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georg

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About georg

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    Kitchener, ON, Canada.
  1. From FIFA Aussie comeback astounds Germany (PA) Tuesday 29 March 2011 Australia earned some measure of revenge for their FIFA World Cup™ thrashing at the hands of Germany with an unlikely 2-1 victory in their international friendly in Dortmund tonight. Germany looked on course to replicate their 4-0 win in Durban last summer when Mario Gomez scored a 26th-minute opener in a dominant first half for the world's No3 ranked side. But the Socceroos stunned their hosts with two goals in four second-half minutes, first through David Carney and then a Luke Wilkshire penalty, to claim their first ever win over the Europeans. It was also another feather in the cap of Australia's new German coach Holger Osieck, who guided his side to the final of the AFC Asian Cup in his first tournament in charge in January. Germany coach Joachim Low did make a host of changes to the side that beat Kazakhstan 4-0 in their UEFA EURO 2012 qualifier at the weekend. Andre Schurrle and Sven Bender were handed their full international debuts, while Low completely changed his back five, with Tim Wiese trusted in goal. Australia were, however, without their star man Tim Cahill, meaning Brett Holman partnered Harry Kewell up front. Germany completely controlled the opening period with Mainz's rising star Schurrle particularly impressive as his close control and probing passing punched holes in the Australia defence. We just wanted to put in a good account of ourselves. Australia's German coach Holger Osieck The visitors responded with some typically tough tackling, with Mile Jedinak's late challenge on Schurrle earning him a caution and the ire of Low on the touchline. Australia were not all muscle though and Holman met a long-range Lucas Neill pass with a first-time volley which flashed wide. Germany remained unflustered and patiently built attack after attack before a delightful goal in the 26th minute. Thomas Muller's step-over allowed the ball to travel through to Schurrle and he held off two defenders before finding Gomez, who weighted his shot perfectly to beat a diving Mark Schwarzer into the top corner. Lukas Podolski flashed a couple of free-kicks wide as Germany sought a second, while Australia's best chance before the break saw Jedinak head a corner straight at Wiese. After the break Podolski headed into the side-netting before Low was off his bench again after Wilkshire brought down Marcel Schmelzer with an ugly diving challenge which could have been punished with a red card. Wilkshire compounded Low's anger by scoring, but it was only poor defending to blame for allowing the visitors to equalise on 61 minutes. Blackpool full-back Carney ran onto his own pass, after Matt McKay allowed it to run on, and slipped his shot under the exposed Wiese. The Socceroos then grabbed an unlikely lead four minutes later when Kewell went down under the merest of pressure from Christian Trasch and Wilkshire fired in the resulting penalty. Germany tried to respond with Schurrle denied by Schwarzer before Miroslav Klose bundled an effort wide after getting behind the defence. Klose was then booked for a dive in the area with a minute remaining as Australia held on for a historic win. Germany coach Joachim Low was punished for naming a weakened side with the most embarrassing defeat of his four-and-a-half year tenure in charge. "That is a little unfortunate," admitted Low. "In the first half, I thought the young players actually did quite well. But in the second half we threw the game away." For Australia's Osieck, who took charge last August, this was his country's biggest win in recent years. "It would have been presumptuous before the game to believe that we could win," said Osieck, who was Germany's assistant coach when they won the 1990 FIFA World Cup title in Italy. "In addition, I know the German team very well and know their quality. We just wanted to put in a good account of ourselves. We had a few weak points in the first half and lost the ball too quickly. But we just got better and better in the second half."
