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Robert

Would a 4 Nations Tournament fly in Canada?

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On 12/24/2018 at 12:09 PM, socceronly said:

Exactly. So end thread until nothing happens.  Until then.... 

No problem. Let's pick this discussion up again after March 7, 2019, and see how many international matches Canada, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Cameroon have played. Fair enough?

February 28, 2019  -  Australia v New Zealand
March 3, 2019  -  Argentina v New Zealand
March 6, 2019  -  Korea Republic v New Zealand

Football Ferns Head Coach Tom Sermanni said the seven day tournament will be ideal preparation for the format of the FIFA Women’s World Cup where they will meet Canada, the Netherlands and Cameroon.

“We are really looking forward to being part of this tournament,” said Sermanni.  “To be able to play three world-class sides over seven days in three different locations will be great preparation for what we will face in France at the World Cup. We only have six months until the tournament begins so to have secured quality opposition, along with playing the USA in May, we are happy with our build-up to the tournament.”

JANUARI 2019

 

Cape Town Stadium, Kaapstad, Zuid-Afrika

 

FRIENDLY

SATURDAY 19 JANUARY 2019 AT 20:45 - LE HAVRE - OCÉANE STADIUM

FRANCE/UNITED STATES

 

Women's friendly
Saturday,
2019-04-06
13:45
Sweden Club logo Sweden - : - Club logo Germany Germany

 

This edit was done on Christmas Day, and shows that all the Pot 1 countries at the World Cup draw, with the exception of Canada have already announced at least one international friendly in preparation for France 2019. When is the CSA finally going to act like a Pot 1 nation?

The 6 Pot 1 Countries:

France - January 19, 2019 versus U.S.A.

U.S.A. - January 19, 2019 versus France

Germany - April 6, 2019 versus Sweden

England - February 27, 2019 versus Brazil

Canada - ______________________________

Australia - February 28, 2019 Versus New Zealand

 

Edited by Robert

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31 minutes ago, Robert said:

No problem. Let's pick this discussion up again after March 7, 2019, and see how many international matches Canada, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Cameroon have played. Fair enough?

 February 28, 2019  -  Australia v New Zealand
March 3, 2019  -  Argentina v New Zealand
March 6, 2019  -  Korea Republic v New Zealand
 

Unless weather is garbage, we'll play 1 more match than New Zealand during that same period. 

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On 12/24/2018 at 3:28 PM, Robert said:

No problem. Let's pick this discussion up again after March 7, 2019, and see how many international matches Canada, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Cameroon have played. Fair enough?

February 28, 2019  -  Australia v New Zealand
March 3, 2019  -  Argentina v New Zealand
March 6, 2019  -  Korea Republic v New Zealand

Football Ferns Head Coach Tom Sermanni said the seven day tournament will be ideal preparation for the format of the FIFA Women’s World Cup where they will meet Canada, the Netherlands and Cameroon.

“We are really looking forward to being part of this tournament,” said Sermanni.  “To be able to play three world-class sides over seven days in three different locations will be great preparation for what we will face in France at the World Cup. We only have six months until the tournament begins so to have secured quality opposition, along with playing the USA in May, we are happy with our build-up to the tournament.”

JANUARI 2019

 

Cape Town Stadium, Kaapstad, Zuid-Afrika

 

FRIENDLY

a Hap[pSATURDAY 19 JANUARY 2019 AT 20:45 - LE HAVRE - OCÉANE STADIUM

FRANCE/UNITED STATES

 

Women's friendly
Saturday,
2019-04-06
13:45
Sweden Club logo Sweden - : - Club logo Germany Germany

 

This edit was done on Christmas Day, and shows that all the Pot 1 countries at the World Cup draw, with the exception of Canada have already announced at least one international friendly in preparation for France 2019. When is the CSA finally going to act like a Pot 1 nation?

The 6 Pot 1 Countries:

France - January 19, 2019 versus U.S.A.

U.S.A. - January 19, 2019 versus France

Germany - April 6, 2019 versus Sweden

England - February 27, 2019 versus Brazil

Canada - ______________________________

Australia - February 28, 2019 Versus New Zealand

Just one more post.

I would like to wish the Canadian Women's National Team a Happy Christmas and a Championship-Winning New Year.

Edited by Robert

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Devil's advocate - given that our federation/association has a small fraction of the staff of Pot 1 countries (England, France, Germany and the USA - even the Aussies are 250% ours)... our women have probably spent more time in camp in the past 10-15 years than all of them. When will the best countries in the women's game act like us?

We'll have plenty of friendlies and be one of the best prepared teams as usual.

Association resources directed to our national team is not our problem. If anything it's our addiction.

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12 hours ago, Vic said:

Devil's advocate - given that our federation/association has a small fraction of the staff of Pot 1 countries (England, France, Germany and the USA - even the Aussies are 250% ours)... our women have probably spent more time in camp in the past 10-15 years than all of them. When will the best countries in the women's game act like us?

We'll have plenty of friendlies and be one of the best prepared teams as usual.

Association resources directed to our national team is not our problem. If anything it's our addiction.

How prophetic, Vic.

FIFA just confirmed what you just stated on its website today. Check it out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUfh1d_RSOQ&feature=player_embedded

https://www.fifa.com/womensworldcup/news/when-bochum-bowed-to-the-brilliant-bleues

FIFA WOMEN'S WORLD CUP 2019™

When Bochum bowed to the brilliant Bleues

27 Dec 2018

 
 
 
  • Relive France’s greatest Women’s World Cup performance
  • Les Bleues beat higher-ranked Canada 4-0 en route to 2011 semis
  • Canucks coach Carolina Morace: "France played the perfect game"

France go into next year’s FIFA Women’s World Cup™ with justifiably high hopes. Yet while their national squad and club sides are stronger than ever, Les Bleues’ pedigree at the global finals is comparatively modest.

The French, in fact, have only qualified for three of the tournament’s previous seven editions – and rarely looked like title contenders. The exception to this rule came at Germany 2011, when they produced some stellar displays en route to reaching the semi-finals for the first and, to date, only time.

An impressive campaign peaked with this spectacular 4-0 demolition of Canada, a team that had arrived ranked sixth in the world – one place above Les Bleues – and with genuine ambitions of bringing home the trophy. As it was, the then CONCACAF champions crumbled in the face of a dazzling French display, illuminated by goals from Camille Abily, Elodie Thomis and Gaetane Thiney (2).

Thiney became the first Bleues player to bag a Women’s World Cup brace, and her second goal - a superb long-range strike off the inside of the right-hand post - was the pick of France’s four.

