Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Robert

CPL - WORLD CUP 2026

Recommended Posts

How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold before Canada co-hosts the 2026 World Cup Final?

USA-Canada-Mexico 2026 World Cup Bid Logo (local).png CPL_Logo.png

Edited by Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Robert said:

How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold before Canada co-hosts the 2026 World Cup Final?

USA-Canada-Mexico 2026 World Cup Bid Logo (local).png CPL_Logo.png

Or does it matter?

Edited by Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Robert said:

How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold before Canada co-hosts the 2026 World Cup Final?

USA-Canada-Mexico 2026 World Cup Bid Logo (local).png CPL_Logo.png

Should the Canadian Soccer Association think it matters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Robert said:

How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold before Canada co-hosts the 2026 World Cup Final?

USA-Canada-Mexico 2026 World Cup Bid Logo (local).png CPL_Logo.png

If it does matter to the CSA (could you imagine co-hosting a World Cup Final when you've shown that your country is incapable of sustaining a domestic league?) it might be worth considering a similar project to what our southern neighbours implemented when Project-40 was launched. Why not form a team with National U20 players to create an 8th CPL team. Wouldn't that benefit both the CPL and the CSA?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Ansem said:

@socceronly For your action 

It isn't a bad question. 

I remember Project 40.  I don't think we should do that, and I don't think the CPL would want it.  It would be lose lose to make a team that way. If it does well, the league looks bad. If it does badly the program looks bad... 

It doesnt' mean you couldn't have a project 40 distributed across all of CPL.   A kind of quid pro quo to get kids into pro teams and minutes who may be fringe and the CPL teams are not willing to risk.   So it isn't your top prospects, but your fringe ones to boost the numbers and increase the opportunities with little risk to the CPL financially.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Robert said:

How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold before Canada co-hosts the 2026 World Cup Final?

I think you are asking the wrong question.

It should be, "How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold?"

And my answer to that would be: Extremely

This is a once-in-a-lifetime shot IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ted said:

I think you are asking the wrong question.

It should be, "How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold?"

And my answer to that would be: Extremely

This is a once-in-a-lifetime shot IMO.

Pretty much sums it up. Not sure how much more discussion can come out of this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, socceronly said:

It isn't a bad question. 

I remember Project 40.  I don't think we should do that, and I don't think the CPL would want it.  It would be lose lose to make a team that way. If it does well, the league looks bad. If it does badly the program looks bad... 

It doesnt' mean you couldn't have a project 40 distributed across all of CPL.   A kind of quid pro quo to get kids into pro teams and minutes who may be fringe and the CPL teams are not willing to risk.   So it isn't your top prospects, but your fringe ones to boost the numbers and increase the opportunities with little risk to the CPL financially.

 

 

 

I don't think that Project 40, when it was launched, made either the A-League, or the United States national program look bad.

In the case of the CPL, the league would have a balanced schedule with the addition of an 8th team, plus each of the current 7 clubs would end up with two additional homes games, as a Project 40-like team only plays road games. The two extra homes would mean additional revenue for the seven current clubs, while they would not having to incur any traveling expenses to earn that revenue. If the extra revenue were to be applied to paying the traveling expenses for the Project 40-like team, then it would cost the CSA next to nothing to get actively involved with the CPL, while at the same time giving its "fringe" players extra minutes of playing time on Canadian fields, while raising the profile of these "fringe" players in 7 domestic markets, while also getting a first hand opportunity to check out the talent competing in the CPL. So instead of a "lose, lose" scenario, I say you end-up with a "win, win, win, win, win, win, win, win" scenario. PLUSSSS, check out the link below to see all of the talent that Project 40/Generation Adidas has produced over the years.