  2. Don't know if this is the right place to place this but...... From the KW Record Return to Serbia brings back troubling memories http://news.therecord.com/Sports/article/553096 June 13, 2009 Christine Rivet RECORD STAFF KITCHENER When Branko Gavric strides onto the soccer pitch wearing Canada's colours in his native Serbia, he'll fly the flags of everyone he remembers back at Eastwood Collegiate. Eastwood's patchwork of nationalities and the possibilities they shaped together have left an indelible mark on him. More than the championships he helped the Eastwood Rebels win during his days there, Gavric recalls how the game of soccer united a disparate group of boys. Many, like him, were new to Canada. Gavric, 21, was recently named to Canada's entry at the Summer Universiade. Also known as the World University Games, the event runs July 1-12 in Belgrade. "I feel like I'm representing all those guys," said Kitchener's Gavric, an all-conference midfielder and captain of his new team, the College of Charleston in South Carolina. "Not everyone had the opportunities I did. "These are the people who always wished me well. So I carry them on my shoulders and remember them." Now a Canadian citizen, the son of working-class parents recalls how the bombs in his war-torn homeland chased his family to Canada 14 years ago. Gavric's relationship with soccer is thorny. Although the sport opened up a world of opportunity for Gavric, it nearly killed him, too. When a missile exploded near his house in Serbia, at the exact spot where he and his father, Nebojsa, were playing soccer moments before, the family knew it was time to leave. "That was life or death. It was destiny right there," remembered Gavric. "There was no way anybody could have survived that blast. Half the house was missing." Those dark days in Serbia are memories that don't fade. And now, Gavric gets the chance to return to a rebuilt Serbia, playing the game he loves, for his new country, before family members who stayed behind. He can only hope that this time his generation gets it right. "I don't hold any grudges or hate toward anyone. I just try to move on and build peace." When the curly topped Gavric arrived at Eastwood and its English-as-a-second-language program, he and many other recent immigrants gathered on the only familiar territory they could find -- the school's soccer field. Soccer was the common denominator for the kids, some of whom had escaped the former Yugoslavia be they Serb, Bosnian, Croatian or Kosovar. Gavric remembers a time when such a union between those ethic groups on the soccer field would have sparked a riot in Yugoslavia. "You just remind them that they have to forget what's going on back home," said Gavric's former coach at Eastwood, Jaret Brown. "It's time to start fresh and that's what they do." "The ball is what brings everyone together," Gavric said after his helped the Rebels win the senior boys regional soccer crown 2005. This summer and before he returns for his third year in Charleston, Gavric is working for a soccer academy in Toronto and is playing for one of the top amateur clubs in Canada, the Toronto Lynx. He dreams of tugging the senior Canadian national team jersey over his head. Gavric can also envision a time when he returns to Eastwood, as a teacher. "I love trying to help kids out anyway I can. I think that would be a great job, to be able to set the path for the future." Another of Gavric's former soccer coaches at Eastwood, George Sedra, remains an academic adviser to Gavric, who maintains a B-plus average in his biology studies down south. Sedra said he'll be thrilled the day Gavric unpacks his briefcase at Eastwood. "This (place) was a defining moment in his life. It is always your first success, your first moment that drives you and makes you soar to higher skies. No wonder Branko wants to come back to teach at Eastwood." crivet@therecord.com
  3. From KW Record Kitchener's David Edgar might leave Newcastle June 12, 2009 Jeff Hicks RECORD STAFF KITCHENER http://news.therecord.com/Sports/article/552377 S. Keep this quiet, English soccer fans. Kitchener's David Edgar is up for grabs. His two-year contract with Newcastle United, just relegated from the top-flight Premier League to second-tier League Championship, has expired. The 22-year-old defender is available to other clubs after eight years of grooming in the Newcastle system. Between us and the goalpost, other teams are after him. "You hear whispers from clubs," Edgar said yesterday from his parents' Kitchener home after a vacation in Egypt where he got to ride a camel. "And from the press." Whispers like Birmingham City, just promoted to the Premiership, is after him. That's what the British press murmurs. Burnley has just been promoted too and is a more likely destination, our sources say. Just 'cause Newcastle is going down after a season-ending 1-0 loss at Aston Villa last month doesn't mean Edgar has to drop down a notch too. But he could. Several League Championship clubs have keen interest, Edgar confirms. However, Edgar keeps mum on specific destinations. He hasn't ruled out a return to Newcastle, which sent him a contract offer last week in order to retain his rights as a player under the age of 24. Any other club which signs Edgar must send compensation Newcastle's way. It [probably won't be the $145-million offer Real Madrid sent Manchester United for the rights to Cristiano Ronaldo. But some far-less-outrageous sum would get it done. Edgar earned a red card late in the loss at Aston Villa and regrets not being on the field to give the Newcastle fans an end-of-match clap for their support. "I've been with Newcastle 7-8 years," said Edgar, who scored a goal in his Magpies home debut on Jan. 1, 2007. "I've never even been on loan. I don't know what it's like on other teams. I'm excited -- if that's what happens, if I go to another team." Edgar can expect to make NHL-style money with his next contract. We're talking $1 million plus. Two years ago, a survey by Britain's The Independent suggested the average Premier player earned $1.49 million. Of course, Edgar could stick with Newcastle and play down a level. The Magpies are in disarray, however. The ownership situation is uncertain. They have no manager. Edgar has a tough choice to make about his future and he wants to make it before the end of June. Most clubs get back to work in early July and he doesn't want to be out of a team. "I just want to get my future sorted, wherever it is." jhicks@therecord.com