"I made a lot of sacrifices to be where I am today, and it is a big pleasure for me to score two goals in this kind of stadium with a great atmosphere," she said afterwards, marvelling at the 20,000-plus crowd in Bochum’s Ruhrstadion. "We were outstanding today. Everything went right for us."

Canada, meanwhile, were consigned to elimination by the defeat. All that was left was to graciously applaud their flawless conquerors. As the Canucks’ coach, Carolina Morace, said: "France didn’t make a single mistake. They played the perfect game."

 

Edited by Robert

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Playing practice matches in Nicosia's GSP Stadium in front of 50 & 30 people and at Rome's Mancini Park in front of 25, 25 & 50 just doesn't replicate the playing conditions that players will experience at a World Cup Final match, which is probably also the reason that foreign FA's aren't too interested in organizing internationals against Canada, because we just don't have the kind of drawing power that we enjoy when playing in Canada. Hence the reason for this thread.

A 4-Nations tournament would also give the Great Canadian fan-base the opportunity to send their heroines off to France.

Edited by Robert

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15 hours ago, Vic said:

We'll have plenty of friendlies and be one of the best prepared teams as usual.

Association resources directed to our national team is not our problem. If anything it's our addiction.

As I was saying, we played 16 games in the six months leading up to that France game, and lost only one, by a goal to the USA. We were also in residency for most of it.

We are always one of the best prepared teams in the world.

We've played just one game in Quebec in a decade. The tournament is in France in a French environment and culture. Playing in Montreal or Quebec City would be a perfect fit. 

But even if it was technically possible given the time window, which I don't believe it is even close, it would be very risky and the diverted resources would have an impact on our preparation. 

There are only so many CSA support eggs in the basket. If KHM or the association wants it to happen I'm sure they could burn half of them and half-ass something in a couple months. But I'll bet they invest them in other ways, like finding a number of quality opponents and funding and coordinating camps and those matches.

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2 hours ago, Vic said:

We've played just one game in Quebec in a decade. The tournament is in France in a French environment and culture. Playing in Montreal or Quebec City would be a perfect fit.

I don't think we need to concern ourselves too much with playing against France. The earliest we can meet the French is if we finish third in our group, and happen to be one of the four-best third place finishers, and even then all the stars still need to align in order to get to play the hosts in the round of 16. Like who wants to find themselves in that position. We need to focus on our three opponents, two of which we know a fair bit about, and one we know almost nothing about. Why do you think the Dutch have chosen to play against South Africa in Cape Town on January 19th?

If, as you claim, Canada is "always one of the best prepared teams in the world," then why on Earth won't you prepare for the unknown, especially since they are our first opponent? Why would you run the risk of being surprised in your first match? The last time we played an African team, Nigeria, at the 2011 World Cup, what happened? Yeah, I'm sure that you, being the great CSA defense attorney that you are, will come up with a host of lame excuses why "one of the always best prepared teams" lost that game, but I'm sick to death of hearing lame excuses being used to defend the CSA. Will the CSA EVER look in the mirror and take responsibility for the pile of negative results we have accumulated over the years?

If organizing international matches in Canada is too difficult a task for Mt. Pete, then is it too much to ask him to pick up the phone and call an African colleague and set something up against a team similar to Cameroon? Like really, what is Mt. Pete waiting for?

FYI - It's an interesting fact that no African country has ever taken part in the Algarve Cup.

Edited by Robert

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African countries don't play similar. That would be like playing Egypt to ready for Nigeria, or Norway to prepare for Spain. I guess if a southern or central African country wanted to prepare for playing white people they could play Norway. But the style of play is completely different and on the men's side Joshua King who plays for Bournemouth has been the best Norwegian every time I've seen them play.

South Africa was a Dutch colony and Dutch is an official language. Cape Town is also the most beautiful city in the world and has a beautiful climate in January, especially compared to Amsterdam. And it's a cheap destination. Where Canadian's go to places like Cuba, Europeans go to places like Cape Town. Almost everyone I ran into in January was German, Dutch or English.

The KNVB has ten times the employees as the CSA and money out the yang. Think Hockey Canada. Now think of the Netherlands Ice Hockey association. That's us compared to them operationally.

And actually I didn't suggest playing France. I said a French speaking environment in Quebec would simulate the environment in France. But seeing as how you mention it, when someone hosts you then you owe them a hosting in return, and I'll bet we owe France a handful.

The results in 2011 (including Nigeria) are 100% attributed to Morace, nothing more and nothing less. Not planning or preparation which were pretty much the best in the world and I don't think anyone would argue against either.

Last one - negative results we've accumulated over the years? Two Olympic bronze medals and a Pot 1 ranking? For a 35 million northern snow covered country with no league and limited funds? I understand taking issue with how we spend our money and what we focus on, but since the amateurism two decades ago on the women's side I've never heard anyone talk about a buildup of negative results. 

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1 hour ago, Vic said:

African countries don't play similar. That would be like playing Egypt to ready for Nigeria, or Norway to prepare for Spain. I guess if a southern or central African country wanted to prepare for playing white people they could play Norway. But the style of play is completely different and on the men's side Joshua King who plays for Bournemouth has been the best Norwegian every time I've seen them play.

South Africa was a Dutch colony and Dutch is an official language. Cape Town is also the most beautiful city in the world and has a beautiful climate in January, especially compared to Amsterdam. And it's a cheap destination. Where Canadian's go to places like Cuba, Europeans go to places like Cape Town. Almost everyone I ran into in January was German, Dutch or English.

The KNVB has ten times the employees as the CSA and money out the yang. Think Hockey Canada. Now think of the Netherlands Ice Hockey association. That's us compared to them operationally.

And actually I didn't suggest playing France. I said a French speaking environment in Quebec would simulate the environment in France. But seeing as how you mention it, when someone hosts you then you owe them a hosting in return, and I'll bet we owe France a handful.

The results in 2011 (including Nigeria) are 100% attributed to Morace, nothing more and nothing less. Not planning or preparation which were pretty much the best in the world and I don't think anyone would argue against either.

Last one - negative results we've accumulated over the years? Two Olympic bronze medals and a Pot 1 ranking? For a 35 million northern snow covered country with no league and limited funds? I understand taking issue with how we spend our money and what we focus on, but since the amateurism two decades ago on the women's side I've never heard anyone talk about a buildup of negative results. 

I'm impressed that you possess such an intimate knowledge of the different styles of play by African women's national teams. Obviously, I'm way out of my league on this one, so I'll conveniently move on to the next point,

French is the official language in Algeria, Benin, Burkina, Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central, African, Republic, Chad, Comoros, Côte, d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial, Guinea, Guinea, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritius, Morocco, Niger, Republic of the Congo, Reunion, Rawanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Togo and Tunisia. No shortage here. Take your pick. Like you said, they're all cheap destinations, and if its proper etiquette to offer a return match, then he, why not? I'm sure that most African women would love the chance to visit either Montreal or Quebec City, the second and third most beautiful cities in the world, and play in the inaugural Canadian $ Nations Cup. 

