Jump to content

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, -Hammer- said:

Yes and no, but mostly yes. I mean I understand why teams often do this. Lowering ticket prices doesn't automatically put people in the seats. A lower price point needs to be advertised the same as any other event. Too many teams say "Well this is how many I'm getting, so I may as well maximize profits on who is there. The diehards will carry the weight" That I get.

The problem is it is far more important to have people at the game, to create the good atmosphere, to make your teams optics look good, create positive news by saying you are sold out, money off of merchandise and concessions, make it affordable to bring your kids to the game, then it is to maximize profits (unless you are in a tight squeeze as a franchise). It's what has killed hockey teams at Copps for ages because people don't feel they should be paying higher prices in stadiums that are half filled.

The issue, is that you can't just market "Now with lower ticket prices" because it's just not that impressive a marketing point and can kinda make people who paid full price feel cheated. It's a marketing point you need to bundle with other marketing events or at the start of a season.

It's that typical gutless Canadian corporate mentality that is so evident with these CFL owners. Like a bell or Rogers who hide behind protectionism, opting to charge exuberant prices on the Homefront instead of competing to become innovative multi-nationals, the CFL ownership groups appear to be operating in the same mold. Granted, while the multinational thing is a little much considering it would be difficult for the league to achieve a global audience, the CFL teams could still try to establish themselves as extreme value brands that are unanimously loved by most if not all Canadians.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Joe MacCarthy said:

I doubt too many pro franchises can give what you want for 40 bucks, especially with only 9 games to make money; maybe baseball with 61 home games.

And that is precisely why I have chosen not to go to CFL games outside of these deals. And it is a big factor in why many others are no longer choosing to go as well.

Attending professional sports is quickly becoming an activity for the rich. This is why I don't go to Flames games unless I get a free ticket. It's why I don't go to Roughnecks games unless I get $20 seats. It's why I don't go to Stampeders games for the aforementioned reason. It will be the same scenario if a professional soccer club comes to town. $65 / ticket for okay seats? Fuck off. $25-30 / ticket? That's more like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, shermanator said:

CFL ticket prices in Calgary have shot up as well. A few years ago I looked into getting season tickets between the goal line and 15 yard line. Seasons for 6 rows up were just over $300. Those same season tickets are now $517.

For me, the value just isn't there as it used to be. The only way I will be attending is if I get a package that includes a ticket / bus ride / pint / burger for $40.

Even less IMO lol. I think tickets shouldn't cost any more than going to the movies. 

I understand the difficulties CFL teams face with doing this considering there are so few home games and the lack of a huge lucrative TV deal.

Edited by Macksam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Argos @10 yard line row 8 were $380 each seat this season. I spilt a pair with my colleague and we alternate games, its pretty reasonable. Why is Calgary so expensive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Pqhbv said:

Argos @10 yard line row 8 were $380 each seat this season. I spilt a pair with my colleague and we alternate games, its pretty reasonable. Why is Calgary so expensive?

Simple, the Flames are trying to milk as much money out of the fan base that was there when they bought the club. They have done the same with the Roughnecks as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Macksam said:

It's that typical gutless Canadian corporate mentality that is so evident with these CFL owners. Like a bell or Rogers who hide behind protectionism, opting to charge exuberant prices on the Homefront instead of competing to become innovative multi-nationals, the CFL ownership groups appear to be operating in the same mold. Granted, while the multinational thing is a little much considering it would be difficult for the league to achieve a global audience, the CFL teams could still try to establish themselves as extreme value brands that are unanimously loved by most if not all Canadians.

