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"Between July 2017 and June 2018, they looked at nine national papers one day a month and took note of what photographs were used. In total they found 3,107 pictures of people doing sport. Of those, five were of men and women together, 3,011 were of men – and just 91 were of women: 2.9% of the total.

On the worst day of their survey, during September 2017, there were 365 pictures of men doing sport and one solitary photograph of a woman.

And even when sportswomen were pictured, photographs often showed them in a dress picking up an award, or draped in a flag – not actually doing the thing they were famous for."

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2018/nov/03/women-sports-pages-girls-play-losing-battle

It's a vicious circle, how can women dream of becoming athletes if they never see them and hear their stories?

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On 11/3/2018 at 11:23 AM, Vic said:

"Between July 2017 and June 2018, they looked at nine national papers one day a month and took note of what photographs were used. In total they found 3,107 pictures of people doing sport. Of those, five were of men and women together, 3,011 were of men – and just 91 were of women: 2.9% of the total.

On the worst day of their survey, during September 2017, there were 365 pictures of men doing sport and one solitary photograph of a woman.

And even when sportswomen were pictured, photographs often showed them in a dress picking up an award, or draped in a flag – not actually doing the thing they were famous for."

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2018/nov/03/women-sports-pages-girls-play-losing-battle

It's a vicious circle, how can women dream of becoming athletes if they never see them and hear their stories?

I will say that the Globe and Mail, at least recently on Saturdays in the photo spread section of the sports, usually has a good representation of female athletes. There is hardly ever any reporting of female leagues though, only national teams doing well on the international stage.

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Interesting tidbits about Hegerberg's upbringing from NYT:

Hegerberg’s parents instituted various rules — though they were meant to embolden their children, not constrict them.

For example, they never drove their children to soccer practice. “They had to go to training by running or by bike,” Stein Erik Hegerberg said. “If it’s not important for you, then you won’t go.”

The Hegerberg children were encouraged to make their own choices, and to learn from their own mistakes. And, above all, they were told to always, always remain humble.

“You can always criticize upward,” Stein Erik Hegerberg said, “but never kick downward.”

Those values, at the same time, will keep her away from the biggest platform of all: the Women’s World Cup next summer in France. Last year, Hegerberg quit the Norwegian team after determining the organization was not — in her view — doing enough to support the women’s program.

Hegerberg’s decision to quit the national team kept her up for many sleepless nights, she said. But after she made the announcement, she said she felt a huge weight lifted from her shoulders. The new peace of mind, she mused, has played a role in her ascent as a player.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/11/sports/ada-hegerberg-lyon-ballon-dor-twerk.html?emc=edit_th_181212&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=770267681212

 

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On 12/12/2018 at 12:31 PM, red card said:

Interesting tidbits about Hegerberg's upbringing from NYT:

Hegerberg’s parents instituted various rules — though they were meant to embolden their children, not constrict them.

For example, they never drove their children to soccer practice. “They had to go to training by running or by bike,” Stein Erik Hegerberg said. “If it’s not important for you, then you won’t go.”

The Hegerberg children were encouraged to make their own choices, and to learn from their own mistakes. And, above all, they were told to always, always remain humble.

Both her parents played professionally and it was an intense soccer upbringing. The more interesting observation is that she and older sister Andrine (PSG women) played with boys until they were teenagers.

Her national team walkout was driven by the country coming in last in the Euro last year with no goals scored (i.e. the best player in the world did not score in the entire tournament). She trains in Lyon with the best players in the world in an extremely well-run program and is more of a northern Norwegian in her directness and holds no quarter when things are not to the highest standard. Especially in a country with that kind of resources (no national debt and if you divided up the surplus everyone is a millionaire).

Great players hate to lose and more than anything hate to be shamed. We had something similar in 1999 after being embarrassed by the Russians and Americans. That was a pivotal moment that completely turned our program around from amateur to world class.

Norway were way ahead of us in developing the women's game and were the original powerhouse in the first two World Cup finals against the Americans and Germans (countries 20-100 times their size). They had great vision and were way ahead of the curve. They were in medal games in four of the first five World Cups but other countries have caught up and they haven't been in one since 2007. They floundered for a decade and then finally the complete bomb-out last year.

Hopefully it's all just evolutionary and an advanced women's football society going full circle and finding it's way back to the beginning, difficult as that may be though because of the height of that beginning.

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