And yes, sadly the KNVB isn't blessed with having Mt. Pete, Mr. 0% responsible for any negative results, as a member of its staff, and thus Canada will, as always, be a much-better prepared team than the Dutch at this year's World Cup Final. The thing that I really like to know is; like who was the fool who hired that Italian bimbo in the first place? Pass the mirror, please!

Edited by Robert

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Morace would have been hired by Maestracci, who was before Montagliani and Reed. Montopoli isn't the president. 

The Dutch national team gets the fruits of money generated by the men's team and some stunningly run women's programs like Ajax. But even still we'll likely have comparable or better prep as in the past. I'm not a big fan of the all-in national teams approach, but based on the past decade I don't see any indicators we'll switch tack.

I read a great piece by an American professor a couple weeks back about the Americans going after Meng Wangzhou when there were hordes of companies who paid billions of dollars in fines for circumventing the Iran embargo. One French bank alone was fined 10 billion. And scores of well-known American companies paid through the nose as well. And in no case did they ever go after an individual. The writer's point was if you're going to go to a personal level, start domestically so the optics aren't bad.

Similarly to the organization/individual split, I get anyone having issues with an organization, but why the Peter Montopoli thing? Is it just because he's the figurehead or is it something from the past?

When he was hired his job was defined as: "in charge of management and administration of staff, strategic and operational planning, communication with the provincial and territorial associations, and marketing and revenue development. He added that an additional part of his role will be fundraising."

Outside the FIFA tournaments which were one off's that's pretty much what I would have guessed. Perhaps that's indirectly related to hosting through the marketing angle but I imagine he's more involved in sponsorships and official partners. I expect it would be the coach picking opponents for cup preparation, can't remember his exact words but KHM may have even implied that.

Who knows, we may play an African country or more. I'd think it might be somewhere like in Europe though. Seem to remember we played a lot there in the buildup the last time the Cup was hosted in Europe.

Edited by Vic

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2 hours ago, Vic said:

Morace would have been hired by Maestracci, who was before Montagliani and Reed. Montopoli isn't the president.

Similarly to the organization/individual split, I get anyone having issues with an organization, but why the Peter Montopoli thing? Is it just because he's the figurehead or is it something from the past?

When he was hired his job was defined as: "in charge of management and administration of staff, strategic and operational planning, communication with the provincial and territorial associations, and marketing and revenue development. He added that an additional part of his role will be fundraising."

Outside the FIFA tournaments which were one off's that's pretty much what I would have guessed. Perhaps that's indirectly related to hosting through the marketing angle but I imagine he's more involved in sponsorships and official partners. I expect it would be the coach picking opponents for cup preparation, can't remember his exact words but KHM may have even implied that.

Who knows, we may play an African country or more. I'd think it might be somewhere like in Europe though. Seem to remember we played a lot there in the buildup the last time the Cup was hosted in Europe.

This is what I found regarding Mt. Pete's job description. It is clear that he had served in various capacities for the CSA prior to being appointed "General Secretary," on March 25, 2008:

https://www.canadasoccer.com/association-appoints-peter-montopoli-as-new-general-secretary-p146760

Association appoints Peter Montopoli as new general secretary

Posted on 25 March 2008 in Canadian Soccer Association

The Canadian Soccer Association announced today that Peter Montopoli has been named the Association's new General Secretary. Montopoli will manage the daily operations of the Association and act as a spokesperson for the organisation in the corporate sector, with the government, and in the soccer community.

"Soccer has such tremendous potential in this country," says Canadian Soccer Association General Secretary Peter Montopoli. "We will all work together to ensure this sport receives the world-class treatment it deserves in Canada."

Montopoli most recently led the Canadian Soccer Association's way in the largest single-sport event in Canadian history, the FIFA U-20 World Cup Canada 2007. As National Event Director for the 52-match tournament, he helped Canada 2007 draw close to 1.2-million spectators, engage 469.5-million cumulative television viewers, and spark $259-million in economic impact.

Montopoli has more than 25 years of extensive sport leadership experience and success. Before joining the Canadian Soccer Association, Montopoli was the Chief Marketing Officer for Skate Canada where his milestones included the 2001 World Figure Skating Championships, an event that drew a record 215,000 spectators. He previously worked at Basketball Canada and the Ontario Basketball Association.

In his new role with the Canadian Soccer Association, Montopoli will be in charge of management and administration of staff, strategic and operational planning, communication with the provincial and territorial associations, and marketing and revenue development. His first duties will include the implementation of the Association's new strategic plan and collaborate with the new Technical Director in the roll out of the Association's new long-term development plan, Wellness to World Cup.

https://www.sportsnet.ca/soccer/canada-montopoli-0/

Montopoli named CSA general secretary

OTTAWA — After a successful effort as event director of last year’s FIFA U-20 World Cup, the Canadian Soccer Association has named Peter Montopoli as its general secretary.

The announcement was made Tuesday after a two-month search where the CSA looked at 32 applicants — all but three from Canada. Montopoli will manage the CSA’s daily operations and act as a spokesperson for the organization in the corporate sector, with the government and in the soccer community.

The position replaced that of the chief executive officer.

Fred Nykamp was announced as the organization’s CEO last May, but his hiring didn’t receive board approval, leading to a lawsuit for wrongful hiring and firing that was settled in January. Kevan Pipe was fired as the organization’s chief operating officer in November 2006.

Montopoli said he’s excited about leading the organization along with the CSA executive committee and board and their partners.

"Obviously it’s a big task, there’s a long road in front of us," Montopoli said during a conference call. "But I think if we’re able to build the synergies with everyone working together and I think that’s the key — everyone working together moving forward — I think great things can happen and many things can be accomplished."

Montopoli has previously worked at Skate Canada, Canada Basketball and the Ontario Basketball Association. As director of last year’s 52-match U-20 tournament, the Ottawa resident helped the event bring in almost 1.2 million spectators.

"We did all work together and we set records in this country that may never ever be broken again," Montopoli said. "With that, I think it shows it bodes well for the sport of soccer that the interest is there.

"We just need the opportunities now and the organization to take a leadership position in moving forward."

Montopoli, who will work closely with new technical director Stephen Hart, will also be in charge of management and administration of staff, strategic and operational planning, communication with the provincial and territorial associations, and marketing and revenue development.

