combative and sell some 4,500 additional season tickets, which would allow him to join the MLS average. Ticket prices will also be increased to beautify the revenue column.

    Then the rabbit comes out of the hat ...

    ***

    To make the Impact more competitive financially compared to other formations, Joey Saputo would like to invest 50 million in the team's stadium to build lodges and some more luxurious sections that would significantly increase revenues. Unfortunately, he says, this major project remains on the ice because the property taxes of the City of Montreal are unfair and too high for his taste.

    For someone unfamiliar with the history of Saputo Stadium, Joey Saputo brilliantly pleads his case. He explains that the team pays about 2 million municipal taxes per year for the stadium and the training center, which is established on the site of the former Letourneux barracks.

    The stadium does not belong to him or the ground on which it is built, in the shadow of the Olympic stadium, he pleads. As for the training site, only the building belongs to the team, while the grounds on which the players and youths of the Academy train remain the property of the borough of Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve.

    "If I invest in the stadium, which does not belong to me, I will have to pay more property taxes and it would not be worth it [to renovate the stadium]. We pay 2 million municipal taxes a year for a stadium in which I invested 60 million during construction. Saputo Stadium does not belong to me. [...] We gave $ 60 million for Montreal to have a stadium. Today, I am taxed on a donation! Tax me on my business, but not on what I give! Says Joey Saputo.

    When you listen to him, you almost have the impression that this businessman, from a sophisticated background and a member of one of the richest families in Canada, is being extorted outright by the municipal administration.

    But that is not quite the case.

    ***

    In the mid-2000s, Joey Saputo decided to build a stadium for his club, which had existed for almost 15 years. No one was demonstrating in the streets for Montreal to get a soccer stadium. This project responded solely and specifically to the needs of the Bleu-blanc-noir and was the centerpiece of a business plan prepared by its owner.

    Initially, the project was modest. The works were supposed to cost 15 million. For reasons that belong to them, the owners of the Impact then decided to place their stadium under the legal framework of a non-profit organization (NPO). But in the end, the legal personality of the stadium does not matter. This stadium was not built for the population. Its raison d'être is simple: it is the home and headquarters of the Montreal Impact just like the Bell Center is the home and head office of the Canadiens. And all the income that comes out, about $ 500,000 per game according to Mr. Saputo, is found in the coffers of his company.

    The construction of the stadium finally cost 17 million. According to the documents submitted by the Impact and the RIO at the time, the Saputo family donated $ 7.5 million to the NPO and the rest of the construction was financed over 25 years.

    In addition, the stadium was built on RIO land, which allowed the Impact to save a considerable amount. The bill to buy land located in the heart of the city, near a subway line and large enough to build a stadium would certainly be several million. To allow Joey Saputo to use the premises as he pleased as if he were the owner, the City of Montreal then granted him a very modest 40-year long generous lease.

    Incredibly, ten years later, Joey Saputo comes out on the public square to argue that since the land does not belong to him, he should not be subject to the same taxation regime as the other corporate citizens of Montreal! Memory is a faculty that forgets, no doubt.
     
    In the early 2010s, shortly after the opening of the stadium, Joey Saputo's company got a grant from the MLS. Expansion work then became necessary to meet league requirements and upgrade the stadium capacity from 13,000 to 20,000 seats.

    To offset the bill, the Quebec government then extended no less than $ 23 million. Expansion work eventually cost $30 million. Generously, the owner of the Impact then put his hand in his pocket to find the missing 7 million.

    If you followed the story well, the Saputo stadium finally cost $ 47 million, nearly half of which was borne by Quebec taxpayers. Not to mention the land graciously offered by the RIO. As for Joey Saputo, he has offered a soccer stadium for the modest sum of some 14.5 million, which is exceptional.

    However, we are far from the $ 60 million donation Joey Saputo claims to have generously given to Montrealers.

    (A parenthesis here to emphasize that since its construction, the stadium of the Impact has inherited the name Saputo stadium.Usually, companies pay real fortunes to give their name and attach their logo at a stadium or amphitheater. For example, Vidéotron paid $ 33 million for the new Québec City amphitheater to bear its name, a sum to which will be added $ 30 million if Quebec one day obtains an NHL franchise A "gift" of $ 7.5 million is it sufficient for Saputo companies to obtain this privilege, and if so, the resulting spinoffs far outweigh the $ 14.5 million Joey Saputo invested in "the stadium that does not belong to him".)