To be fair, not all the CFL owners subscribe to this model. Realistically only BC and Calgary where this is abundantly apparent, because there hasn't been any improvement to the experience to justify the increased cost. Hamilton, you can say new stadium with better seating, better video screen, patios etc, as with Winnipeg and Saskatchewan to justify the price increases, and for the most part it's fair. Ottawa you really can't complain, as they have yet to increase prices. Edmonton from my understanding gave Commonwealth some substantial renos. Toronto has kept prices pretty comparable from BMO to the Dome (although I still say they should have also lowered the price points as BMO is likely a cheaper facility for them) and I'm not aware of any issues in Montreal (apart from the team is sucking huge amounts of wind).

Lets also be honest, this isn't unique to the CFL by any stretch. All the Toronto sports franchises are infamous for price gouging, espcially the Leafs. The NFL has done it to their smaller markets for years and many Jr. Hockey franchises do it too, Missisauga coming first to mind.

 

2 hours ago, Macksam said:

Even less IMO lol. I think tickets shouldn't cost any more than going to the movies. 

I understand the difficulties CFL teams face with doing this considering there are so few home games and the lack of a huge lucrative TV deal.

Depends on your definition of lucrative. It's obviously not comparable to most big US sports deals, but in terms of just the Canadian broadcast rights, only the NHL certainly superior and argueably the entireity of the MLB, if those rights also included the Jays (which as we all know, are perpetually tied to Rogers so we can only make educated guesses on how much it would be worth) and all the games (of which there are an absurd amount). Even the mighty NFL's rights don't appear to be as lucrative in Canada. Additionally, the US broadcast rights for the CFL while still paltry, are apparently consistently improving. No longer are CBC's poorer broadcast standards and aged stadiums a barrier for selling the league down south.

One huge advantage that the CFL player salaries are very low in comparisson to other leauges. The other huge advantage the CFL has too is that only having 9 teams means each team gets a very large slice of pie. It's pretty much accepted that the CFL Canadian TV deal nets every team between 4 to 4.5 million, which pretty much covers nearly the entire 5 million dollar salary cap. So after you add the US TV deal (which is likely low to mid six figures), your biggest expense as a team is just over 4/5s covered. The Gate, Concessions and Merchandise is where your profits lie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, -Hammer- said:

No longer are CBC's poorer broadcast standards and aged stadiums a barrier for selling the league down south.

Agreed with everything you said, except for the above.  I want to put to bed that persistent myth about the CBC having poor broadcasts, absolutely untrue.  I was in the business then and I remember.  Where people seem to differentiate is that when TSN came on board, they really sold the brand.  Just because CBC didn't do that doesn't reflect on the quality of their broadcasts.

CBC was renowned for the quality of their sports broadcasts, so much so that when ABC's Roone Arledge/Don Ohlmeyer came to do the 76 Olympics in Montreal, instead of doing their own setups which they almost always did, they often used just one ISO camera to follow the American in the event and mostly used CBC's international feed.  Ohlmeyer himself stated this.

Also I don't think the stadiums were any barrier, as proven by the NFL strike of 82 and the Canadian coverage.  Yes there was that story of US TV and Ivor Wynne in the late 60s early 70s that led to its refurb but that wasn't ever much of a factor later.

In fact the following comes from the strike of 82, Commonwealth Stadium

Merlin Olsen: "Dick (Enberg) I gotta tell ya, I've never seen a more beautiful stadium or more beautiful playing surface, anywhere."

Edited by Joe MacCarthy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Joe MacCarthy said:

Agreed with everything you said, except for the above.  I want to put to bed that persistent myth about the CBC having poor broadcasts, absolutely untrue.  I was in the business then and I remember.  Where people seem to differentiate is that when TSN came on board, they really sold the brand.  Just because CBC didn't do that doesn't reflect on the quality of their broadcasts.

CBC was renowned for the quality of their sports broadcasts, so much so that when ABC's Roone Arledge/Don Ohlmeyer came to do the 76 Olympics in Montreal, instead of doing their own setups which they almost always did, they often used just one ISO camera to follow the American in the event and mostly used CBC's international feed.  Ohlmeyer himself stated this.