It also appears to me that Mt. Pete was very much involved in the hiring of Carolina Morace, on February 5, 2009:

https://www.canadasoccer.com/carolina-morace-named-new-women-rsquo-s-head-coach-p146487

Carolina Morace named new women’s head coach

Posted on 5 February 2009 in Women's National Team / Olympic Team

The Canadian Soccer Association announced today the hiring of Carolina Morace as head coach of the women's national program. Mrs. Morace, who was unveiled today at a press conference in Toronto, assumes control immediately before the team's two-week camp in California which begins this Sunday.

We have embarked on a new era in women's soccer in Canada, says Canadian Soccer Association General Secretary Peter Montopoli. Coach Carolina Morace's hiring underlies our determination to put forth one of the best programs in the world. Mrs. Morace has but one direction: to lead Canada to victory.

Mrs. Morace inherits a Canadian team that came within an extra-time goal of knocking off the number-one ranked USA at the 2008 Women's Olympic Football Tournament. The team has participated in each of the last four FIFA Women's World Cups, finishing ninth in 2007 and fourth in 2003. She will also head the program's U-20 team, a team that recently won gold at the 2008 CONCACAF Women's Under-20 Championship over USA.

My objective is to lead Canada to an Olympic or FIFA Women's World Cup medal and to ensure that Canada plays at the highest level of international football, says coach Morace. We must all work together to achieve this one common goal. Everyone must do their part in this so that our goal will become a reality.

Mrs. Morace is the former head coach of Italy's national and youth teams, a post she held from 2000 to 2005. During her tenure, she led Italy's top team to a fifth and eighth place finish at the European Championships (2001 and 2005).

Mrs. Morace was also a fantastic player, scoring 105 times for the national team in 153 international games. She took part in six European Championships as well as the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991.

Most recently, Ms. Morace was named a world ambassador for women's football by FIFA president Joseph Blatter. She puts on countless clinics around the world and has been teaching football at the University of Motor Science in Rome since 2007.

Canada, whose title sponsor is Winners and presenting sponsor is Teck, has an all-time record of 89 wins, 30 draws and 103 losses since 1986. It has a record of 33 wins, eight draws and 20 losses in FIFA and CONCACAF competitions, including top-10 finishes at each of the last three FIFA senior women's events.

https://www.cp24.com/new-coach-brings-passion-blue-chip-resume-to-canadian-women-s-soccer-team-1.367397

New coach brings passion, blue-chip resume to Canadian women's soccer team
Neil Davidson, The Canadian Press 
Published Thursday, February 5, 2009 6:46PM EST 

TORONTO - Canada added some star power to its soccer lineup Thursday, naming Italian Carolina Morace as national women's coach.

"We aren't probably as aware of Carolina as the rest of the world is, but as far as a women's footballer, she's up there with the best of the last century and the most incredible players to have played the game," said former Canadian international Andrea Neil, who played against Morace and will now be part of her coaching staff.

"Now that's crossed over to the other side of the sideline where her coaching resume is sterling. For us to have her be a part of our program, to hopefully take it to the next level, is an incredible signing."

Morace, who turned 45 Thursday, has a blue-chip resume indeed. As a player, she scored 105 goals in 153 appearances for Italy and was named world female player of the year in 1995. Five years later, she was chosen one of the top four players of the century.

She took part in six European Championships as well as the inaugural Women's World Cup in 1991, when she became the first woman to score a hat trick at the tournament.

In 1990, she scored four goals for Italy against England at Wembley. And she set an Italian club record when she bagged seven goals in Modena's 10-0 win over Calendasco in January 1997.

Morace coached the Italian women's team for six years and became the first woman to coach a men's pro team, when she took over Serie C side Viterbese in 1999. Morace, who made her home in Rome, has also worked as a colour commentator for the highest level of the men's game -- Serie A -- in Italy, as well as the men's World Cup in 1998 and European Championship in 2000.

"Carolina will now be the face for women's soccer in Canada," said Peter Montopoli, general secretary of the Canadian Soccer Association. "She will represent over 370,000 female players."

That number -- the third highest participation rate in women's soccer -- was one of the reasons she was attracted to the job, Morace said.

Morace, who is also a qualified lawyer in Italy, saw that talent pool when she visited Canada several times to hold soccer camps.

"That challenge is really what drove me to come here because I truly think we can win a medal," she said through an interpreter.

Morace's first order of business is a camp for 26 players starting Saturday in Los Angeles. The roster includes captain Christine Sinclair, Erin McLeod, Melissa Tancredi, Martina Franko, Karina LeBlanc, Amy Walsh and Canadian under-20 player of the year Jonelle Filigno.

The team will reassemble in March ahead of the Cyprus Cup tournament.

The willowy Morace (pronounced mohr-AH-chee) promises to be a force of nature. Her introductory news conference at BMO Field was a mixture of cautious English and machine gun-like Italian, sometimes mashed together.

"The CSA wants to win and I agree," she said in English.

Morace succeeds Even Pellerud, inheriting a team that ranks 11th in the world -- one spot above Italy. The Norwegian native stepped down after leading Canada to the quarter-finals of the Beijing Olympics last summer, losing to the eventual champion Americans in extra time.

Pellerud arrived as a star in his own right, having led Norway to the World Cup title. He remade the program, developing a generation of talent while helping build a professional framework to allow them to flourish,

He has since taken a job as head of the women's program with the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation.

"He really put Canada on the international map," said Neil.

A stoic Scandinavian, there was nevertheless a flinty side to Pellerud. He also had a dry sense of humour.

Emotions will run high with the passionate outspoken Morace, who upon being introduced said Canada should be higher in the world rankings than 11th. Her goal is to work hard -- "My philosophy is work. Work, work and work" -- have fun and above all win.

Morace quickly showed that she is not afraid of speaking her mind, saying one of the reasons she left Italy was that women's soccer is not held in high esteem there.

Asked what it was like coaching a men's team, she replied through an interpreter: "In my experience I found it a lot easier coaching men than women, because men just listen to me and do what they're told whereas women keep asking 'Why should I do it?'

"You gentleman must know women," she added dryly.

Unlike Pellerud, who made Vancouver home, Morace will be based out of Toronto. Montopoli said it was too early to say whether she will follow Pellerud's example in setting up a residency camp for the team.

Neil says Canada has shown it can consistently do well against teams ranked No. 8 and lower. The next quest is to be consistent against the top teams in the world -- and win medals.

"But in order to do that, you have to have results against everybody. So no longer just the one-off result will do the job. That will help in the rankings, but at the same time this team needs to contend to be a top-four team in the world."

Morace, who will also coach the under-20 team, will draw upon the help of longtime assistant Betty Bavagnoli.

"She know my methodology and she is very calm. And I am very nervous. We balance very well," said Morace.

Neil retired in December 2007 after 18 years with the Canadian national program.

