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Update:

Three of the four political leaders in Vancouver that I requested letters of support to nominate Harry Manson for induction into several soccer and sports halls of fame have responded.

1) BC Premier Christy Clark sent the following letter on April 12, 2013, 10 days after contacting her office.

post-840-139465254868_thumb.jpg

Unfortunately, at the time I contacted Premier Clark I was unaware of the fact that she was an Honourary Trustee of the BC Sports Hall of Fame, and that it would be inappropriate to ask her to endorse a nomination over other nominations.

2) BC NDP Leader Adrian Dix has not yet responded to my request, which in light of his heavy defeat in the provincial election on Tuesday could mean that he will soon be the former Leader of the BC NDP party, and his endorsement would subsequently not carry much weight.

3) Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson extended an invitation to me to meet him at City Hall, on May 2nd. At that meeting he expressed that he would consider writing a letter in support of Harry Manson's nomination.

4) British Columbia Soccer Association President Roger Barnes has requested that the Elders of the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation be consulted before considering such a letter. I am still waiting for a reply on this matter from Snu-ney-muxw Chief White and his Council. I will be in Nanaimo next week, at which time I will try to find out if any progress has been made.

Edited by Robert

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I missed part of this attachment previously. The following is a brief update of my trip to the Island:

Today I was interviewed by Ben Ingram of the Nanaimo Daily News. The article will appear in the Saturday, May 25, 2013 issue of the Nanaimo Daily News.

I also spoke with a member of the Manson family, who will present the nomination of Harry Manson to Chief Douglas White III and his Council at the upcoming Snu-ney-muxw council meeting. This matter was postponed because of a death in the Snu-ney-muxw community.

The following is a rough draft of the cover letter for Harry Manson's nomination for induction to the BC Sports Hall of Fame:

Dear Members of the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame Selection Panel:

My name is Robert Janning and I am a soccer historian based in Vancouver. I am writing to nominate Xul-si-malt, also known as Harry Manson, for induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame in the individual Pioneer category. Harry Manson was a First Nations soccer player whose historic contributions to the game of soccer in B.C. warrant his formal recognition as a pioneering B.C. athlete.

As detailed in the table-of-contents following this cover letter, I have enclosed a letter of endorsement from the B.C. Soccer Association (this letter is still under consideration and has not been agreed to or written as of today), other letters of support, biographical information, newspaper extracts, and photographs supporting Xul-si-malt's candidacy.

I first became aware of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) and his place in B.C. soccer history several years ago while researching my book Westcoast Reign: The British Columbia Soccer Championships 1892-1905 (2012), which recounts the history of British Columbia as seen through the lens of soccer. I soon discovered that he was a gifted athlete, whose soccer career was uniquely distinguished in several ways.

Harry Manson was born into the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation on the Nanaimo Indian Reserve in 1879. The beginning of his soccer career in the late 19th century coincided with a time when interest in the sport was taking a strong hold in the Nanaimo area.

Initially, Harry played on a team comprised exclusively of players from the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation. His leadership qualities quickly earned him the team’s captaincy, a position he held for the rest of his soccer-playing days.

In due course, Harry Manson and a teammate, James Wilks, were recruited to the Nanaimo Thistles line-up, participating in the team's run for the 1898 B.C. championship title. On April 2nd, the

Snu-ney-muxw athletes became the first aboriginal players to compete in a British Columbia soccer championship match. Although Harry Manson distinguished himself within the first five minutes by scoring the game's first goal, the Thistles eventually lost the intermediate provincial championship series to the Victoria Y.M.C.A. team.

In 1899, Harry Manson played for the newly christened Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, the first aboriginal team to compete for a British Columbia soccer championship. In one of the most protracted series in the annals of B.C. provincial soccer, the Wanderers lost a closely contested and controversial five-game decision to their cross-town rivals, the Nanaimo Thistles.

By the 1902-03 season, it had been eight years since a Nanaimo club had won the senior provincial championship. Enthusiasts in the Coal City were determined to recapture the trophy they had donated to the British Columbia Football Association in 1891, when the organization was established. Since none of the clubs in the Nanaimo Association Football League were independently strong enough to succeed against the best clubs from elsewhere in the province, the decision was made to assemble a team comprising the best players from all of the clubs in the League - in essence, a Nanaimo all-star team.

Harry Manson was one of three Wanderers selected to play for the Nanaimo Association Football Team that went on to win the 1903 senior British Columbia soccer championship. With his teammates Louis Martin and Joe Peters, he thus became one of the first three B.C. aboriginal players to compete on a victorious provincial championship team.

The Nanaimo Indian Wanderers greatest triumph came in 1904, when Harry Manson and his teammates captured the Nanaimo city championship. Despite this achievement, the Nanaimo Athletic Club decided to enter a Nanaimo team in the British Columbia championship without the support of the Snu-ney-muxw players. In due course, the provincial title and trophy were lost to the Esquimalt Garrison, the same team that had been defeated by the Nanaimo Association Football Team the previous year.

Sadly, Harry Manson met an untimely death in 1912, when he was struck and killed by a moving coal train while returning from a trip to Nanaimo to obtain medicine for his sick baby son, Adam. This tragic event was reported on the front pages of the Nanaimo newspapers.