Also I don't think the stadiums were any barrier, as proven by the NFL strike of 82 and the Canadian coverage.  Yes there was that story of US TV and Ivor Wynne in the late 60s early 70s that led to its refurb but that wasn't ever much of a factor later.

In fact the following comes from the strike of 82, Commonwealth Stadium

Merlin Olsen: "Dick (Enberg) I gotta tell ya, I've never seen a more beautiful stadium or more beautiful playing surface, anywhere."

5 minutes ago, Joe MacCarthy said:

Agreed with everything you said, except for the above.  I want to put to bed that persistent myth about the CBC having poor broadcasts, absolutely untrue.  I was in the business then and I remember.  Where people seem to differentiate is that when TSN came on board, they really sold the brand.  Just because CBC didn't do that doesn't reflect on the quality of their broadcasts.

CBC was renowned for the quality of their sports broadcasts, so much so that when ABC's Roone Arledge/Don Ohlmeyer came to do the 76 Olympics in Montreal, instead of doing their own setups which they almost always did, they often used just one ISO camera to follow the American in the event and mostly used CBC's international feed.  Ohlmeyer himself stated this.

Also I don't think the stadiums were any barrier, as proven by the NFL strike of 82 and the Canadian coverage.  Yes there was that story of US TV and Ivor Wynne in the late 60s early 70s that led to its refurb but that wasn't ever much of a factor later.

In fact the following comes from the strike of 82, Commonwealth Stadium

Merlin Olsen: "Dick (Enberg) I gotta tell ya, I've never seen a more beautiful stadium or more beautiful playing surface, anywhere."

Well, I disagree...and I suspect we won't find common ground here. Reporting games and intros like new anchors vs commentators, starting games with the annouce crew making for a short, unexpansive pre-game, awful and needless graphics with gimicky intros, terrible orange jackets in an attempt to duplicate HNIC's Light Blues, went through theme songs almost yearly, bizzare color overlays, lackluster score graphics, cutting to literal newspaper headlines instead of actual players involved in issues to name a few offenses and in my opinion is just seems like there was a limited emotional investment by the commentators because of the conga line of them going in and out.

Then go to TSN, they've kept the same theme, at least since 97 adding consistency to the broadcast, they have a panel of the same, consistent game veterans before the game and dicuss the game and provide halftime commentary making for a much more informed broadcast, they utilize more experienced broadcasters and keep pairings so you have consistent voices for the program. They keept the graphics to a general minimum, and those graphics that are present showcase the game and players, less the logo or the latest pretty graphic we can make, commentators wear regular suits (which CBC did clue in on around the 80s) and actual excitment in the broadcast. That at pioneering keeping the score on the screen at all times.

Feel free to disagree, but if you go back and watch old CBC broadcast, you notice after then 60s, the format seems different with the times. You go back and watch a TSN broadcast, and while you can certainly see the programing is still developing, the core concepts and people in the broadcast are the same. IE: You have a mostly similar panel, just in a different studio. You don't overly cheese up the graphics which look awful today, you have a pre-game followed by one color guy and one broadcast guy. It is a formula.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, -Hammer- said:

To be fair, not all the CFL owners subscribe to this model. Realistically only BC and Calgary where this is abundantly apparent, because there hasn't been any improvement to the experience to justify the increased cost. Hamilton, you can say new stadium with better seating, better video screen, patios etc, as with Winnipeg and Saskatchewan to justify the price increases, and for the most part it's fair. Ottawa you really can't complain, as they have yet to increase prices. Edmonton from my understanding gave Commonwealth some substantial renos. Toronto has kept prices pretty comparable from BMO to the Dome (although I still say they should have also lowered the price points as BMO is likely a cheaper facility for them) and I'm not aware of any issues in Montreal (apart from the team is sucking huge amounts of wind).

Lets also be honest, this isn't unique to the CFL by any stretch. All the Toronto sports franchises are infamous for price gouging, espcially the Leafs. The NFL has done it to their smaller markets for years and many Jr. Hockey franchises do it too, Missisauga coming first to mind.