  4. From KW Record Kitchener's David Edgar might leave Newcastle June 12, 2009 Jeff Hicks RECORD STAFF KITCHENER http://news.therecord.com/Sports/article/552377 S. Keep this quiet, English soccer fans. Kitchener's David Edgar is up for grabs. His two-year contract with Newcastle United, just relegated from the top-flight Premier League to second-tier League Championship, has expired. The 22-year-old defender is available to other clubs after eight years of grooming in the Newcastle system. Between us and the goalpost, other teams are after him. "You hear whispers from clubs," Edgar said yesterday from his parents' Kitchener home after a vacation in Egypt where he got to ride a camel. "And from the press." Whispers like Birmingham City, just promoted to the Premiership, is after him. That's what the British press murmurs. Burnley has just been promoted too and is a more likely destination, our sources say. Just 'cause Newcastle is going down after a season-ending 1-0 loss at Aston Villa last month doesn't mean Edgar has to drop down a notch too. But he could. Several League Championship clubs have keen interest, Edgar confirms. However, Edgar keeps mum on specific destinations. He hasn't ruled out a return to Newcastle, which sent him a contract offer last week in order to retain his rights as a player under the age of 24. Any other club which signs Edgar must send compensation Newcastle's way. It [probably won't be the $145-million offer Real Madrid sent Manchester United for the rights to Cristiano Ronaldo. But some far-less-outrageous sum would get it done. Edgar earned a red card late in the loss at Aston Villa and regrets not being on the field to give the Newcastle fans an end-of-match clap for their support. "I've been with Newcastle 7-8 years," said Edgar, who scored a goal in his Magpies home debut on Jan. 1, 2007. "I've never even been on loan. I don't know what it's like on other teams. I'm excited -- if that's what happens, if I go to another team." Edgar can expect to make NHL-style money with his next contract. We're talking $1 million plus. Two years ago, a survey by Britain's The Independent suggested the average Premier player earned $1.49 million. Of course, Edgar could stick with Newcastle and play down a level. The Magpies are in disarray, however. The ownership situation is uncertain. They have no manager. Edgar has a tough choice to make about his future and he wants to make it before the end of June. Most clubs get back to work in early July and he doesn't want to be out of a team. "I just want to get my future sorted, wherever it is." jhicks@therecord.com
  5. I read somewhere in one of the subjects listed that someone refered that there is no heat in the Oylmpic Stadium. Below is an article about the Annual Dog Show hels there. Look at bottom of the article it states that temperture outside was 5 Deg Cel. and Inside approx. 20 Deg Cel. Sunday, November 25, 2007 Guides Canins trial (Montreal Olympic Stadium) Lucy sporting red in the blue province LUCY WINS FIRST PLACE AT THE OLYMPIC S(tadium)! (Sorry, just couldn't resist that one :-) Guides Canins hosted a trial in conjunction with the Salon National des Animaux de Compagnie, a huge companion animal exhibition held annually at the Olympic Stadium in Montreal (host city for the 1976 Olympics). Along with the agility trial was a flyball tournament, disc competition, obedience competition, show dog competition, and tons of exhibitors including many who gave away free samples of stuff, woo hoo. It was pretty funny, you could easily tell who was there to compete in flyball/agility vs. those competing in the show dog thing. Some pretty fancy pants in that ring! We stopped in Friday evening to do a couple of runs in the show'n'go, and she handled the dogwalk and teeter well. Then on Sunday, the real fun began. Starters Standard Given Lucy's teeter and dogwalk history, I was going to scratch her from this class because the dogwalk was right up against the edge of the ring along which most of the audience gathered. But, luckily the class ran before the arena opened to the public, so there was no audience to speak of. So, we gave it a go. She didn't look happy descending the frame so I decided once and for all to stop insisting on 2o2o for the frame. Come to think of it, she was quite comfortable with 2o2o on a Specials height frame, but has never liked it at the regular height. So.... really need to take some time out at some point and train a proper running frame... Anyway. She was slow and hesitant on the teeter but I let her figure it out on her own and she did it, yay! Then, only a tunnel separated it from the dogwalk, which she was very hesitant about. Took her around again to get a fresh approach and she did it, yay! She held 2o2o on both obstacles. She had a nice run but all of the hesitation ate up time and we ended up .3 of a second over. Starters Jumpers She was looking not very energized as we went into the ring and didn't seem to be running at