In considering the story of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) and the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, it is worth noting that they played during a time when mistreatment and public disrespect towards First Nations people was socially acceptable and common, as demonstrated by the enclosed newspaper extract. In this prevailing climate of racial intolerance, the Wanderers players laced up their boots and took to the pitch. Their fortitude and courage in doing so is a reflection of their passion for the game.

Among the Snu-ney-muxw soccer players, Harry Manson stands out for several reasons:

1. During the period from 1897 to 1906, he was the only player of either First Nations or European descent to play for all three Nanaimo premier soccer teams - the Nanaimo Thistles, the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, and the Nanaimo Association Football Team.

2. He was the captain of the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers during that entire period.

3. His reputation as an outstanding member of the team and a gifted soccer player was acknowledged in the newspaper reports that followed his death. The Nanaimo Daily Herald, for example, noted in a February 13, 1912 article that

Harry Manson was probably the best known of the Nanaimo Indians; for many years [he] played on the local senior soccer teams and was one of the best players Nanaimo has produced.

The impetus to nominate Harry Manson to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame emerged following the publication of Westcoast Reign in 2012. Questions at library readings and the curiosity evident in related conversations clearly demonstrated interest in and appreciation for the story of this exceptional B.C. athlete and his unique place in B.C. sports history. Induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would afford Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) a measure of formal recognition and appreciation that is long overdue, and would be a suitable tribute to his memory, as well as a source of inspiration for the aboriginal community and all British Columbians. Acknowledging his legacy would also be an appropriate reflection of Canadian values of inclusivity and diversity.

I am pleased to end by mentioning that a passion for soccer continues at the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation. Harry Manson’s grandson, Gary Manson, has coached the Snu-ney-muxw Snipers for over a decade, while 11-year old Logan Manson emulates his great-great grandfather's soccer talent, competing on the field against much older players. Harry Manson's induction to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would not only acknowledge his achievements of over one hundred years ago, but would also celebrate a continuing Snu-ney-muxw First Nation tradition.

Thank you for considering this nomination.

Sincerely,

Robert Janning

post-840-139465254874_thumb.jpg

Edited by Robert

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Here is my interview with the Nanaimo Daily News (Saturday, May 25, 2013)

http://digital.nanaimodailynews.com/epaper/viewer.aspx

http://www2.canada.com/nanaimodailynews/news/sports/story.html?id=7f89392e-8d39-4723-a631-97ef4af1aeda

Indigenous soccer star a forgotten Nanaimo hero

Vancouver-based historian leading push to have Harry Manson inducted into several sports halls of fame for his achievements as a First Nations footballer

Ben Ingram, Daily News

Published: Saturday, May 25, 2013

The date is April 2, 1898 and something odd has happened at the Caledonia grounds in Victoria.

The B.C. Intermediate Football Association's Nanaimo Thistles are competing for a provincial championship in the finals against Victoria YMCA, but sickness has claimed two of their right-wingers. In a bid to save their shot at the Challenge Cup title, Nanaimo turns to two players from Snuneymuxw First Nation: James Wilks and Harry Manson.

The two become the first indigenous players to take part in a provincial championship match - playing alongside the whites. Manson hits the field and finds himself in a back-and-forth match with YMCA. Suddenly, he gains control of the ball and in perfect form, sends it flying into the net with a clean kick to open the scoring, a clear indication as to why the Thistles' management has become so enamoured with the young star.

While Nanaimo storms out to a 2-0 lead, bolstered by the play of Manson, the team ultimately falls by a score of 4-3. They later lose the third match of the final series and see the Challenge Cup go to Victoria. Nevertheless, a star is born.

During the years 1897-1904, Manson captained the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers to numerous victories, including a Nanaimo City Championship in 1904. The year before, Manson had been selected from the Wanderers to play on a Nanaimo all-star team, and helped to lift the squad to a provincial championship.

Amid a climate of racial intolerance when public humiliation of indigenous people was not only commonplace, but socially acceptable, Manson broke barriers as a First Nations soccer star.

Manson's accomplishments have impelled Vancouver-based soccer historian Robert Janning, 57, to lead a push to have the forgotten star inducted into not only the Nanaimo Sports Hall of Fame, but major sporting shrines across Canada.

"My hope is that somehow, if I can get Harry inducted into one of these sports hall of fames, something positive will ripple out of that and give the First Nations community a sense of pride and celebration," said Janning. "That when school classes get invited to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame, they can make a connection: 'there's an indigenous athlete there.'"

Janning's re-discovery of Manson occurred while he worked on Westcoast Reign: The British Columbia Soccer Championships 1892-1905, an exhaustive history of footy's roots in this province that took roughly six years to compile.

A curiosity about B.C. soccer's origins had led Janning to the public library, only to find nothing on the topic.

"I quickly realized that if I wanted answers to the questions I had, that it was up to me to launch an investigation," he said.

Janning began an intensive exploration of archived materials, old newspaper clippings and microfilms. He poured through university libraries and materials at the legislature in Victoria.

Throughout the endeavour, another curiosity began to develop at the sight of the Manson name, which seemed to keep popping up in the material.

"The Snuneymuxw became involved quite early on because of their proximity to the European population," said Janning. "It was inevitable that the two alien cultures were going to have some form of social interaction. Soccer turned out to be one of those forms."

What also became evident was the intolerance Manson and his fellow athletes faced, with crowds shouting them down as 'savages' when the men laced up and hit the field.