 

Project-40 in the A-League

Year Division League Reg. Season Playoffs Open Cup
1998 2 USISL A-League 5th, Pacific Did not qualify Did not qualify
1999 2 USL A-League 2nd, Central Quarterfinals Did not qualify
2000 2 USL A-League 4th, Central Did not qualify 3rd Round

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Adidas#1997

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, BringBackTheBlizzard said:

Whatever happens in 2026 I hope there is another song like this one:

 

Thanks for sharing these great moments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now, I only hope that each of the 7 CPL clubs will be able to attract larger crowds for their home openers, than the number of Canadians who were interested in the story of a Vancouver Island First Nations player around the turn of the 19th century, as shown on the number of views in the following feature:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Robert said:

Right now, I only hope that each of the 7 CPL clubs will be able to attract larger crowds for their home openers, than the number of Canadians who were interested in the story of a Vancouver Island First Nations player around the turn of the 19th century, as shown on the number of views in the following feature:

 

My interest in players is based on their ability, not their ethnic background. I could not care less if they are First Nations, Last Nations, or any Nations Inbetween.

Edited by dsqpr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, dsqpr said:

My interest in players is based on their ability, not their ethnic background. I could not care less if they are First Nations, Last Nations, or any Nations Inbetween.

Did you miss the point? Do you care about the "CANADA Nation?" I willing to go out on a limb here and say that everyone on this board cares about the "CANADA Nation." We all want to belong and participate in that larger international community, known as the World Cup. First Nations, like all other Nations, just want to belong and participate. Unfortunately, history has shown that it was not always possible for First Nations to belong and participate. Hopefully, the Canada Hall of Fame induction of Harry Manson will help to change that.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, dsqpr said:

My interest in players is based on their ability, not their ethnic background. I could not care less if they are First Nations, Last Nations, or any Nations Inbetween.

Really? Alphonso Davies' story is fantastic and interesting because of his ethnic background and how he came to play. I like hearing about players histories and especially stories of how they overcame disadvantages or "whatever happened to" etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Robert said:

Did you miss the point? Do you care about the "CANADA Nation?" I willing to go out on a limb here and say that everyone on this board cares about the "CANADA Nation." We all want to belong and participate in that larger international community, known as the World Cup. First Nations, like all other Nations, just want to belong and participate. Unfortunately, history has shown that it was not always possible for First Nations to belong and participate. Hopefully, the Canada Hall of Fame induction of Harry Manson will help to change that.

 

 

Do you not understand the difference between "ethnicity" and "nationality"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, ted said:

Really? Alphonso Davies' story is fantastic and interesting because of his ethnic background and how he came to play. I like hearing about players histories and especially stories of how they overcame disadvantages or "whatever happened to" etc.

I agree with all of that Ted except for the "ethnic background" part. It doesn't matter to me whether a player is black or white or whatever. But of course I take a much bigger interest if he/she is Canadian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/8/2018 at 5:15 PM, ted said:

I think you are asking the wrong question.

It should be, "How crucial is it to Canadian soccer that the CPL does not fold?"

And my answer to that would be: Extremely

This is a once-in-a-lifetime shot IMO.

I was thinking it's not once in a lifetime, but it probably is over for the next 30 years if this fails. But then I thought about the stranglehold USL and MLS have on soccer north of Mexico and in 30 years, there is no way Canada will be able to create a league to compete once they've been that entrenched. So yes, success is crucial.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Initial B said:

I was thinking it's not once in a lifetime, but it probably is over for the next 30 years if this fails. But then I thought about the stranglehold USL and MLS have on soccer north of Mexico and in 30 years, there is no way Canada will be able to create a league to compete once they've been that entrenched. So yes, success is crucial.

I agree.  If you give the USL and MLS another 30 years before making another attempt, trying to create a league at that point will be like trying to shave back Mt. Everest with a nail file.  It does not have to be a overnight success, but it needs to stick and catch on a little more each year.  If this league is not still running come 2026, then the national team will fall right back into the dark ages all over again.  Success is crucial, but we need to be realistic and patient with the gains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Blindside16 said:

I agree.  If you give the USL and MLS another 30 years before making another attempt, trying to create a league at that point will be like trying to shave back Mt. Everest with a nail file.  It does not have to be a overnight success, but it needs to stick and catch on a little more each year.  If this league is not still running come 2026, then the national team will fall right back into the dark ages all over again.  Success is crucial, but we need to be realistic and patient with the gains.