"Andrea for us, is important," said Morace.

Morace made a point of posing with both assistants when the news conference ended and photographers rushed to take her photo.

Asked about her philosophy, Morace said a coach must know every system. "The characteristics of the players will determine the style of play," she said through an interpreter.

Morace coached Italy from 2000 to 2005, helping the team to runner-up finishes in the competitive European confederation in 2001 and 2005.

The CSA began its job search in October, drawing more than 50 candidates around the world. Montopoli said Morace was on his radar right from the get-go.

Montopoli believes Morace's prominence in women' soccer -- FIFA named her an ambassador to the sport -- can only help Canada's bid to host the 2015 women's World Cup.

Subsequently, Mt. Pete's involvement in the "Morace affair" was summarized as follows:

https://www.cbc.ca/sports/soccer/csa-reaches-out-to-women-s-team-coach-morace-1.1056185

CSA reaches out to women's team coach Morace

CBC Sports · February 9, 2011

If the Canadian Soccer Association has its way, Carolina Morace will still be coach of the Canadian women's team after the 2011 FIFA World Cup.

To that end the CSA, soccer's governing body in Canada, has reached out to Morace and is trying to set up a face-to-face meeting with the Italian-born manager in order to listen to her concerns and try to convince her to reconsider her resignation.

Morace, 47, recently told the CSA that she planned to quit following the World Cup, which runs from June 26 to July 17 in Germany. Morace was hired in February 2009 and her contract runs through the 2012 Olympics.

The Canadian team has thrived under Morace, qualifying for this summer's World Cup and re-establishing itself as one of the best sides in the women's game. But Morace was clearly unhappy, citing differences with the CSA over the long-term strategy of the women's program in her resignation letter.

CSA general secretary Peter Montopoli said the organization is eager to speak to the coach in person, and is trying to set up a meeting even if it means going to Italy, where Morace and the women's team will start training later this week.

"From [our] perspective, what we need to do is learn a little more about her concerns," Montopoli told CBCSports.ca on Wednesday. "We want to sit down with her and iron out the situation and what the difficulties may be so that we can put the program back to where it needs in order for it to be successful."

Stay on after World Cup

Montopoli, who claimed he was unaware of what specific issues Morace has, said the CSA's goal is to try to convince the Italian to remain as coach after the World Cup.

"That's our intent. That's really the spirit of why we wish to engage in talks with her … Absolutely, that's what we're looking to do," Montopli stated.

Morace was cryptic in her explanation for quitting, but some players have suggested the CSA has stifled her and interfered with how she has run the women's program.

If that's the way Morace really feels, Montopli wants to address that.

"Certainly, we want to ensure she has the opportunity to [run] the program in accordance with what she needs," he said. "Whatever [training] camps she requires and whatever preparation has to be accordance to her needs, so we have to make sure of that."

The coach's future is complicated by the fact that members of the Canadian women's team voted unanimously to go on strike in support of Morace earlier this week. Captain Christine Sinclair and her teammates have vowed not to play an international game until the issue with Morace has been resolved.

The Canadian team is supposed fly to Rome on Friday for a training camp ahead of the Cyprus Cup, an exhibition tournament it is scheduled to compete in that starts on Feb. 28.

Montopli did not want to address the boycott, reiterating that the CSA is doing all it can to engage in talks with Morace.

Compensation issue

At the same time as the Morace issue has unfolded, the CSA has been dealing with growing unrest amongst the women players over their financial compensation.

The 25 members of the women's team have retained legal counsel over a pay dispute with the CSA and are prepared to file a suit for arbitration with the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada.

The women contend that the Canadian men's team has a fixed-term arrangement with the CSA under which they are compensated on a per game basis. They women say they want a similar deal, instead of receiving what they call ad-hoc compensation from the CSA.

Members of the women's team receive approximately $1,500 a month from Sport Canada. Currently, the players also negotiate compensation with the CSA for each tournament they participate in.

Jim Bunting, lead counsel for the women, previously told CBCSports.ca that, "what the women are looking for is an arrangement that is fixed in term and provides them with predictability as to what their compensation will be."

Montopoli confirmed that the CSA has tabled an offer, but declined to provide any details.

The women are seeking a long-term contract, but a potential sticking point in the negotiations could be how to calculate the compensation they should receive.

Bunting has made several requests of the CSA, asking for documentation of the compensation agreement the organization has with the men's team. He wants that information so he can consider any compensation offer put forth for the women, but thus far the CSA has not provided him with the documents.

"We fully understand the concept of multiple years," Montopoli said. "It's the mechanism on how to do that — I think that's what we're working through with their lawyers … in terms of what [the compensation formula] should be."

Multi-year compensation proposal

In a Jan. 13 letter to the CSA, Bunting wrote that the women's team tabled a multi-year compensation proposal to Montopoli in February 2009. The letter went on to paint Montopoli and the CSA as dragging their feet and not responding in a timely fashion.

Montopoli said it's not as easy as signing a cheque and giving it to the players, and that certain organizational procedures must be followed.

"It's hard to say, as part of the negotiations, what's the right speed, and what's the wrong speed," Montopli said. "I understand what they are saying [but] there are certain avenues and procedures with which that we have to work in terms of how things are done."

The timing of both disputes isn't ideal. Canada is competing against Zimbabwe for the right to host the 2015 Women's World Cup and is set to present its bid book to FIFA next week. But Montopli doesn't think the disputes would adversely affect Canada's chances.

"Having worked on the bid all this time, the bid does stand on its own with FUIFA, there's no doubt about that. From a bid perspective, that's fine," Montopli asserted.

He's also hopeful both the coaching and compensation issues can be quickly and amicably resolved.

"I am optimistic that we'll get there and everybody will be happy and supportive of the resolutions that we'll get to in time with the players," Montopli said.

No matter how you cut it, CSA coaches and National Team Players have had multiple issues with Mt. Pete, and obviously I'm not alone when I say that Canadian soccer would be much better off without Mt. Pete at the helm of the CSA!

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There's a more relevant women soccer connection between  Netherlands  and South  Africa : Vera Pauw.

Vera Pauw managed the Netherlands ( OranjeLeewinnen ) between 2004 -2010 and  managed South Africa (  Banyana Banyana ) between 2014-2016. Pauw recently returned to Holland after parting ways with the Houston Dash (September 2018 ) 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vera_Pauw

https://www.houstondynamo.com/post/2018/09/20/houston-dash-coach-vera-pauw-departs-club-return-holland

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3 hours ago, tc-in-bc said:

There's a more relevant women soccer connection between  Netherlands  and South  Africa : Vera Pauw.