 

Depends on your definition of lucrative. It's obviously not comparable to most big US sports deals, but in terms of just the Canadian broadcast rights, only the NHL certainly superior and argueably the entireity of the MLB, if those rights also included the Jays (which as we all know, are perpetually tied to Rogers so we can only make educated guesses on how much it would be worth) and all the games (of which there are an absurd amount). Even the mighty NFL's rights don't appear to be as lucrative in Canada. Additionally, the US broadcast rights for the CFL while still paltry, are apparently consistently improving. No longer are CBC's poorer broadcast standards and aged stadiums a barrier for selling the league down south.

One huge advantage that the CFL player salaries are very low in comparisson to other leauges. The other huge advantage the CFL has too is that only having 9 teams means each team gets a very large slice of pie. It's pretty much accepted that the CFL Canadian TV deal nets every team between 4 to 4.5 million, which pretty much covers nearly the entire 5 million dollar salary cap. So after you add the US TV deal (which is likely low to mid six figures), your biggest expense as a team is just over 4/5s covered. The Gate, Concessions and Merchandise is where your profits lie.

A lucrative Canadian TV sports contract should be in the $200 to 430 million (NHL) per annum range. The Jays I would estimate at about $200 million if you could monetize what their TV deal would theoretically be. The CFL's 40 million, while decent, isn't earth shattering, and if it really comes in at number 3, it just tells me there's a lot of opportunity for other sports entities to take hold of the Canadian psyche. 

The low salaries of the CFL is an effect, not a cause. If the revenues were higher, the salaries would be higher.

I never understood increasing the prices after moving into a new venue. Isn't the fact they are moving into a new arena suppose to help with revenues in general. I can understand if it's temporarily done to help pay for the new facility but a lot of these stadiums were paid for with public money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Macksam said:

A lucrative Canadian TV sports contract should be in the $200 to 430 million (NHL) per annum range. The Jays I would estimate at about $200 million if you could monetize what their TV deal would theoretically be. The CFL's 40 million, while decent, isn't earth shattering, and if it really comes in at number 3, it just tells me there's a lot of opportunity for other sports entities to take hold of the Canadian psyche. 

The low salaries of the CFL is an effect, not a cause. If the revenues were higher, the salaries would be higher.

I never understood increasing the prices after moving into a new venue. Isn't the fact they are moving into a new arena suppose to help with revenues in general. I can understand if it's temporarily done to help pay for the new facility but a lot of these stadiums were paid for with public money.

I have doubts the MLB would be that big a deal, but if you got sources, a helping of crow tastes fine by me. I doubt it mainly because there are hundreds of MLB games on and the overwhelming majority of them don't get picked up or are given even slight consideration. It's really Jay's or occasionally one of the big teams up here.

As far as new stadiums, it isn't hard. New stadiums have more bells and whistles that improve the experience, ergo makes it a higher class item. This means fan pay more for more and teams pay more for their rent and management rights to said public entity. It's usually of great benefit to a municpality because the higher government absorbs the majority of the costs (usually as part of an event fund), but the ownership usually ends up with the local municpality who gain a new revenue stream.

Edited by -Hammer-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just noticed this thread. How gratifying is it (to any non-Rider fan) to see all these chickens coming home to roost. Jones can't run away as easily from his asshole personality without wins to back it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Except in Edmonton his first year IIRC wasn't so great and the second he won the GC.  I'm not a fan of his either but i don't want to see the Riders hurt by him.  Funny how they went from the home of the CAF and homegrown Sask player to Jones' American first policy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm watching a rerun of the Lions and Red Blacks game at TD Place and I amusingly saw the BC coach challenge the fact no flag was thrown on the field for a tackle he thought was "unnecessary roughness". This happened in the fourth. The tackle in question wasn't bad by any means considering it was necessary to bring the opposing player down...lol, but the decision went the Lions way and they got an extra 15 yards from that play. Unnecessary roughness calls for the most part tend to be bull shit in themselves but when coaches can pretty much call them as well...that is f*cked up. I've never seen an Ottawa sports crowd so vulgar afterwards.