    ***

    The other part of the story that Mr. Saputo forgot to mention is that no later than in 2017, when all Montrealers were faced with the usual tax hikes, the Impact and the Canadian have miraculously seen the property assessments of Saputo Stadium and the Bell Center fall!

    As if by magic, the Saputo Stadium property assessment went from 43.9 to 33.7 million, a drop of nearly 25%. In April 2017, the daily newspaper La Presse reported that the tax bill of the Impact had been reduced in equivalent proportions, or $ 393,000 per year. What landowner in Montreal would not dream of seeing his tax bill drop by 24.4%?

    And as luck would have it, the training center tax bill was also reduced by $ 18,000 a year (16.6%).

    For the past two years, the Impact has saved more than $ 800,000 in property taxes because the City of Montreal has listened to Joey Saputo's grievances. As a victim of unjust taxation, we have probably seen worse.

    Despite all of the above, on Friday, October 12, 2018, Mr. Saputo found that it was a good idea to call the media representatives to complain about his municipal tax bill. He even confided that he had met with the mayor of Montreal, Valérie Plante, to ask him to intervene on his behalf.

    Perhaps Joey Saputo has forgotten that just 10 months ago, when she had just been elected mayor, Mrs. Plante denied an election promise and bludgeoned Montrealers with a rise in taxes of 3.3%, which was to be the biggest increase of the last six years?

    It paid a heavy political price for this clumsiness, which however justified by the great urgency of renovating the infrastructures of the city.

    It will be very interesting to see if the mayor, when all ordinary citizens tighten their belts, will feel challenged by the so-called injustice that Joey Saputo and the leaders of the Impact complain about.
  24. Thanks
    Ansem got a reaction from Ivan in CPL new teams speculation   
    The translation for those who wants to read it:
     
    Translation from CBC:
    It's always staggering to see how some sports team owners seem disconnected from the society in which they live. The last in the running is Joey Saputo, the owner of the Montreal Impact.

    A text by Martin Leclerc

    Last Friday, Mr. Saputo invited the media to a sort of round table during which he spent almost two hours unveiling the financial challenges facing his soccer club. In particular, he argued that his business loses about $ 11 million per season.

    To turn things around, he believes his company needs to be more combative and sell some 4,500 additional season tickets, which would allow him to join the MLS average. Ticket prices will also be increased to beautify the revenue column.

    Then the rabbit comes out of the hat ...

    ***

    To make the Impact more competitive financially compared to other formations, Joey Saputo would like to invest 50 million in the team's stadium to build lodges and some more luxurious sections that would significantly increase revenues. Unfortunately, he says, this major project remains on the ice because the property taxes of the City of Montreal are unfair and too high for his taste.

    For someone unfamiliar with the history of Saputo Stadium, Joey Saputo brilliantly pleads his case. He explains that the team pays about 2 million municipal taxes per year for the stadium and the training center, which is established on the site of the former Letourneux barracks.

    The stadium does not belong to him or the ground on which it is built, in the shadow of the Olympic stadium, he pleads. As for the training site, only the building belongs to the team, while the grounds on which the players and youths of the Academy train remain the property of the borough of Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve.

    "If I invest in the stadium, which does not belong to me, I will have to pay more property taxes and it would not be worth it [to renovate the stadium]. We pay 2 million municipal taxes a year for a stadium in which I invested 60 million during construction. Saputo Stadium does not belong to me. [...] We gave $ 60 million for Montreal to have a stadium. Today, I am taxed on a donation! Tax me on my business, but not on what I give! Says Joey Saputo.

    When you listen to him, you almost have the impression that this businessman, from a sophisticated background and a member of one of the richest families in Canada, is being extorted outright by the municipal administration.

    But that is not quite the case.

    ***

    In the mid-2000s, Joey Saputo decided to build a stadium for his club, which had existed for almost 15 years. No one was demonstrating in the streets for Montreal to get a soccer stadium. This project responded solely and specifically to the needs of the Bleu-blanc-noir and was the centerpiece of a business plan prepared by its owner.

    Initially, the project was modest. The works were supposed to cost 15 million. For reasons that belong to them, the owners of the Impact then decided to place their stadium under the legal framework of a non-profit organization (NPO). But in the end, the legal personality of the stadium does not matter. This stadium was not built for the population. Its raison d'être is simple: it is the home and headquarters of the Montreal Impact just like the Bell Center is the home and head office of the Canadiens. And all the income that comes out, about $ 500,000 per game according to Mr. Saputo, is found in the coffers of his company.