Vera Pauw managed the Netherlands ( OranjeLeewinnen ) between 2004 -2010 and  managed South Africa (  Banyana Banyana ) between 2014-2016. Pauw recently returned to Holland after parting ways with the Houston Dash (September 2018 ) 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vera_Pauw

https://www.houstondynamo.com/post/2018/09/20/houston-dash-coach-vera-pauw-departs-club-return-holland

Well-traveled coaches are a dime-a-dozen in the Netherlands. Just look at Guus Hiddink's track-record as an example:

Teams managed
1987–1990 PSV Eindhoven
1990–1991 Fenerbahçe
1991–1994 Valencia
1994–1998 Netherlands
1998–1999 Real Madrid
2000 Real Betis
2001–2002 South Korea
2002–2006 PSV Eindhoven
2005–2006 Australia
2006–2010 Russia
2009 Chelsea (interim)
2010–2011 Turkey
2012–2013 Anzhi Makhachkala
2014–2015 Netherlands
2015–2016 Chelsea (interim)
2018– China U-21

Does such a career mean that connections exist? No doubt at a personal level they exist between Hiddink and the clubs and FAs that he coached. However, when it comes to the KNVB organizing a match say in South Korea, I don't think that Hiddink would have anything to do with that unless he was back on the KNVB payroll.

 

Edited by Robert

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I hope that the CSA isn't putting all their eggs in one basket and waiting for the Algarve Cup to happen? With a number of other international tournaments to choose from, there will definitely not be that many of the top-8 nations in the world competing in Portugal this year?

IMO a good test for Canada would be to play against a European nation that has a similar style to the Dutch. Who's that you might ask?

GERMANY

With a newly-appointed coach and no international matches scheduled until April 6th against Sweden, Martina Voss' team would provide an ideal test for Canada in preparation for the World Cup Final.

https://www.dfb.de/en/news/detail/heading-to-the-right-place-at-the-right-time-197044/?no_cache=1&cHash=a4d58e2c3e0b6524a55a4523c0e145c0

Martina Voss-Tecklenburg earned 125 caps for the DFB-Frauen. ©

Martina Voss-Tecklenburg earned 125 caps for the DFB-Frauen.

 

HEADING TO THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME

Germany women are entering a World Cup year with a new head coach: Martina Voss-Tecklenburg (51) has taken over from former temporary coach Horst Hrubesch and has clear intensions for her time in charge. She wants the DFB-Frauen to play attacking and attractive football as well as win titles.

She sat at the podium in the DFB headquarters with sparkling eyes surrounded by federation president Reinhard Grindel , director Oliver Bierhoff and sporting director Joti Chatzialexiou. Her delight at the job was evident to see. “I’m really looking forward to the task at hand and I’m glad to be finally starting in my new role. It is definitely the right time in my coaching career to be doing this. It is the icing on the cake,” said Martina Voss-Tecklenburg on 30th November when she was officially announced as the new head coach of the DFB-Frauen. “The task is exciting and challenging. I am fully aware of my responsibilities.”

In 2019, the DFB-Frauen national team wants to return to where they believe they belong: “We want to return to the top of world football.” The aims of the new head coach are very clear. Voss-Tecklenburg also will not have to wiat long until her first big practical test as coach. The World Cup begins on 7th June 2019 in France. “I want to win trophies. I never became world champion as a player,” said Voss-Tecklenburg. However, she also admitted that the 2019 World Cup may come a little bit too soon for them to fully achieve that. Within all the euphoria and anticipation, placing too much pressure on yourself can be unproductive. “First of all, I need to get to know the team,” said the Duisburg born coach.

Large successes

A training camp in Andalusia in January will provide the new coach with her first opportunity to get to know the team. Alexandra Popp already knows Martina Voss-Tecklenburg from their days together at FCR 2001 Duisburg. “Martina has played a very important role in my career,” said Popp, who players for current Allianz Frauen Bundesliga champions Wolfsburg. “She helped to form the player that I am and was quite feisty. That shouldn’t have changed.” Popp is correct. Voss-Tecklenburg is one of those coaches who cannot sit down on the coaching bench for more than a few minutes. She lives and breathes football and is fully engaged, as if she wants to get on the pitch to kick the ball towards goal. This was just like when she was a player when she received the nickname as the “weibliche Flankengott aus dem Kohlenpott” (female crossing god from the Ruhr).

During her playing career with Duisburg and TSV Siegen, Martina Voss won four German league titles as well as six DFB-Pokal trophies. She made 124 appearances for the DFB-Frauen including a debut at just 16 years of age in 1984. She was awarded as the first German “female footballer of the year” in 1996 and was a four time European Champion (1989, 1991, 1995 and 1997). The 51 year old retired from football in 2003 and declared at her testimonial that she was “a child of the DFB.” Since then, Voss has concentrated on her coaching career.

Voss returned to Duisburg in 2008 to become FCR 2001’s new head coach after spending time working in an academy. The club changed its name to MSV Duisburg in 2014. Martina Voss, who married businessman Hermann Tecklenburg in 2009 and changed her name to Martina Voss-Tecklenburg, spent three years at her hometown club and went on to win the UEFA Women’s Cup and DFB-Pokal twice. She joined USV Jena in 2011 before becoming head coach of the Swiss national team in 2012. This was an important and correct step in her coaching career. Voss-Tecklenburg went on to promote women’s football in Switzerland, prioritising youth talent and establishing a sustainable structure for the sport in the country. This led to a lot of success. Switerland qualified for the World Cup for the first time in 2015, reaching the last 16 in Canada. At last year’s European Championships in the Netherlands, the Swiss narrowly bowed out in the group stage.

Always our first choice

Back at home, the new DFB-Frauen coach knows that the expectations are higher. “Two numbers are always bigger in Germany compared with Switzerland. It is a success for Switzerland to even qualify for the World Cup, it is always an expectation for Germany will qualify.” The former DFB-Frauen international, who has been a member of the Fortuna Düsseldorf board of directors since February, is expected to bring the DFB-Frauen back to the top of world football where the team has enjoyed success in the past. Interim coach Horst Hrubesch provided the side with the best preparations for Voss-Tecklenburg’s reign as the DFB-Frauen ended their World Cup qualifying campaign with four wins from their last four matches. “The player have once again found their identity and trust,” said a pleased Voss-Tecklenburg. “That is extremelx important. I also don’t have any worries of us not functioning together as a team. We will profit from the foundations already in place. I am very thankful to Horst for what he has achieved.”

Reinhard Grindel that the DFB’s wait to find the ideal candidate will be rewarded. Voss-Tecklenburg’s contract runs until June 2021.”We are fully convinced that she will bring the team back to former successes by bringing new vigour and concepts to the role. We are heading in a new direction. Martina has already delivered success with Switzerland and Duisburg and was always our first choice.