Maybe the NHL should implement something like this just in case Kerry Fraser misses another five minute major :D

Edited by Macksam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently there are mid season rule changes. Haven't had time to read them, but by the headline they have to do with coaches challenges. 

 

I've been quite vocal about how the constant challenges, inconsistent application of rules from those challenges, and constant flags and stoppages are damaging the CFL and could do serious damage if not dealt with. So on the positive side, changing a rule that creates too many stoppages is a move in the right direction (assuming that's what they're doing).

On the negative side, mid season rule changes look rather bush. 

And after all that, I should just go read the article ... apparently I have the time :|

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson showing the CFL some Love
Robbie Abrahamson thesnap.ca August 26, 2016

The People’s Champion pays homage to the #CFL

He’s the Highest paid Actor in Hollywood, a 8 time WWE Champion and he credits a lot of his career success to Wally Buono cutting him from #CFL. In 1995, Dwayne Johnson was cut from the Calgary Stampeders Practice Roster, virtually facing “Rock Bottom.”

2vvrlhh.jpg

We smell what he’s tweeting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wired for Sound: CFL on TSN takes fans deeper into the game
cfl.ca Staff

TORONTO — From the sidelines to the huddle, CFL ON TSN takes fans deeper into the game this weekend with a special Live Mic Broadcast (#CFLwired) featuring in-game sound from the Calgary Stampeders and Hamilton Tiger-Cats’ quarterbacks and coaches when the two teams face off this Sunday, Aug. 28 at 7 p.m. ET on TSN.

Marking TSN’s first-ever Live Mic Broadcast of a regular season CFL game, fans will be able to hear the sounds of the game live on the field from quarterbacks Zach Collaros and Bo Levi Mitchell, as well as coaches Kent Austin and Dave Dickenson, as these GREY CUP contenders clash at Calgary’s historic McMahon Stadium.

“This Live Mic Broadcast is a next-level fan experience. Our viewers will feel like they’re standing right there in the huddle,” said Paul Graham, Vice-President and Executive Producer, Live Events, TSN. “Thanks to a great collaboration with our league partners, we’re looking forward to adding this innovative production feature to Sunday night’s game – and hearing what Bo Levi Mitchell, Zach Collaros and the coaches have to say!”

“We are excited to work with TSN and the CFL to bring our great fans closer to the game,” added Jeff Keeping, President of the CFLPA. “‎Our players take pride in connecting with the fans and this is a great opportunity to further the game day experience.”

“This is yet another example in how our 104-year-old League is leading the way in sports media innovation,” said Christina Litz, Senior Vice President, Marketing and Content, CFL. “We are privileged to have great partners in TSN and the CFLPA who share our forward-looking vision and efforts to engage our fans in new and exciting ways.”

CFL ON TSN’s Chris Cuthbert and Glen Suitor are in the booth for the Ticats-Stampeders game, with Jermain Franklin reporting from the sidelines.

Sunday’s Live Mic Broadcast also features the CFL ON TSN panel – including host Rod Smith alongside analysts Matt Dunigan and Milt Stegall – from the TSN Studio to deliver pre-game, halftime, and post-game news and analysis from this unique live broadcast.

Fans can follow photos, videos, and viral content from the CFL ON TSN’s Live Mic Broadcast on TSN’s official Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter accounts on #CFLWired.

CFL ON TSN

The 2016 CFL ON TSN season culminates with the Shaw Road to the Grey Cup as well as the 104th GREY CUP presented by Shaw – one of 60-plus iconic championship events that live on TSN – live from the Toronto Argonauts’ new home of BMO Field.