In hopes of having Manson recognized as a pioneer in B.C. sport, Janning has made the rounds with politicians to ask for their support to have him nominated.

He has written to Premier Christy Clark and met with Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson about the topic. Next on the list are Nanaimo Mayor John Rut-tan and the Snuneymuxw band council.

But the effort also has another purpose: to correct what Janning believes is a historical injustice.

Manson was killed in 1912, run over by a train while on a trip into town to get medicine for his infant son.

That six-month-old boy went on to have eight children of his own, including Gary Manson, whose only account of his grandfather, until recently, was a coroners report on his death.

The harshly-worded document dismisses Manson as "a drunken Indian."

Janning discovered newspaper clippings that painted a different picture and ultimately, found himself on Gary's doorstep in search of information on his grandfather.

Gary and his grandfather share the same traditional name, Xulsimalt, a title that took on new significance for the Mansons when Janning arrived.

"It was kind of ugly how they portrayed him in the inquest," said Gary. "I went looking for him, because I carried his name. That was the only document on him I found. I was kind of heartbroken, actually."

The Manson family had seen soccer-related photos of their ancestor before, but never realized the extent of his involvement until they met Janning.

"History died with him, our connection to our ancestors," said Gary. "I just can't say thank-you enough to Robert Janning, the author of that book."

Janning takes solace in knowing he has the backing of the Manson family to help him further his cause.

"I believe his contributions as a person, a representative of the aboriginal community, and a Canadian sporting pioneer warrant official recognition," he wrote in a letter to numerous political leaders. "This would not only be a suitable tribute to the memory of Harry Manson, but also serve as a source of inspiration."

BIngram@nanaimodailynews.com 250-729-4228

© The Daily News (Nanaimo) 2013

"Sorry guys. I'm not very adept at placing attachments into posts. Robert"

Edited by Robert

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The effort to nominate Harry Manson is receiving more attention since the May 25, 2013 Ben Ingram article appeared in the Nanaimo Daily News. The Victoria Times-Colonist picked-up his article and published it on May 28th.

http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/historian-pushes-for-nanaimo-s-forgotten-first-nations-soccer-star-to-be-included-in-sports-hall-of-fame-1.232598

And Luke Simcoe writing from Toronto for the Victoria Metro News posted the following article today:

http://metronews.ca/news/victoria/688925/historian-wants-first-nations-soccer-star-to-be-inducted-into-hall-of-fame/

Edited by Robert

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More interest in the Harry Manson story. I received the following email from Mr. Murray Banting yesterday:

Hello Mr, Janning, I am a Board Member for the HCFC (Harbour City Football Club) in Nanaimo. We are a non-profit soccer club with over 1600 members in Nanaimo. See more at harbourcityfc.com . I read the article in the Daily Bulletin in regards to your research and story about soccer in BC and Harry MANSON. Our club the biggest soccer club on Vancouver Island and local to Nanaimo HCFC is interested in dedicating an award in his name to be given out annually at our awards banquet to one of our players age 6-20. I would like to approach either the family and the Snuneymuxw First Nation or both to offer this to them and see if they are interested in supporting this. We do have a good number of First Nations children on our club and would like to encourage more to join thus some exposure to who Harry Manson was in our group would be a great thing. We do have sponsors for our awards and this is the first year we are going to be making it an annual affair and the sponsor will become the legacy provider of this award (one time fee this year and their name stays with the award for future). I'm sure we can find a local sponsor to support this award given the historical connection to Nanaimo and soccer in our community. I do not have a copy of your book yet but do plan to purchase one soon, we have tweeted it out to all our members as well. I am writing you to ask if you could suggest a contact whom we could talk to, to discuss the award with either Snuneymuxw First Nation or the Manson family. Any suggestions that you have for this idea (for/against/suggestions) or contacts etc. would be appreciated. Sincerely, Murray Banting

I passed Murray's email on to a member of the Manson family. I'm curious to see what will come of it.

Tuesday, June 4th will be an important date, as Chief Douglas White III and the Snuneymuxw Council will decide whether or not to write a to the British Columbia Soccer Association indicating their approval to have Harry Manson nominated for several soccer and sports halls of fame. The timing of this council meeting is perfect, as the next BCSA Board of Directors meeting will be held on June 14th.

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The motion before Chief Douglas White III and the Snuneymuxw Council to write a letter supporting the nomination of Harry Manson for induction into several soccer and sports halls of fame was unanimously approved at the council meeting held on Tuesday evening, June 4, 2013.

A copy of this letter will be forwarded to Mr. Roger Barnes, the president of the British Columbia Soccer Association, so that he may present it at the BCSA Board of Directors meeting, to be held on June 14, 2013. The ultimate objective for doing so is to try and secure a letter from soccer’s provincial governing body, endorsing the nomination of Harry Manson to several soccer and sports halls of fame.

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I received the following letter today:

May 31, 2013

Nanaimo Sports Hall of Fame

British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame

Soccer Hall of Fame & Museum

Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame

Dear Sirs:

Re: Harry Xul-si-malt Manson

Please accept this letter as Snuneymuxw Chief and Council’s support for the nomination of Harry Xul’si’malt Manson to the above noted Sports Halls of Fame.