her fastest, but turns out her YPS was 4.4 which isn't bad. Despite feeling slow, she had good focus and ran well, taking the only Q and therefore first place out of the 8 dogs in total who ran the course. On her post-run walk she was quick to do a #2, so that could explain some of her slowness in the ring, poor girl! Steeplechase The crowd for Steeplechase. Wow, by this point the crowd was at a max and the atmosphere was really fun. Luckily for whatever reason in agility I generally don't get nervous about being watched, because there were hundreds in the audience. So, off we went. The weaves were the third obstacle, and she *walked* through them. I had no idea she was capable of weaving so slowly. Walter can't weave at all unless he has some speed. So it was no surprise that she popped at pole 10. Fiddled around to get her to pass through the last two poles. For the rest of the run her speed was very decent. A couple of goofups including one in perfect time to the music (spin in front of a tunnel) and taking the scenic route around another tunnel, purely to entertain the crowd, I'm sure. It was a really fun run. Apologies for the wonky image/caption formatting but it's the best I can figure out right now. In summary, it was a fun venue and Lucy handled herself really well. I like to think her flyball experience at a variety of tournaments and facilities where the sounds of dozens of madly barking dogs echoes round and round helped prepare her for playing agility in a wildly distracting environment like this one. Stats Temperature: about 5 outside, but pretty warm inside (~20)Classes entered: 3 (Starters Standard, Starters Jumpers, Steeplechase) Qs: 1 (Starters Jumpers) Time/SCT: 74.3/74 (Starters Standard), 25.23/34 (Starters Jumpers), 59.95/43 (Steeplechase) YPS: 4.4 (Starters Jumpers)
  6. From KW Record http://news.therecord.com/Sports/article/464964 Edgar waits for call to start December 30, 2008 Josh Brown RECORD STAFF Scoring goals against the English Premier League's top soccer club is becoming a tradition for Kitchener's David Edgar. The Newcastle United defender burst onto the scene with his game-tying marker against mighty Manchester United two years back in his home debut at St. James' Park in northeast England. This past Sunday, the 21-year-old scored his second pro goal, this time against first-place Liverpool. Edgar scored on a header off a corner kick just before half-time to bring the Magpies within a goal of the lead, but the Reds went on to win 5-1 to put Newcastle at 5-7-8 on the year. "I've seen all the pictures and replays and I jumped pretty high to be fair," said Edgar, when reached at his home in Newcastle. "It was a good header. I don't score many with my head. It's not really me. But I was happy about it and definitely took it well." Making the play extra special was the fact that mom Christine and sister Joanne were in the players' box watching the match. It was Christine's first time seeing her son live in a league game at the Newcastle stadium perched high above town. "Apparently my mom was in tears in at half-time," said Edgar. "She was loving it. I've never seen someone so nervous in my life. She was almost sick to her stomach when I walked in and told her I was starting." Edgar left Kitchener when he was 14 to join Newcastle United's academy and has worked his way up from prospect to mainstay on the senior side, dressing for all but four of the Magpies' 22 matches this season. And while playing time has been scarce, United thought enough about the Canadian centre-back to keep him on the squad instead of sending him out on loan earlier this month. It hasn't exactly been a stable year for the storied franchise. The club has been put up for sale and then taken off the market. It has posted three different managers at the helm in the past year and is still in danger of being relegated to the Championship League. Current skipper Joe Kinnear appreciates hard work and Edgar is hoping his latest header, and solid play, will help him garner more minutes on the pitch. "This gaffer has shown that whoever is playing the best plays," he said. "If I get a run on the team and get four or five games under my belt, who knows what can happen from there?" Edgar spent yesterday eating pizza and analyzing game tape from the Liverpool fixture. He's hoping to get the call to start in Saturday's FA Cup match against Hull City. His contract is up in spring, though the club will have to offer him a new deal if he appears in three more games. He wants to stay in Newcastle but isn't sure where he'll end up. Playing time is paramount and if he isn't going to be used much, he'd like to seek employment elsewhere. The EPL's transfer window opens back up in January, but Edgar hasn't received any indication from the club about its future plans for him. "I went out and played against the league leaders and showed that I can play," he said. "Newcastle is home. I've got a house here, friends and family. But I moved away when I was 14 and I don't have a problem moving anywhere else to get what I want in playing football." jbrown@therecord.com