TSN subscribers can access live streaming coverage of every CFL ON TSN game on TSN.ca and the TSN GO app. French-language coverage is available through RDS.

TSN is the exclusive Canadian broadcaster of the CFL, delivering live coverage of every regular season game, including playoffs and the 104th GREY CUP live from Toronto’s BMO Field on Nov. 27. Last year, Bell Media’s TSN and RDS announced an extension of their long-term multi-platform partnership with the CFL through to 2021.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Landry: #CFLWired will give us unique window into sounds of the game
Don Landry cfl.ca

Well, this should be fun.

This Sunday night, when the Hamilton Ticats take on the Calgary Stampeders at McMahon Stadium, we’re going to get a good idea of what quarterbacks Bo Levi Mitchell and Zach Collaros as well as head coaches Kent Austin and Dave Dickenson have to say during a game.

It’s being called the “Live Mic Broadcast” and it will bring football fans closer to the heat of regular season battle than ever before.

I think we’ve all been very, very curious as to what’s being said by the quarterback as he gathers his offence just before they jog to the line of scrimmage to set up a play. Often wondered what he might be saying, if anything, to a receiver that’s either just made a spectacular grab or – gulp – just dropped an easy one. Wondered what a QB might be saying to a defensive lineman as he pats him on the head after getting up from a sack. Or – and this is a good one – what his breath sounds like as he’s scrambling for his life on a broken play. Wondered what a coach was saying under his breath – or bellowing out – during a play.

Sunday night, we wonder no more. It’ll probably feel weird at first, but we’ll get used to it quickly, I’m sure, as we get a flavour of a CFL regular season game that we’ve not experienced before.

What I’m most looking forward to is getting a better idea of the on-field demeanor that quarterbacks Zach Collaros and Bo Levi Mitchell display. We already know that they are great leaders, everybody says so.

But just what does that leadership sound like during a game? How do they manage not only the play-calling, but their teams’ respective psyches as a game rolls on with its inevitable peaks and valleys? Are Mitchell and Collaros primarily carrot or stick guys? In other words, do they mostly coax the best out of their teammates with encouragement or admonishment?

“Everybody knows they’re the most important players on the field,” said Paul Graham, TSN’s Vice President and Executive Producer, Live Events, adding that the back-up quarterbacks will also by mic’d, just in case they are pressed into action.

“We will pick and choose when the mics are on and off,” said Graham, who will have his audio team work within guidelines that have been agreed upon by both teams in order to be certain everybody’s comfortable with the situation.

The TSN crew will also work to ensure that the sound matches the pictures, so you might not hear Collaros, say, talking about one thing while the screen is showing a replay of another thing entirely. As well, if you’re wondering about spicy language, Graham says the game will actually be broadcast on a ten-second delay, to ensure that no extra salty verbiage gets through.

Graham went on to say that if this Live Mic Broadcast proves to be successful, it could very well lead to more down the road, although that is far from being determined. All parties will wait to see how Sunday goes first.

It’s the immediacy of this exercise that’s so intriguing. We have, in the past, gotten the odd bit of sideline thankfulness from a player who’s just scored a major but beyond that, most of the in-game audio we’ve been privy to has come to us after the fact. Locker room pre-game speeches shown to us later in the game. Quick conversations between players are sometimes relayed to us, but usually later that night or in the days that follow.

This will offer us a very good glimpse into personalities, I think.

While the mics will not be open for play-calling or conversations between coaches and quarterbacks that are deemed strategic in nature – understandably so – the super-heated moments of a football game will be laid bare and that is precisely where we can learn more about a player’s competitive personality. Collaros and Mitchell are, of course, well aware that they will be mic’d up but I’ll wager that will not be top of mind the moment something very good or very bad happens.