Edited by Robert

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Hmm, Germany and an African nation. Mt. Pete would only have to find one more country and Montreal and Quebec City would be ready to host the inaugural 4-Nations Cup tournament in 2020. 

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In June 2016, Vera Pauw ( then in charge of Banyana Banyana )  was able to use some influence a score an invite from the KNVB to play a friendly in the Netherlands -- which South Africa lost.  So the most recent meeting between these two countries was because of  Vera Pauw.

https://www.knvb.nl/nieuws/oranje/oranjeleeuwinnen/18727/van-de-sanden-en-martens-niet-inzetbaar-tegen-zuid-afrika

Plus , Vera  Pauw still maintains  connections with Banyana Banyana: the  current Banyana Banyana performance analyst Shilene Booysen  was with Pauw with the Houston  Dash. In fact, the women soccer community of South Africa still hold Vera Pauw in high regard.

So it's plausible that Vera  Pauw had a role in arranging the upcoming Netherlands vs SA fixture, but if not then it might have been  arranged by connections that Pauw helped to  broker in the first place.

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3 hours ago, tc-in-bc said:

In June 2016, Vera Pauw ( then in charge of Banyana Banyana )  was able to use some influence a score an invite from the KNVB to play a friendly in the Netherlands -- which South Africa lost.  So the most recent meeting between these two countries was because of  Vera Pauw.

https://www.knvb.nl/nieuws/oranje/oranjeleeuwinnen/18727/van-de-sanden-en-martens-niet-inzetbaar-tegen-zuid-afrika

Plus , Vera  Pauw still maintains  connections with Banyana Banyana: the  current Banyana Banyana performance analyst Shilene Booysen  was with Pauw with the Houston  Dash. In fact, the women soccer community of South Africa still hold Vera Pauw in high regard.

So it's plausible that Vera  Pauw had a role in arranging the upcoming Netherlands vs SA fixture, but if not then it might have been  arranged by connections that Pauw helped to  broker in the first place.

Great revelation. Thank you!

I wonder if Mt. Pete has been able to maintain a similar connection with Carolina Morace?

The fact that the CSA compensation to national team players requires a Sport Canada subsidy to the tune of $1,500 a month, is downright embarrassing. Where else on Earth can you acquire the services of a world-class superstar striker like Christine Sinclair for less than the legal minimum wage? The CSA makes millions every time Christine Sinclair dons the Maple Leaf in Canada, and yet our national association has to be taken to court because Mt. Pete feels justified nickle and diming Canadian women, just because he can!

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As we enter 2019, New Zealand leads the way in Group E, having thus far announced 4 international matches in preparation for France 2019.

GROUP E

NEW ZEALAND:

Feb. 28th - Australia

Mar. 3rd - Argentina

Mar. 6th - South Korea

May 16th - U.S.A.

NETHERLANDS:

Jan. 19th - South Africa

Feb. 26 to Mar. 6th - Algarve Cup - countries and matches to be announced 

CANADA:

Feb. 26 to Mar. 6th - Algarve Cup - countries and matches to be announced 

CAMEROON:

_____________

 http://www.nzfootball.co.nz/newsarticle/71388

Football Ferns to play USA in May  

Rosie White on the ball the last time the Football Ferns played the USA in 2017 (Photosport)

Football Ferns coach Tom Sermanni says his team will receive the ultimate benchmark when they meet the best team in the world in their build-up to the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

The OFC Women’s Nations Cup champions will play the USA, three-time FIFA Women’s World Cup winners and defending champions, in an international friendly on 16 May at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

Sermanni, who coached the USA women’s national team for over a year from early 2013, is looking forward to taking on his old team as the Ferns complete their preparation for the World Cup, which will be staged in nine cities across France during June and July of next year.

“This is a fantastic fixture and a great one leading into the World Cup with it being so close to the tournament,” Sermanni says.

“It will give us a really good benchmark for where we are at and will help us in the final part of our preparation.”

The Football Ferns will meet European champions the Netherlands, World No 5 Canada and Cameroon in Group E of the FIFA Women’s World Cup as they look to pick up their first ever win in the competition. Sermanni believes taking on the tournament favourites on their home soil will be ideal preparation.

“Just the quality of the game in itself will help us first and foremost. The style of game we will face will be similar to Canada and similar to the Netherlands. There will also be a physicality to the American game that will hopefully help us against Cameroon,” he says.

“The USA are going to be a huge test for us, they are the best team in the world. They have some outstanding players and they will be ready to go at that stage, most of them will be playing in their league competitions so it will be a formidable test.”

The USA and New Zealand have met 16 times in their history, with the World No 1 having won 14, drawn one and lost just once to the Ferns.

New Zealand played the USA in two international friendlies in 2017, the Tony Readings-coached team going down 3-1 and 5-0. The previous meeting before those encounters was the opening game of the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, when the USA defeated the Football Ferns 2-0 in Belo Horizonte.

New Zealand were also the USA’s opponent at Busch Stadium during the build-up to the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, the home team winning 4-0 in front of more than 35,000 fans.

The upcoming clash will mark 32 years since New Zealand’s only victory over the USA which came in the first match between the teams back in 1987, a 1-0 victory for the Football Ferns.

Match Details

USA vs Football Ferns
International Friendly
Thursday 16 May, 7pm CT (Friday 17 May, 12pm NZT)  
Busch Stadium, St. Louis

2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Football Ferns games (NZT)

vs Netherlands
12 June, 1am

vs Canada
16 June, 7am

vs Cameroon
21 June, 4am

Article added: Wednesday 12 December 2018

Edited by Robert

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14 hours ago, Robert said:

As we enter 2019, New Zealand leads the way in Group E, having thus far announced 4 international matches in preparation for France 2019.

GROUP E

NEW ZEALAND:

Feb. 28th - Australia

Mar. 3rd - Argentina

Mar. 6th - South Korea

May 16th - U.S.A.

NETHERLANDS:

Jan. 19th - South Africa

Feb. 26 to Mar. 6th - Algarve Cup - countries and matches to be announced 

CANADA:

Feb. 26 to Mar. 6th - Algarve Cup - countries and matches to be announced 

CAMEROON:

_____________

Possible CANADA - the NETHERLANDS preview @ Algarve?

https://www.vrouwenvoetbalnieuws.nl/nieuws/hoofdnieuws/203124/oranjeleeuwinnen-naar-zuid-afrika-en-portugal-in-voorbereiding

OranjeLeeuwinnen naar Zuid-Afrika en Portugal in voorbereiding

 08 december 2018 | 19:29 door Amber van Lieshout( 0 reacties)
 

OranjeLeeuwinnen naar Zuid-Afrika en Portugal in voorbereiding

De OranjeLeeuwinnen kennen hun tegenstanders voor de groepsfase van het WK. In voorbereiding op het toernooi zal de ploeg van bondscoach Sarina Wiegman afreizen naar Zuid-Afrika en Portugal.