The distance from the dark ages to a golden age is not that long. All it takes is one generation of special talent and the right man to lead them! Take, for instance, the Dutch example from above. Up until 1966, the Netherlands were among the soccer minnows of Europe. Then along came Johan Cruijff, Wim van Hanegem, et al. At the same time emerges the General, the Sphinx, Rinus Michels, the inventor of Total Football, who guides his his young stalwarts to 3  successive Dutch titles to launch a Golden Age that's still going more than 60 years later. The thing we all know is that the Dutch had a domestic league to play in. Without the Eredivisie none of the Dutch success would have been possible!

Will the CPL succeed or fold? Crucial? HHHAAAA! It's fucking CRITICAL! It's a matter of LIFE or DEATH for Canadian soccer.

Edited by Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Robert said:

The distance from the dark ages to a golden age is not that long. All it takes is one generation of special talent and the right man to lead them! Take, for instance, the Dutch example from above. Up until 1966, the Netherlands were among the soccer minnows of Europe. Then along came Johan Cruijff, Wim van Hanegem, et al. At the same time emerges the General, the Sphinx, Rinus Michels, the inventor of Total Football, who guides his his young stalwarts to 3  successive Dutch titles to launch a Golden Age that's still going more than 60 years later. The thing we all know is that the Dutch had a domestic league to play in. Without the Eredivisie none of the Dutch success would have been possible!

Will the CPL succeed or fold? Crucial? HHHAAAA! It's fucking CRITICAL! It's a matter of LIFE or DEATH for Canadian soccer.

I do not disagree with you.  If the CPL folds, Canadian Soccer will remain in no mans land for another generation.  Will it be the death blow to Canadian Soccer?  Perhaps, although I think the more likely screnario is that it will just fall back into mediocrity.  We cannot afford to wait any longer.  This league needs to succeed for the growth and success of Canadian Soccer.  Having this domestic league with inspire the youth within the sport.  They will want to be the next Larin, Davies, Tabla, etc.. and in order to truly push that growth we MUST have a domestic league.

 

The only point I was trying to make was people need to be realistic at what is a success/failure.  For me attendance wise  from the memberships we have seen sold, I think a success for York, Pacific, Calgary and Edmonton would be an average attendance in the 5,000 - 7,500 and for Halifax, Winnipeg and Hamilton in and around the 10,000 mark.  Anything over that would be bonus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Blindside16 said:

I do not disagree with you.  If the CPL folds, Canadian Soccer will remain in no mans land for another generation.  Will it be the death blow to Canadian Soccer?  Perhaps, although I think the more likely screnario is that it will just fall back into mediocrity.  We cannot afford to wait any longer.  This league needs to succeed for the growth and success of Canadian Soccer.  Having this domestic league with inspire the youth within the sport.  They will want to be the next Larin, Davies, Tabla, etc.. and in order to truly push that growth we MUST have a domestic league.

 

The only point I was trying to make was people need to be realistic at what is a success/failure.  For me attendance wise  from the memberships we have seen sold, I think a success for York, Pacific, Calgary and Edmonton would be an average attendance in the 5,000 - 7,500 and for Halifax, Winnipeg and Hamilton in and around the 10,000 mark.  Anything over that would be bonus.

Ultimately, the attendance that the CPL manages to attract will prove to be the deciding factor in determining success and failure. The equation for that is very simple:

The CPL still operating in 2026 = Success

The CPL folding before 2026 = Failure

At this point, we can only speculate what those attendance numbers will be. What we do know is the what the public perception is of individual sports. In general, people tend to agree that Canada is the best country in the world when it comes to hockey, much the same as Brazil being seen as the best when it comes to soccer, and China in ping-pong, etc, etc. Conversely, there is also a general perception about Canada when it comes to soccer. Dispelling that unflattering perception is the greatest challenge facing the CPL. Sure, the Voyageurs and the families and friends of those playing for CPL clubs will be buying tickets, but obviously that's not going to be anywhere near enough to sustain this league. So the key question at this point is: What are the CPL and its 7 clubs doing to convert those whose perceptions need to be changed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×