Fans in few other sports get this kind of live action insight. The sport of curling has had players mic’d up on a live basis for years and the practice quickly became vital to helping viewers understand the strategies and thought processes of the players. (By the way, although a generation of curlers has entered the sport with the expectation they’ll be mic’d up for big events, you still get the occasional moment of emotion blurted out.) Once in awhile in golf you get a snippet of a conversation between a player and caddy although it is not by any means a usual occurrence. When we do get it, though, it’s terrifically insightful.

Just what kind of new insight the Live Mic Broadcast will provide us is yet to be seen.

I’m hoping, for instance, that Ticats’ linebacker Simoni Lawrence – reputed to be one of the best chirp artists out there – gets close enough to Mitchell so that we can hear him. Even if we don’t, eavesdropping on Mitchell’s responses should be compelling. Provided, you know, he offers them. I’m kind of counting on that from a quarterback who’s shown us that he’s no shrinking violet whether it be in interviews or on social media.

While the quarterbacks will be the only players wearing the microphones, I am thinking we’ll likely have Lawrence and others in close enough proximity to pick them up too. Will we hear a receiver complain “c’mon, man, I’m open ALL DAY”? Maybe we get a nice little back and forth between Charleston Hughes and Zach Collaros. Also, we’ll maybe get to hear which of Collaros or Mitchell likes to try to work the refs to their advantage.

With the coaches’ microphones going live from the snap to the finish of each play, we will have a smaller window of opportunity to glimpse the emotions of Austin and Dickenson. Being coaches, it’s understandable they’ve decided that they don’t want to give up too much of their strategic conversations on the sidelines. Not yet, anyway. As guinea pigs for this new initiative, I’m sure they (and all coaches for that matter) would like to get the results before deciding whether to loosen the reins on any future version of this experiment.

On that, I wouldn’t hold my breath, however. With football being a highly strategic game counting, in a large way, on an ability to surprise the opponent with what you’re doing at any moment, it might not be prudent to ever open up those microphones beyond what we’re getting on Sunday night. Again, that’s fully understandable. However, there will be no hiding behind clipboards for Dickenson and Austin during plays and I feel fairly certain we’re going  to get some kind of colourful display in there somewhere.

Mic’d up quarterbacks and coaches. Like I said off the top, this should be fun.

Let the eavesdropping begin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say the Live Mic concept was revolutionary, mainly because much of the verbiage was play calling which is Latin to most people.  I would say what could have been a real audio traffic jam was well handled in its first implementation and like curling did add a new dimension to the broadcast.  .I think it will soon be a regular feature and as usual will likely be copied by the NFL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paulo Senra ‏@paulosenra 20 hours ago
2.4 million Canadians tuned into the first-ever Live Mic Broadcast regular season CFL game on TSN Sports last night.

Paulo Senra ‏@paulosenra 17 hours ago Retweeted Hamilton Tiger-Cats
The Argos vs Ticats Labour Day Classic in the Hammer is officially sold out. See you all there!

Paulo Senra ‏@paulosenra Aug 25
Seeing tons of "first CFL game" tweets/pics from Ottawa tonight. To all of you: welcome to the family!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On August 28, 2016 at 9:36 PM, Joe MacCarthy said:

I wouldn't say the Live Mic concept was revolutionary, mainly because much of the verbiage was play calling which is Latin to most people.  I would say what could have been a real audio traffic jam was well handled in its first implementation and like curling did add a new dimension to the broadcast.  .I think it will soon be a regular feature and as usual will likely be copied by the NFL.

Was it anything like this? lol

 

Edited by Macksam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CFL legend Kwong dead at 86
The Canadian Press September 3/2016

CALGARY — The China Clipper sailed to the rescue of more than one professional sports team — as a bruising football fullback, a tenacious front-office manager in the CFL and part-owner of his home-town hockey squad, the Calgary Flames.

Norman Kwong, who was the first Chinese Canadian to play in the CFL and who later served as Alberta's lieutenant governor, died Saturday at the age of 86.