We confirm receipt of the attached request from Robert Janning who has completed research of the history of British Columbia, as seen through the lens of soccer. Mr. Janning uncovered the incredible historical story of one our Snuneymuxw First Nation members that warrants acknowledgement at this level.

Thank you on behalf of Snuneymuxw First Nation for your consideration.

Yours truly,

Chief Douglas White III Kwulasultun

I subsequent forwarded this letter to Mr. Roger Barnes, the president of the British Columbia Soccer Association with the following letter:

Dear Mr. Barnes,

I have just received the attached Snuneymuxw letter of support. In addition, I have also attached a copy of the rough draft of the nomination letter that I intend to submit to the various soccer and sports halls of fame. The latter may receive some minor corrections and revisions before I sign it, however, the basic content will remain relatively unchanged.

Thus the pertinent facts that support the nomination of Harry Manson are as follows:

1) The Manson family has given its blessing to have Harry Manson nominated.

2) The Snuneymuxw Chief and Council have given their blessing to have Harry Manson nominated.

3) During the past 11 days, the story to have Harry Manson nominated has appeared in the Nanaimo Daily News, the Victoria Times Colonist, and the Victoria Metro News.

4) The Harbour City Football Club wants to establish an award named after Harry Manson.

5) A Voyageurs Canadian Soccer Supporters thread chronicling the efforts to nominate Harry Manson has received over 45,000 views during the past two months.

I, therefore, respectfully request the British Columbia Soccer Association to consider endorsing the nomination of Harry Xul-si-malt Manson to the various soccer and sports halls of fame.

Respectfully yours,

Robert Janning

This is the second letter that I referred to in my letter to Mr. Barnes:

Dear Members of the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame Selection Panel:

My name is Robert Janning and I am a soccer historian based in Vancouver. I am writing to nominate Xul-si-malt, also known as Harry Manson, for induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame in the individual Pioneer category. Harry Manson was a First Nations soccer player whose historic contributions to the game of soccer in B.C. warrant his formal recognition as a pioneering B.C. athlete.

As detailed in the table-of-contents following this cover letter, I have enclosed a letter of endorsement from the B.C. Soccer Association, other letters of support, biographical information, newspaper extracts, and photographs supporting Xul-si-malt's candidacy.

I first became aware of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) and his place in B.C. soccer history several years ago while researching my book Westcoast Reign: The British Columbia Soccer Championships 1892-1905 (2012), which recounts the history of British Columbia as seen through the lens of soccer. I soon discovered that he was a gifted athlete whose soccer career was uniquely distinguished in several ways.

Harry Manson was born into the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation on the Nanaimo Indian Reserve in 1879. The beginning of his soccer career in the late 19th century coincided with a time when interest in the sport was taking a strong hold in the Nanaimo area.

Initially, Harry played on a team comprised exclusively of players from the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation. His leadership qualities quickly earned him the team’s captaincy, a position he held for the rest of his soccer-playing days.

In due course, Harry Manson and a teammate, James Wilks, were recruited to the Nanaimo Thistles line-up, participating in the team's run for the 1898 B.C. championship title. On April 2nd, the

Snu-ney-muxw athletes became the first aboriginal players to compete in a British Columbia soccer championship match. Although Harry Manson distinguished himself within the first five minutes by scoring the game's first goal, the Thistles eventually lost the intermediate provincial championship series to the Victoria Y.M.C.A. team.

In 1899, Harry Manson played for the newly christened Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, the first aboriginal team to compete for a British Columbia soccer championship. In one of the most protracted series in the annals of B.C. provincial soccer, the Wanderers lost a closely contested and controversial five-game decision to their cross-town rivals, the Nanaimo Thistles.

By the 1902-03 season, it had been eight years since a Nanaimo club had won the senior provincial championship. Enthusiasts in the Coal City were determined to recapture the trophy they had donated to the British Columbia Football Association in 1891, when the organization was established. Since none of the clubs in the Nanaimo Association Football League were independently strong enough to succeed against the best clubs from elsewhere in the province, the decision was made to assemble a team comprising the best players from all of the clubs in the League - in essence, a Nanaimo all-star team.

Harry Manson was one of three Wanderers selected to play for the Nanaimo Association Football Team that went on to win the 1903 senior British Columbia soccer championship. With his teammates Louis Martin and Joe Peters, he thus became one of the first three B.C. aboriginal players to compete on a victorious provincial championship team.

The Nanaimo Indian Wanderers greatest triumph came in 1904, when Harry Manson and his teammates captured the Nanaimo city championship. Despite this achievement, the Nanaimo Athletic Club decided to enter a Nanaimo team in the British Columbia championship without the support of the Snu-ney-muxw players. In due course, the provincial title and trophy were lost to the Esquimalt Garrison, the same team that had been defeated by the Nanaimo Association Football Team the previous year.

Sadly, Harry Manson met an untimely death in 1912, when he was struck and killed by a moving coal train while returning from a trip to Nanaimo to obtain medicine for his sick baby son, Adam. This tragic event was reported on the front pages of the Nanaimo newspapers.

In considering the story of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) and the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, it is worth noting that they played during a time when mistreatment and public disrespect towards First Nations people was socially acceptable and common, as demonstrated by the enclosed newspaper extract. In this prevailing climate of racial intolerance, the Wanderers players laced up their boots and took to the pitch. Their fortitude and courage in doing so is a reflection of their passion for the game.