  7. From CBC... Montreal Impact faces Real Esteli http://sports.sympatico.msn.cbc.ca/news/contentposting.aspx?feedname=cbc-sports-v3&showbyline=true&newsitemid=soccer-concacaf-champions&pagenumber=2 The Montreal Impact will play its first match in the inaugural CONCACAF Champions League when it hosts Nicaraguan club Real Esteli on Wednesday at Saputo Stadium (8 p.m. ET, CBC-Bold, CBCSports.ca). In 2006, organizers elected to expand what was formerly known as the CONCACAF Champions' Cup from eight club teams to 24 from a region that includes North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The Impact and Real Esteli are among 16 teams from 13 different nations and territories participating in the preliminary stage of the tournament, which involves a home-and-away series that determines a winner using aggregate goals. Montreal earned the right to serve as Canada's lone representative in the preliminary round by clinching the Nutrilite Canadian Championship on July 22, with a 1-1 tie against the Toronto FC. The tie allowed Montreal to advance with seven points in the three-team tournament, compared to five points for Toronto FC and four for the Vancouver Whitecaps. The Impact's berth in the tournament was considered somewhat of a surprise considering the stature of its opponent in the final game: Toronto FC plays in Major League Soccer, the top pro league in North America while Montreal competes in the United Soccer League First Division, one level below MLS. But Impact head coach John Limniatis believes his team can continue to surprise in the tournament. "If we stay disciplined defensively and capitalize on our offensive options, we will have success," Limniatis said on the team's official website. "We have respect towards them because they are here for the same reason we are. "The first game is perhaps the most important because if you win, you put pressure on the other team during the second game." Real Esteli punched its ticket to the Champions League in July with a 1-0 win over Walter Ferreti to conclude a home-and-away series on aggregate goals. The two teams tied 0-0 at Esteli's Independencia Stadium in the first game. Montreal midfielder Patrick Leduc said on the team's website that he's expecting a similar brand of defensive soccer from the Nicaraguan side on Wednesday. "If we play with the right intensity, we should have a good result," Leduc said. "We are expecting them to be a little more conservative and organized in front of their own net. We will have to put them under pressure and be aggressive to provoke things and finish off our scoring chances." The second leg of the preliminary round, which will decide the eight teams moving on to the tournament's group stage, will be played next week. Montreal and Real Esteli will square off in the second leg of the opening round next Tuesday at Carlos Miranda Stadium, in Comayagua, Honduras. The game won't be played in Nicaragua as no stadium was in line with the FIFA norms required for the tournament. Eight teams have already clinched automatic berths in the group stage including the Houston Dynamo and D.C. United of the MLS. Four groups of four teams will play in the group stage of the tournament beginning on Sept. 15. The Championship Round of the tournament will follow in February 2009 and will feature the top two teams from each group. The eventual winner of the CONCACAF Champions League will move on to serve as the confederation's sole representative at the 2009 FIBA Club World Cup.
  8. What be a better question: Who would win between Man U vs England?
  9. From KW Record Kitchener's Edgar spends down time watching Euro '08 http://news.therecord.com/Sports/article/367647 June 16, 2008 Josh Brown RECORD STAFF KITCHENER The European Cup couldn't have come at a better time for David Edgar. After all, the Newcastle United defender is recovering from hernia surgery and has been told to take it easy. Sitting on a stool at his local watering hole and watching some of the world's best countries play the Beautiful Game is just the right pace. "I picked Netherlands to win it all," he said recently while catching a match at the Edelweiss Tavern. The Kitchener native is on the tail end of his annual off-season trip home. He's walking a little gingerly after having surgery about a month ago. The nagging injury reared its head in March but he waited until the end of the English Premier League season to go under the knife. "I would wake up and it was sore but I would stretch it out, I'd train and I'd play," he said. "Afterwards I'd literally be lying on the couch and I couldn't get up. And then it would be fine again in a day or two. "I knew it was sore and that eventually I'd get it operated on." The injury isn't considered too serious and he expects to be up and ready in time for the Magpies' training camp later this summer. But it does mean that Edgar won't be able to compete with Canada's men's national squad in its early qualification matches for the 2010 World Cup. Head coach Dale Mitchell and his staff had contacted Edgar with intentions of adding him to the roster but the 21-year-old passed because of his ailing groin. That didn't stop him from following the lads as they nearly upset Brazil, losing a friendly 3-2 in an impressive showing last month. "I watched the Brazil game and it killed me," he said. "At the time I thought it would be good to enjoy the summer and have it off. But when you see the team play, you want to be out there. It's probably the most exciting time for Canada's men's team." Edgar's roller-coaster ride with Newcastle ended on an upswing. After busting out with a memorable goal in his first home game against mighty Manchester United more than a year ago, the swift back seemed lost in the shuffle and a mainstay on Newcastle's reserve squad. But new skipper Kevin Keegan took over the reins in January and took a liking to Edgar. The gaffer inserted the youngster into the lineup for several games down the stretch and the defender proved he could hang with the big boys. "He (Keegan) basically told me that it's up to me in pre-season," Edgar said of his role for the upcoming campaign. "He's going to give me a chance and that's all I've ever asked for and wanted. He's old school football. Whoever is the best plays." Edgar is entering the final year of his two-year pact with the club and hopes to extend his deal. "If I don't have a new contract by Christmas time I'll have to look elsewhere. I'm not sitting until my contract runs out at the end of next summer. I want to stay with Newcastle but I want them to tell me in advance if I'm not getting one (or not) so I can go elsewhere." jbrown@therecord.com