    The construction of the stadium finally cost 17 million. According to the documents submitted by the Impact and the RIO at the time, the Saputo family donated $ 7.5 million to the NPO and the rest of the construction was financed over 25 years.

    In addition, the stadium was built on RIO land, which allowed the Impact to save a considerable amount. The bill to buy land located in the heart of the city, near a subway line and large enough to build a stadium would certainly be several million. To allow Joey Saputo to use the premises as he pleased as if he were the owner, the City of Montreal then granted him a very modest 40-year long generous lease.

    Incredibly, ten years later, Joey Saputo comes out on the public square to argue that since the land does not belong to him, he should not be subject to the same taxation regime as the other corporate citizens of Montreal! Memory is a faculty that forgets, no doubt.
     
    In the early 2010s, shortly after the opening of the stadium, Joey Saputo's company got a grant from the MLS. Expansion work then became necessary to meet league requirements and upgrade the stadium capacity from 13,000 to 20,000 seats.

    To offset the bill, the Quebec government then extended no less than $ 23 million. Expansion work eventually cost $30 million. Generously, the owner of the Impact then put his hand in his pocket to find the missing 7 million.

    If you followed the story well, the Saputo stadium finally cost $ 47 million, nearly half of which was borne by Quebec taxpayers. Not to mention the land graciously offered by the RIO. As for Joey Saputo, he has offered a soccer stadium for the modest sum of some 14.5 million, which is exceptional.

    However, we are far from the $ 60 million donation Joey Saputo claims to have generously given to Montrealers.

    (A parenthesis here to emphasize that since its construction, the stadium of the Impact has inherited the name Saputo stadium.Usually, companies pay real fortunes to give their name and attach their logo at a stadium or amphitheater. For example, Vidéotron paid $ 33 million for the new Québec City amphitheater to bear its name, a sum to which will be added $ 30 million if Quebec one day obtains an NHL franchise A "gift" of $ 7.5 million is it sufficient for Saputo companies to obtain this privilege, and if so, the resulting spinoffs far outweigh the $ 14.5 million Joey Saputo invested in "the stadium that does not belong to him".)

    ***

    The other part of the story that Mr. Saputo forgot to mention is that no later than in 2017, when all Montrealers were faced with the usual tax hikes, the Impact and the Canadian have miraculously seen the property assessments of Saputo Stadium and the Bell Center fall!

    As if by magic, the Saputo Stadium property assessment went from 43.9 to 33.7 million, a drop of nearly 25%. In April 2017, the daily newspaper La Presse reported that the tax bill of the Impact had been reduced in equivalent proportions, or $ 393,000 per year. What landowner in Montreal would not dream of seeing his tax bill drop by 24.4%?

    And as luck would have it, the training center tax bill was also reduced by $ 18,000 a year (16.6%).

    For the past two years, the Impact has saved more than $ 800,000 in property taxes because the City of Montreal has listened to Joey Saputo's grievances. As a victim of unjust taxation, we have probably seen worse.

    Despite all of the above, on Friday, October 12, 2018, Mr. Saputo found that it was a good idea to call the media representatives to complain about his municipal tax bill. He even confided that he had met with the mayor of Montreal, Valérie Plante, to ask him to intervene on his behalf.

    Perhaps Joey Saputo has forgotten that just 10 months ago, when she had just been elected mayor, Mrs. Plante denied an election promise and bludgeoned Montrealers with a rise in taxes of 3.3%, which was to be the biggest increase of the last six years?

    It paid a heavy political price for this clumsiness, which however justified by the great urgency of renovating the infrastructures of the city.

    It will be very interesting to see if the mayor, when all ordinary citizens tighten their belts, will feel challenged by the so-called injustice that Joey Saputo and the leaders of the Impact complain about.
  25. Like
    Ansem reacted to Sébastien in CPL new teams speculation   
    Just to correct a few matters:
    The Government of Québec ended up paying the vast majority of the cost of the actual stadium, on top of the RIO basically giving away the land (sure he does not own it, but doubtful he would have built it had he had to find the land in the first place). I also understand that the idea of the stadium "not being his" is because he took the decision to put in place a non-profit (which has its own advantages) to own the stadium.
    Lots of great information here on how Saputo asking taxpayers for more support is pretty ludicrous.
    https://ici.radio-canada.ca/sports/1129753/joey-saputo-impact-montreal-mls-taxes-ville-montreal-chronique-martin-leclerc
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