In januari wordt de voorbereiding gestart met een trainingskamp in Zuid-Afrika. Daar wordt een oefeninterland gespeeld tegen Zuid-Afrika. Het duel wordt op 19 januari 2019 gespeeld in het Cape Town Stadium in Kaapstad. Aftrap van de wedstrijd is om 15.00 uur lokale tijd (14.00 uur Nederlandse tijd).

Van 26 februari tot en met 6 maart nemen de Leeuwinnen deel aan de Algarve Cup in de Portugal. Het is voor de derde keer op rij dat de ploeg meedoet aan het toernooi.

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On 12/28/2018 at 4:07 PM, Robert said:

No matter how you cut it, CSA coaches and National Team Players have had multiple issues with Mt. Pete, and obviously I'm not alone when I say that Canadian soccer would be much better off without Mt. Pete at the helm of the CSA!

I see a CSA coach in the singular in those posts and it was Morace who as opposed to a slight on someone's reputation is more a badge of honour. And the players have had a long-standing compensation issue with the CSA for decades, not Peter Montopoli. As the General Secretary he is the face and convenient tip of the iceberg.

I don't see reference to anything supporting his dereliction of duty in those posts and still wonder why the personal attack on his character. Did he slight you personally in some way somewhere?

On 12/28/2018 at 4:07 PM, Robert said:

The fact that the CSA compensation to national team players requires a Sport Canada subsidy to the tune of $1,500 a month, is downright embarrassing. Where else on Earth can you acquire the services of a world-class superstar striker like Christine Sinclair for less than the legal minimum wage?

Don't think you realize that a large part of the players NWSL salaries are paid by the CSA. Above and beyond which the NWSL has a salary cap but in Europe there are players making well over six figures and have been since Marta and Lotta Schelin a long time ago. Any players are welcome to play there, and we have a few. There are any number of reasons why players don't though go including language, culture, partners in the cities they play in, etc.

And in the case of someone like Christine Sinclair, how much has the association and player registration fees paid for her development over the past 20 years? That would be many, many millions of dollars. And how much has she earned in endorsements? Same. I think the bottom line is the Christine Sinclair/CSA relationship has been a very good one for both parties.

On 12/28/2018 at 4:07 PM, Robert said:

As we enter 2019, New Zealand leads the way in Group E, having thus far announced 4 international matches in preparation for France 2019.

I don't think announcing early is a performance indicator, or even that playing more friendlies has anything to do with your result. As you referenced 2011 a few times we played 16 in six months that year and came in dead last. It's not quantity of games, or announcing them early, or even the quality. It's having the right plan and vision, the right soul of the team , the right players technically, mentally and spiritually, and the luck of the Irish.

Edited by Vic

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3 hours ago, Vic said:

I don't think announcing early is a performance indicator, or even that playing more friendlies has anything to do with your result. As you referenced 2011 a few times we played 16 in six months that year and came in dead last. It's not quantity of games, or announcing them early, or even the quality. It's having the right plan and vision, the right soul of the team , the right players technically, mentally and spiritually, and the luck of the Irish.

Come on, Vic. You don't really expect people here to take all that seriously, do you? If what you say is true, then I guess the U.S.S.F. must have it all wrong:

1) Jan. 19th - France (Le Havre)

2) Jan. 22nd - Spain (Alicante)

3) Feb. 27th - Japan (Chester)

4) Mar. 2nd - England (Nashville)

5) Mar. 5th - Brazil (Tampa)

6) Apr. 4th - Australia (Commerce City)

7) Apr. 7th - Belgium (Los Angeles)

8) May 12th - South Africa (Santa Clara)

9) May 16th - New Zealand (St. Louis)

10) May 26th - Mexico (Harrison)

Maybe someone should call the U.S.S.F. and give them Mt. Pete's phone number.

 

Edited by Robert

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You think the USSF is a role model?  Strange, I can't remember how many games the men played in their Russian prep.

Seeing as we don't have a 1/10th of the money and staff as the Americans, guess that means we'll never be able to prepare or compete with them and should just pull the plug.

Either that or... 

I don't think announcing early is a performance indicator, or even that playing more friendlies has anything to do with your result. As you referenced 2011 a few times we played 16 in six months that year and came in dead last. It's not quantity of games, or announcing them early, or even the quality. It's having the right plan and vision, the right soul of the team , the right players technically, mentally and spiritually, and the luck of the Irish.

2016 U.S. WNT Olympic prep:
Jan 23 San Diego 5-0 Ireland
Feb 10 Frisco 5-0 Costa Rica
Feb 13 Frisco 1-0 Mexico
Feb 15 Frisco 10-0 Puerto Rico
Feb 19 Houston 5-0 T&T
Feb 21 Houston 2-0 Canada
Mar 03 Tampa Bay 1-0 England
Mar 06 Nashville 1-0 France
Mar 09 Boca Raton 2-1 Germany
Apr 06 Hartford 7-0 Colombia
Apr 10 Philadelphia 3-0 Colombia
Jun 02 Colorado 3-3 Japan
Jun 05 Cleveland 2-0 Japan
Jul 09 Chicago 1-0 South Africa
Jul 22 Kansas City 4-0 Costa Rica

15 games all at home and without a single loss. They beat the Colombians twice by 10 goals and then tied them in the Olympics. Friendlies don't mean jack. They tripped again on the Swedes and bombed out early. We medalled again!

 

Edited by Vic

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33 minutes ago, Vic said:

You think the USSF is a role model?  Strange, I can't remember how many games the men played in their Russian prep.

Seeing as we don't have a 1/10th of the money and staff as the Americans, guess that means we'll never be able to prepare or compete with them and should just pull the plug.

Either that or... 

I don't think announcing early is a performance indicator, or even that playing more friendlies has anything to do with your result. As you referenced 2011 a few times we played 16 in six months that year and came in dead last. It's not quantity of games, or announcing them early, or even the quality. It's having the right plan and vision, the right soul of the team , the right players technically, mentally and spiritually, and the luck of the Irish.

As we are on the "Women's National Teams, Leagues & Clubs" forum, let's try to limit our discussion to women's game?

As far as determining whether or not the U.S.S.F. model of preparing for a World Cup Final is successful, decide for yourself. It's certainly hard to argue with the American track-record at World Cup Finals. I can't think of a better one.

1991 - Champions

1995 - Third-place

1999 - Champions

2003 - Third-place

2007 - Third-place

2011 - Runners-up

2015 - Champions

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