  10. The ‘Don’ does the right thing By Martin Rogers, Yahoo! Sports May 15, 8:18 pm EDT http://sports.yahoo.com/mls/news;_ylt=AtAjjwJkpos3jKmQuYqclfGkvrYF?slug=ro-garber051508&prov=yhoo&type=lgns Major League Soccer is not the most confrontational of professional sports organizations, but commissioner Don Garber showed this week that he is prepared to fight if his league has been slighted. Garber came out swinging following the ill-thought criticism of MLS supporters by television pundit Michael Wilbon, co-host of ESPN’s “Pardon the Interruption.” Wilbon’s case was that the practice of throwing streamers onto the field before corner kicks, which happens with regularity at Toronto FC’s BMO Field and sporadically elsewhere, is “minor league” and “garbage” and harmful to soccer’s reputation. Now, it would have been easy for Garber to ignore these comments and go about his business of trying to continue MLS’ recent and ongoing growth. However, the issue of fan involvement is one guaranteed to raise the ire of those at MLS HQ, as the powers-that-be realize how crucial the phenomenon is to the league’s future. Heavily borrowed from European and South American examples, the involved and interactive fan experience that soccer provides is unique and undeniably special. It is a huge part of why the game is by far the most popular in the world and a factor that Garber and his colleagues believe will, over time, give their league a crucial edge over competing sports. Garber did not come from a soccer background, but in this episode he showed he firmly is in tune with his fans and the unique selling point that soccer offers. In his weekly blog, he stormed back at the criticism, defending the fans’ right to express themselves. “This is a unique phenomenon that happens all over the soccer world,” he said. “We’re playing soccer, not baseball, football or basketball. Our fans are a part of the game experience. That’s one of our points of difference and part of what will drive our future success. “There are plenty of sports leagues in the U.S. and we are not trying to offer the same in-stadium experience. We need to embrace the passion and electricity that makes soccer the world’s most popular sport.” There are some who will claim that the practice of throwing items – even tiny pieces of paper – simply is a prelude to some of the less savory aspects of soccer fandom around the world, namely hooliganism. But it is a ridiculous stretch to try to draw a link between the two. All the marketing companies and demographics experts can do as much planning and research as they like. The simple fact is that if fans enjoy themselves they will return. Toronto FC fans took no time at all to learn how to express themselves once their franchise was founded in 2007, and that example is rubbing off around the league. They have built their own traditions and superstitions and turned their club into an integral part of the city’s sports landscape in about a year. The critics need to calm down and get used to it.
  11. georg

    Amado Guevara signs with TFC

    From ESPN: http://soccernet.espn.go.com/news/story?id=524278&cc=5901 Sources: Toronto signs Guevara to four-year deal Ives Galarcep Toronto FC has signed Honduran midfielder and 2004 MLS MVP Amado Guevara, the club announced on Wednesday afternoon. After trading undisclosed conditional draft picks in 2009 and 2010 to Chivas USA for his rights, Toronto FC signed Guevara to a multi-year contract, with just the first year guaranteed, sources told ESPN.com. Guevara is expected to join Toronto FC in Carson, Calif., where his new team faces David Beckham and the Los Angeles Galaxy on Sunday. Guevara played his final match for Honduran club Motagua last Saturday. Guevara's arrival marks the second high-profile signing for Toronto FC in recent weeks. The club also signed French midfielder Laurent Robert, who has already established himself as a starter for the club. Toronto has had a busy offseason moving out players and clearing salary cap space, including a recent trade with San Jose that sent midfielder Ronnie O'Brien to the Earthquakes for a major allocation (approximately $300,000) and a first-round draft pick in 2008. But in Guevara and Robert, the club is hoping it has added the firepower to escape the Eastern Conference cellar and match its off-the-field success on the pitch. Guevara, 31, spent parts of five seasons in MLS, including four with the MetroStars. During that time, Guevara was one of the league's best midfielders, posting double-digit assist totals for three straight seasons and earning MVP honors in 2004. Toronto sees Guevara as the perfect playmaker to pair alongside MLS rookie of the year and U.S. national team midfielder Maurice Edu. The MetroStars traded Guevara to Chivas USA for its Designated Player slot after the 2006 season but Guevara only played four games with Chivas USA before falling out with head coach Preki. After blocking an attempted trade to Toronto FC, Guevara was promptly loaned out to CD Motagua for the remainder of the 2007 MLS season. Guevara has enjoyed a strong return to the Honduran league, leading Motagua to the Copa UNCAF title in December 2007. Guevara's arrival in Toronto will reunite him with former MetroStars and Red Bulls head coach Mo Johnston, who is now Toronto FC's director of soccer after leaving his position as the team's head coach. John Carver has stepped in as Toronto's new head coach. Ives Galarcep covers MLS for ESPNsoccernet.