Among the Snu-ney-muxw soccer players, Harry Manson stands out for several reasons:

1. During the period from 1897 to 1906, he was the only player of either First Nations or European descent to play for all three Nanaimo premier soccer teams - the Nanaimo Thistles, the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, and the Nanaimo Association Football Team.

2. He was the captain of the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers during that entire period.

3. His reputation as an outstanding member of the team and a gifted soccer player was acknowledged in the newspaper reports that followed his death. The Nanaimo Daily Herald, for example, noted in a February 13, 1912 article that

Harry Manson was probably the best known of the Nanaimo Indians; for many years [he] played on the local senior soccer teams and was one of the best players Nanaimo has produced.

The impetus to nominate Harry Manson to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame emerged following the publication of Westcoast Reign in 2012. Questions at library readings and the curiosity evident in related conversations clearly demonstrated interest in and appreciation for the story of this exceptional B.C. athlete and his unique place in B.C. sports history. Induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would afford Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) a measure of formal recognition and appreciation that is long overdue, and would be a suitable tribute to his memory, as well as a source of inspiration for the aboriginal community and all British Columbians. Acknowledging his legacy would also be an appropriate reflection of Canadian values of inclusivity and diversity.

I am pleased to end by mentioning that a passion for soccer continues at the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation. Harry Manson’s grandson, Gary Manson, has coached the Snu-ney-muxw Snipers for over a decade, while 11-year old Logan Manson emulates his great-great grandfather's soccer talent, competing on the field against much older players. Harry Manson's induction to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would not only acknowledge his achievements of over one hundred years ago, but would also celebrate a continuing Snu-ney-muxw First Nation tradition.

Thank you for considering this nomination.

Sincerely,

Robert Janning

Edited by Robert

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More interest in the Harry Manson story. I received the following email from Mr. Murray Banting yesterday:

Hello Mr, Janning, I am a Board Member for the HCFC (Harbour City Football Club) in Nanaimo. We are a non-profit soccer club with over 1600 members in Nanaimo. See more at harbourcityfc.com . I read the article in the Daily Bulletin in regards to your research and story about soccer in BC and Harry MANSON. Our club the biggest soccer club on Vancouver Island and local to Nanaimo HCFC is interested in dedicating an award in his name to be given out annually at our awards banquet to one of our players age 6-20. I would like to approach either the family and the Snuneymuxw First Nation or both to offer this to them and see if they are interested in supporting this. We do have a good number of First Nations children on our club and would like to encourage more to join thus some exposure to who Harry Manson was in our group would be a great thing. We do have sponsors for our awards and this is the first year we are going to be making it an annual affair and the sponsor will become the legacy provider of this award (one time fee this year and their name stays with the award for future). I'm sure we can find a local sponsor to support this award given the historical connection to Nanaimo and soccer in our community. I do not have a copy of your book yet but do plan to purchase one soon, we have tweeted it out to all our members as well. I am writing you to ask if you could suggest a contact whom we could talk to, to discuss the award with either Snuneymuxw First Nation or the Manson family. Any suggestions that you have for this idea (for/against/suggestions) or contacts etc. would be appreciated. Sincerely, Murray Banting

I passed Murray's email on to a member of the Manson family. I'm curious to see what will come of it.

Dear Mr. Banting,

My apologies for taking a week to respond to your email dated June 1, 2013. The endeavour to nominate Harry Manson for induction into various soccer and sports halls of fame has taken up far more of my time this past week than I had anticipated.

I was pleasantly surprised to learn of your idea to honour Harry Manson by having the Harbour City Football Club, of which you are a Board Member, establish an award named after this incredible athlete.

In response to your request for the name of a person to contact from either the Manson family and/or the Snuneymuxw First Nation, I phoned Mr. Gary Manson the same day I received your email and passed on your phone number. In a subsequent phone conversation with Mr. Manson, I was informed that he had in principal agreed to your proposed idea.

In your email you had also invited me to offer any thoughts (for/against/suggestions) that I might have with regard to your proposal. Having had a week to contemplate the idea, during which time I had an opportunity to meet and discuss this matter with Chief Douglas White III and 3 Councillors from the Snuneymuxw Nation, several thoughts have come to mind.

I was thrilled beyond words that you came up with such a wonderful idea and are willing to bring it to fruition. You conveyed that the proposed award would be given out on an annual basis to one of your players between the ages of 6 to 20 years of age. With this end in view, I am curious to find out what the criteria would be for giving out this award? Would it be based on the number of goals a player scored over the course of a season, or the number of shut-outs recorded during a year?

When considering the criteria, I believe it is very important to remember that Harry Manson played during a time when soccer was not a money making proposition, and that he played for various “white teams” because of his love for the game. Despite the racial abuse he and his Snuneymuxw mates were subjected to during those matches, they dauntlessly continued to play. This shows class and character, especially when one takes into consideration this obvious and unjust way of treating people who are “not like you.”

I therefore believe that the recipients should understand the meaning behind the award. From my research it is clear that as a man, Harry Manson was not just a good soccer player, it was the essence of him that came shining through.

It is equally clear that a man, 100 years after his passing, can still be a good influence in our world. What an honour to be remembered in such a manner, would you not agree?

In conclusion I would like to suggest that you ask Mr. Manson to reconsider your offer to find a corporate sponsor for the Harry Manson Award. I believe it would be mutually beneficial to all parties concerned to have a strong corporate voice promoting the story of Harry Manson to the world at large.