"Mr. Kwong was proud to be the son of Chinese immigrants. He was an Alberta success story from an early age. From his storied career in the Canadian Football League to his later co-ownership of the Calgary Flames, he was a champion on the field of play and in life," Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said in a statement.

"He gave his time generously to non-profit and voluntary organizations across the country. His contributions to public life earned him many honours, including the Order of Canada."

A statement by Kwong's family said that he died peacefully in his sleep.

Kwong was a personable and good-natured man who regaled banquet crowds with humorous stories about his 13-year football career with the Edmonton Eskimos and Calgary Stampeders. He often jokingly referred to himself as "The Living Legend."

At 18 with the Stampeders, the Calgary-born Kwong was the youngest player to win the Grey Cup.

Kwong liked to tell the story about how, after he had fumbled the ball on his first carry three games in a row in 1952, his coach taped a football to his arm and made him wear it around for a week.

But under his smiling, easy-going street demeanour, the 5-foot 9, 190-pound Kwong was a unrelenting, ferocious running back.

His 1955 pursuit of the league rushing record exemplified his tenacity.

Trailing Winnipeg's Gerry James by 149 yards going into the last regular season game of the year, Kwong refused to give up.

The Edmonton Journal's Jim Brooke would later report on October 31, 1955 that the Eskimos' 30-5 victory over the hapless Calgary Stampeders "was secondary to the Saga of the China Clipper."

"An unstoppable human battering ram named Normie Kwong rewrote the record book at Clarke Stadium Saturday night, his flying cleats stamped the exclamation points of greatness across the hallowed pages reserved for deeds of a select few," gushed Brooke. "Only a super-human effort could guarantee success in the face of such odds. That effort was forthcoming.

"Behind the inspired blocking of his teammates, Kwong was a crashing, relentless force that would not be denied."

Number 95 rushed for 192 yards that day, smashing the record for yards in a single game, most carries in a season and most rushing attempts in a single game. He set the new season rushing mark at 1,250 yards.

The China Clipper continued his heroics in the 1955 Grey Cup against the Montreal Alouettes in Vancouver, setting records with his 30 carries and 145 yards rushing.

The Eskimos, with Kwong and Johnny Bright as their turf-pounding running back tandem and Jackie Parker and later, former Alberta Premier Don Getty, at quarterback, won that Grey Cup. They added another the next year to string together three in a row between 1954 and 1956.

When Kwong retired from playing football in 1960, he held 30 CFL records and two Schenley Awards as the league's outstanding Canadian.

He was voted Canada's athlete of the year in 1955, beating out teammate Jackie Parker and hockey legend Rocket Richard on a list of Canadian heroes that now includes such greats as Wayne Gretzky and Gordie Howe.

He rushed for 9,022 yards in his career, the third-highest total in CFL history, won four Grey Cups and gained 1,000 yards a season five times. He was selected all-Canadian five times and voted to the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1969.

His 192 yards rushing in a single game stood for 45 years until it was broken by Sean Millington in 1999.

After retiring as a player in 1960, Kwong gained weight but still kept the squat, muscular look of his playing days. He established a successful career in real estate and became part-owner and director of the National Hockey League's Calgary Flames until he sold his interest in 1994.

In 1988 Kwong became president and general manager of his former football squad, the Stampeders. Many credited him with turning around the fortunes of the near-bankrupt franchise at the gate and on the field.

He stepped down four years later but continued to be active in the community, serving as national chairman of the Canadian Consultative Council on Multiculturalism and as honorary chairman of Calgary's Easter Seal Campaign.

Kwong served as lieutenant governor of Alberta from 2005 until 2010.

"He brought an effortless dignity and warm humanity to his vice-regal duties," Notley said.

At the age of 69, Kwong was awarded the Order of Canada in 1998.

He is survived by his wife Mary, four sons and 10 grandchildren.

The family says details on funeral services will follow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...