  12. From KW Record Local sports: The needs of struggling Newcastle leave Edgar unavailable to Canada March 11, 2008 By JOSH BROWN RECORD STAFF Posted 4:40 p.m. Newcastle United needs David Edgar more than Canada’s Olympic soccer team. At least that’s the message coming from northeast England, as the professional club battles to avoid relegation from the Premiership. Today, the Canadian Soccer Association announced its roster that will battle for a berth in this summer’s Olympics, and Edgar, a Kitchener native, didn’t make the cut. “It’s too bad because he would have definitely been a huge part of this team,” said Canadian Under-23 head coach Nick Dasovic. “David is a player that is involved with a Premiership club in England, so I was trying to get him very hard.” But the Magpies are struggling mightily this season and are just three points away from being relegated to the Championship. And that has left skipper Kevin Keegan skeptical about loaning out one of his prized defensive prospects. “Obviously I wanted to go but circumstances here ... they can’t let me go at the minute because I might be needed,” Edgar said when reached in England. “It’s disappointing that I can’t go but right now I’ve got to focus on Newcastle as well.” Dasovic tried repeatedly to get the centre back to play in the eight-team Olympic qualifier, which begins today in Carson, California. Canada is in a pool with Mexico, Haiti and Guatemala. Panama, Honduras, Cuba and the United States make up the other. The top two teams after round robin play move on to the semi-finals later this month and the finalists are Beijing-bound. Canada’s men’s team last qualified for the Olympics in 1984. Dasovic sent two requests to Newcastle and even tried to work out a deal where Edgar could fly in for some games and return to suit up for pro club if needed, but had no luck. “I understand club situations, I played in Europe, I played in North America,” Dasovic said. “I know both logistics, but again, it doesn’t really make a lot of sense to me.” Edgar captains Newcastle’s reserve squad and has been stellar all season. But he has yet to make his mark with the first team, even though the club has been mired with injuries and hasn’t won a Premier game since mid-December. “It is difficult not being on the first team,” said Edgar. “Really for the last four or five reserve games I’ve been playing some of the best football I’ve played since I got my chance with the first team last season.” The 20-year-old had a meeting with Keegan about a week and a half ago to talk about his future with the club. According to Edgar, the manager was supportive and wants to see the youngster in action but is reluctant to slip him in the lineup at the moment since Newcastle is under immense pressure to avoid relegation. “It’s not a very good mood around the city right now,” said Edgar. “It’s a confidence issue at the minute. We haven’t been playing that bad lately but as soon as one goal goes in, then our heads go down. But everyone is confident that we’re going to be safe.” Edgar plans to finish out the schedule with Newcastle and then return home to rest during the off-season. “I have to hope the boys do well out there and qualify and then hopefully I can do enough to get on the team for the actual Olympics,” he said. jbrown@therecord.com
  13. I started this comments. Who ever used my name 2 hours later is a puzzle to me and I do not appreciate it.
  14. From KW Record http://news.therecord.com/News/CanadaWorld/article/297328 Kitchener's David Edgar aims to start for Newcastle January 19, 2008 The Canadian Press NEWCASTLE, ENGLAND Canadian defender David Edgar had no problems with former Newcastle United manager Sam Allardyce. And he is looking forward to working with the new boss, Kevin Keegan. Edgar's goal is the same -- Newcastle's reserve team captain just wants to play. The 20-year-old from Kitchener has made the senior bench nine times this season, getting on the field once as a substitute. He finds himself a little in soccer limbo, not seeing first-team action but so close to the squad that he is deemed too valuable to do without. On Jan. 9, he met with Allardyce in the morning to talk about whether he might go out on loan, to get regular playing time. Allardyce said no, because the team was missing players at the African Cup of Nations. "But I left the meeting feeling good, I knew what was happening and where he saw me (fit in)." Later that day he was shopping when he got a call that Allardyce was history. "I had to laugh, I couldn't believe it,'' he said. The former Bolton boss had only been in charge for 24 games. A week later, Newcastle named Keegan, a former star player and beloved ex-manager on Tyneside, as the new boss. "I thought they would have had someone right away. But they took their time and got a good manager, a very good manager,'' Edgar said in an interview yesterday at the club café. Allardyce left nothing to chance, bringing in an army of experts and helpers. "We've got almost as much staff as we do players now,'' Edgar said. There were ice baths after every training session and special protein drinks before and after games. Allardyce removed two seats from the stands so he could have TV monitors installed at his seat in the directors' box. "I really liked him, I got along with him, '' Edgar said. "I thought he was a good coach, I enjoyed my time with him.'' But Keegan offers the Canadian a clean slate. Edgar was at the