One way to ensure that this message is carried would be to have the corporate sponsor donate a copy of my book to the recipients of the Harry Manson Award over the next decade.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Respectfully,

Robert Janning

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Some interesting new developments with regard to the Harry Manson Award according to Mr. Banting's email that follows:

Hi Robert, Ok, I was thinking the award would go to a player who in some way reflected a high level of tolerance or perseverance and or perhaps overcoming a hardship within the year. This I think would be reflective of what Harry Manson was forced to do and he must have had incredible stamina and love for the game to do what he did in that era. On the same note it could go to a player that shows a real love of the game whether they are a star or not wouldn’t matter (ie the kid that always is there rain or shine or snow or sleet etc.) Gary Manson had suggested that the award go to a First Nations player and we could do that if that is their wish, this of course would limit the number of candidates and I would like to discuss with them that it be open to all kids as it would help to spread the knowledge of who Harry Manson was to the broader community I think in that case. The physical award will be (as all are) , a trophy or plaque that is permanently on display at the HCFC clubhouse and each recipients name and year are engraved, I like the idea of adding a autographed book from you to each annual recipient. The cost for the sponsorship is $ 750.00 and this is a one time cost to cover the trophy, etc. and the sponsors name will stay with that award for the long term. I think a good corporate sponsor would jump at the opportunity to associate themselves with this one, but the band could also be a nice fit . I can see a plaque with a photo of Harry from your book as the center piece being something that would add some personal connection to the award as well.

Feel free to comment or add to any of this. Sincerely, Murray

It's another busy week. Off to the Island on Wednesday. Hopefully there will be a meeting with the parties concerned regarding the Harbour City FC's proposal. Also, on Friday, June 14th, the BCSA has its Board of Directors meeting. Hopefully there will be word on whether or not the BCSA endorses Harry Manson's nomination for induction to the various soccer and sports halls of fame.

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The Manson family has asked Heiltsuk artist Fred Anderson to come up with a cover-design for Harry Manson's nomination presentation. This is his picture.

post-840-139465254884_thumb.jpg

The following is a link to some more of Fred's artwork

http://sdrv.ms/MaJGEW

Edited by Robert

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I just returned from the Island. This morning I met with Mr. Murray Banting, director of the Harbour City Football Club, and Mr. Gary Manson, Harry Manson’s grandson, to discuss some of the details concerning the proposed Harry Manson Award, which the club would like to present to the first recipient this coming September.

It was mutually agreed that:

1) The Harry Manson award should be inscribed with a brief description of who Harry Manson was and what he stood for.

2) The recipient of the Harry Manson award should, over the course of a season, exhibit qualities which are indicative of Harry Manson’s character. These attributes need not be limited to a specified list.

3) Mr. Gary Manson, or another member of the Manson family, will present the Harry Manson award to the recipient.

It was also agreed in principal that:

4) All members of the Harbour City Football Club would be considered eligible for the Harry Manson award.

The other matter of importance today is the BCSA Board of Directors meeting that is being held as I write. The question of whether or not the provincial governing body will endorse the Harry Manson’s nomination for induction into several soccer and sports halls of fame will be put forth at this meeting.

Edited by Robert

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Great news! A few hours ago I met with Mr. Roger Barnes, president of the BCSA, who informed me that the BCSA's Board of Directors had voted unanimously in favour to write a letter of support for Harry Manson last night.

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I received the following letter from Ottawa last week:

SKMBT_36313062510310.pdf

It is only 98 days until the deadline for submitting nominations to the BC Sports Hall of Fame. Hopefully, by the end of this month I will have received letters of support from Mr. Roger Barnes of the British Columbia Soccer Association and Mr. Bob Lenarduzzi of the Vancouver Whitecaps Football Club.

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Ben Ingram wrote the following article on Harry Manson in today's issue of the Nanaimo Daily News:

http://www.nanaimodailynews.com/sports/campaign-gains-steam-for-manson-s-induction-to-hall-1.524303

Campaign gains steam for Manson's induction to hall

Ben Ingram / Daily News

July 14, 2013

Support to have Snuneymuxw First Nation soccer star Harry Manson inducted into various hall of fames across the country continues to grow.

Vancouver Whitecaps FC president Bob Lenarduzzi was the latest to throw support behind Manson, when he penned a recommendation letter this month calling on sporting shrines to induct the soccer star who broke down barriers as a First Nations athlete during the early 20th century.

"Manson's induction would allow the public to celebrate his life and honour his contributions to soccer, the aboriginal community, and to British Columbia," Lenarduzzi wrote in a July letter.

Vancouver-based soccer historian Robert Janning has worked to spread the story of Manson since he discovered the young Snuneymuxw man while working on a history of the sport's roots in B.C.

Manson was killed in 1912, run over by a train while on a trip into town to get medicine for his infant son.

That six-month-old boy went on to have eight children of his own, including Gary Manson, whose only account of his grandfather until Janning came knocking was a coroners report on his death.

Many of his contributions were forgotten until Janning uncovered them in archived newspapers and other contemporary materials.

Manson captained the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers from 1897-1904 and was one of the first two indigenous soccer players to play in a provincial championship game.

"His audacity and passion for the game of soccer makes him the ideal candidate to be inducted into the Soccer Hall of Fame," wrote Lenarduzzi, who offered support for Manson on behalf of the Whitecaps organization.

Manson's induction was also recommended by Assembly of First Nations national chief Shawn Atleo in a June 27 letter to the Soccer Hall of Fame in Vaughan, Ont.

"Manson's efforts, in the late 1800s, call for recognition as his skills as an athlete propelled him beyond barriers of race and community," Atleo wrote. "His induction . . . would give young First Nations athletes across the province and Canada another role model who can inspire and motivate them to pursue their dreams."

Snuneymuxw First Nation and chief Doug White wrote a letter in late-May that asked for the support for Janning's initiative and sent it to numerous hall of fames in the country.

Harbour City FC has also reportedly begun work on the creation of an award in Manson's honour, one that may become regularly bestowed on athletes who carry on the Snuneymuxw athlete's legacy of success.

According to Janning, the British Columia Soccer Association has also thrown its support behind Manson.

BIngram@nanaimodailynews.com 250-729-4228

/ MANSON;

© Copyright 2013

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I received the following promised letter(s) from Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson on Wednesday, July 17th:

post-840-139465254952_thumb.jpg

I am currently on the Island. Went to Nanaimo Mayor John Ruttan's office yesterday and was promised a letter of support from him. Tonight I am dinner guest of the Manson family, on the Snuneymuxw First Nation Reserve. This will more than likely be the last time that I meet with them before the Harry Manson nominations are submitted, as the 2014 deadlines for doing so are as follows:

The Soccer Hall of Fame and Museum, in Vaughan, Ontario - September 30, 2013

BC Sports Hall of Fame, in Vancouver, British Columbia - October 1, 2013

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame, in Calgary, Alberta - January 1, 2014

Nanaimo Museum's Sports Hall of Fame, in Nanaimo, British Columbia - February or March of 2014

Edited by Robert

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With the submission deadlines fast approaching, I intend to include the following biographical information in Harry Manson's nomination presentations (barring, of course, any last-minute edits):

Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson): Portrait of a Champion

The story of First Nations soccer player Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) and his team, the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, begins in the early 1890s at a time when interest in soccer was rapidly growing in the coal-producing region around the town of Nanaimo on eastern Vancouver Island. The sport had been introduced to British Columbia by British settlers, with the first documented games taking place in Victoria in 1888 and Vancouver in 1889.

One of the earliest clubs had been formed in Nanaimo, in 1890. Enthusiasm for soccer quickly spread throughout the Nanaimo mining district, soon reaching the five neighbouring First Nations villages situated along the estuary of the Nanaimo River. The villages, Salaxal, Anwinic, Yicaxen, Tewaxan and Kwelsiwal, comprised the Hul’qumi’num-speaking Snuneymuxw First Nation and were contained within the Nanaimo Indian Reserve, which had been decreed by the government in 1877.

Following their introduction to the game of soccer, the Snuneymuxw participated in random matches against Nanaimo-based European teams. The first such match was played on November 12, 1892 at Deverill Square on Haliburton Street. The event featured a team comprised of young First Nations men from the Nanaimo Reserve who took on the Nanaimo YMCA Juniors. Both sides were well-supported and the large crowd enjoyed an exciting contest ending in a 2-2 draw.

Future soccer skirmishes between Snuneymuxw and European teams remained sporadic until the formation of the Nanaimo Thistles AFC in 1897. From that point on, a full-fledged rivalry developed between the Thistles and the Snuneymuxw team, whose colourfully named members included River Billy, Red-Horned Sam, Skookum, Mushface, Klondyke, Red Necktie, Clams and Kickhard.

The Snuneymuxw players took to the pitch during a time when mistreatment and public disrespect towards First Nations people was socially acceptable and common. An article in the Nanaimo Free Press, for example, reported that a Ladysmith fan cried "Kill the savages" during a match between the two towns in 1907 at which Nanaimo fielded a team comprising both European and Snuneymuxw players. The article went on to praise the hometown indigenous players with the statement that "the savages are all past masters in the football art." Despite such open and prevalent racism, however, the Snuneymuxw players persisted in their pursuit of soccer glory.

The most outstanding of the indigenous players was Xul-si-malt (One-Who-Leaves-His-Mark), born in 1879. Little is known of Xul-si-malt’s family background and early life except that he was born during a time of increasing European settlement and was compelled at a young age to assume the English name "Harry Manson."

On September 2, 1897, at the age of 18, Harry Manson made his competitive debut in the first Thistles vs. Snuneymuxw match. The game, marred by a heavy gale and torrents of rain, was contested on a parcel of land owned by the New Vancouver Coal and Land Company, which locals appropriately referred to as the Swamp. A newspaper account of this match mentions that "pyramids of red (sic) and white men, piled up four and five decks high" formed regularly throughout the match. The game ended in a 4-4 draw and left both sides keen to meet again. This occurred in another two closely contested games during the 1897-1898 season, but only the Thistles chose to enter the competition for the British Columbia Intermediate Challenge Cup.