gym early Thursday when Keegan arrived. The new manager introduced himself and started talking about Canada. "He was asking about ice hockey. I told him I played ice hockey and he said he's been to the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. He said it's a beautiful country.'' Keegan is his fifth manager at Newcastle, following Sir Bobby Robson, Graeme Souness, Glenn Roeder and Allardyce. Bolton Wanderers are the visitors to St. James' Park on Saturday and Edgar has been included in the 18-man game squad. That means showing up at the stadium in a suit, but it doesn't guarantee dressing for the game. Two of those 18 don't make the starting 11 or the bench. With Habib Beye and Abdoulaye Faye (Senegal), Geremi (Cameroon) and Obafemi Martins (Nigeria) away at the African Cup of Nations, the Newcastle roster is thin. Not to mention suspensions to Nicky Butt, Alan Smith and Emre. Until everyone returns, Edgar probably won't get the loan move he desires. The Football League Championship, one level below the Premier League, is his likely destination. "That's what I need to do, to get the experience of playing -- hopefully in the Championship -- somewhere where I'm playing week in and week out against men, in games that matter all the time.'' Edgar, who is under contract through the 2008-09 season, is appreciated at St. James' Park. Peter Beardsley, the former England and Newcastle star now on the coaching staff there, has watched him rise through the ranks since Edgar arrived at 14 in 2001. "He's done very well,'' said Beardsley, whose playing career included a stint with the Vancouver Whitecaps. "He's obviously getting a chance now. . . . It's great news. He did really well in the academy for us and we were very impressed, and happy he's still here and very close to the first team. "He's a great lad, he deserves all the success he's getting.'' Keegan calls Newcastle a "very special club'' and Edgar has seen firsthand the fanaticism of the fans. "They're something different, something special. It takes a lot to please them but when they're happy, they're happy. When they're not happy, obviously everyone knows. A great set of fans. We don't have to play to fill our stadium. It's always going to be filled week in or week out.'' Toronto Maple Leafs fans might identify with the Toon Army. There is the Leaf Nation and the Geordie Nation. Both teams have rich histories but silverware has eluded them for decades. Edgar has long known about Newcastle, given he has plenty of relatives here and his father Eddie played goal (making one appearance in the FA Cup in 1976) for the team. Edgar Jr. made his senior debut at fullback against Bolton on Boxing Day in 2006 and earned a place in the Toon Army's hearts days later when he scored on a long-range screamer to give Newcastle a 2-2 draw with Manchester United in his home debut Jan. 1. Edgar, who has started in three games and come on as a substitute in two, wants to make new memories. "It's been a year now. I'm never going to forget it but I kind of want to put it in the past,'' the six-foot-two defender said of the goal. Watching from the sidelines is never easy. But he is biding his time. "It's tough, I'm not going to lie and say it's easy. It's tough not playing. Just being so close but not playing. Making the bench but not playing. . . . It is a stressful game but I love it.'' He also relishes being a member of the same team as the likes of Michael Owen, Damien Duff, Shay Given and others. "I don't take it for granted and I work hard every training session.'' Edgar has made Newcastle his home. He just bought a house, which he shares with his bulldog puppy Lola. The young Canadian says he gets recognized in town but says it's easier for him than most. "It's fine. I don't get mobbed or anything like that, like some of the players,'' he said with a laugh. "Some people recognize me and some people don't. And even if they do, they're good. They'll just say hello or good game or good goal against Man U. They still say that.''
  15. Houston Dynamo coach Kinnear gets contract extension through 2010 http://news.therecord.com/Wire/Sports_Wire/Soccer_Wire/article/283933 December 17, 2007 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Canadian Press, 2007 HOUSTON - Houston Dynamo head coach Dominic Kinnear, who led his team to back-to-back MLS championships, received a contract extension through 2010 on Monday. "I'm happy to know I'll be involved with this organization and players for years to come," said Kinnear, who had one season left on his previous deal. "I am really fortunate to continue this opportunity." Kinnear was named head coach of the San Jose Earthquakes in 2004. Two years later, the team relocated to Houston and became the Dynamo. He was MLS Coach of the Year in 2005 before the Earthquakes moved to Houston. Kinnear has a 53-30-41 record, including a 15-8-7 mark this past season. In his four years as a head coach, Kinnear is seventh on the all-time MLS list for wins and has the second-highest winning percentage, all time, among MLS coaches at .593. "We think Dominic is the best coach in the league," Dynamo president Oliver Luck said. "We are delighted to know Dom will continue to lead the Men in Orange, and this gives us a great opportunity to bring home additional championships." Houston beat the New England Revolution in November to win its second straight championship.
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