As the Thistles progressed through the provincial competition, it became necessary for the team to defeat both the Cowichan AFC and the Northfield Violets in the last two matches of the North End semi-final series to advance to the best-of-three final series against the Victoria YMCA. The Thistles won the first match in Nanaimo but were compelled by illness to make several line-up changes for their return match in Victoria. Impressed by the performance of Harry Manson and another Snuneymuxw player, James Wilks, earlier in the season, the Thistles hastily recruited the two players into their line-up. Harry Manson and James Wilks thus became the first indigenous players to compete in a B.C. provincial championship match. Harry wasted little time leaving his mark by scoring the game’s opening goal after only five minutes, but the Victoria YMCA team, including Bernard Schwengers, the best all-round athlete in British Columbia at the time, proved to be too strong for the Thistles. The Victoria YMCA team came from behind to win both the game and the series, capturing the intermediate provincial soccer title.

Two years later, the Snuneymuxw players, convinced that they had the necessary talent to compete against the best intermediate teams in British Columbia, formally organized the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers AFC. The Wanderers entered the intermediate provincial championship and were matched against the Nanaimo Thistles for a best-of-three semi-final series.

Harry Manson’s athletic abilities and his leadership qualities on the pitch had earned him the captaincy of the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers as they squared off against the rival Thistles in one of the most bitterly contested series in the annals of B.C. provincial soccer. The series opened at the Nanaimo Cricket Grounds, on December 16, 1899. Despite poor field conditions -- the result of intermittent snowfalls during the previous twenty-four hours -- a large crowd showed up to witness the game. After an early strike by the Wanderers, the Thistles responded with three unanswered goals to take a 3-1 lead going into the second half. The Wanderers, however, were not to be denied a strong showing in their provincial debut and drew level by scoring two goals in the final twenty minutes. Since the game had started at 3:30 in the afternoon on one of the shortest days of the year, the lack of natural light ruled out any possibility of continuing into overtime. The match was declared a draw and a rematch was called.

The rematch was held at the Cricket Grounds on New Year’s Day, with the Thistles gaining a controversial 3-2 victory. There was doubt about the validity of one their goals and the Wanderers argued that the match had not been won fairly. Some of the five hundred spectators believed that the Indians were justified in making this claim. After the match, several Wanderers stopped by the Nanaimo Free Press office to complain that they had not been beaten fairly and that the final score should have been a tie. They said that it was not a matter of who won the cup, as long as it was fairly won, and that all they wanted was an even show. Their protest was brought before the British Columbia Intermediate Football Association (BCIFA) at a meeting in Victoria on January 6, 1900, but in the end, the BCIFA upheld referee Frank English’s decision and allowed the goal and the Thistles’ victory to stand.

That same day a crowd of about 300 spectators gathered for the next game between the Thistles and Wanderers. The Cricket Grounds were in a very poor state as it had rained throughout the day. Frank English was again the man in charge and the contest remained scoreless until the second half, when the Wanderers made two magnificent rushes, scoring a goal on each occasion. Despite conceding an own goal, they managed to hold on for a 2-1 victory, forcing another match.

On January 20, 1900, a crowd of five hundred spectators showed up at the Cricket Grounds to witness the fourth match of the series. Following the controversial second game, it seemed that momentum had swung in favour of the Wanderers. The Snuneymuxw opened the scoring and appeared to be well on their way to clinching the series. However, with their backs to the wall, the Thistles braced up and were able to score an equalizer in the second half to keep their hopes alive. The 1-1 result left the two rivals level at two draws and one victory each.

The question of "Coal City" supremacy was finally settled on February 3, 1900. In a sharp departure from the closely contested pattern of the first four games, the final match of the series ended in a resounding 6-1 victory for the Thistles. The series had proved to be the most protracted provincial series thus far. Originally slated to be a best-of-three affair, it ultimately required five meetings on the pitch and a questionable decision before a winner could be declared.

The Thistles went on to claim the 1900 intermediate provincial championship, easily defeating the Victoria Columbias 7-0 and 3-0 in the final series. The victory made the manner in which the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers had lost to the Thistles that much harder to bear and may have been the reason that the Snuneymuxw players showed little interest in soccer the following year. The only time the Wanderers assembled a team during the 1900-1901 season was for a Christmas Day contest against the Thistles, at which they showed up in such poor condition that their rivals were able to run up the score at will.

The 1901-02 season proved to be a major disappointment as the BCIFA failed to receive sufficient entries to support an intermediate championship. The aborted competition had notable consequences for Nanaimo, as it saw the demise of the Nanaimo Thistles a few months later, which was followed by the formation of the Nanaimo City Association Football League (NCAFL) on September 27, 1902. Most of the former Thistle players joined either the Nanaimo Athletic Club or the Mosquito Athletic Club, both of which entered teams in the city championship. A third team, the Temperance Strollers, was comprised of players belonging to the Total Abstinence Beneficiary Brotherhood, a society whose members had taken an oath of abstinence from tobacco and alcohol. These developments renewed interest in soccer on the Nanaimo Indian Reserve and the Wanderers were keen to get in on the action. Captained once again by Harry Manson, they remained in contention for the city championship until the final match of the schedule, which they lost 4-3 to the Athletics.

Following the success of the first NCFAL season, Nanaimo organizers were determined to recapture the senior provincial Challenge Cup which the city had lost eight years earlier. Since none of the four NCAFL clubs was considered strong enough to win the senior provincial championship, it was decided to form a Nanaimo all-star team. Robert Vipond of the Nanaimo Athletic Club was responsible for choosing the players to represent Nanaimo in the British Columbia Football Association (BCFA) competition, assembling a team that included three members of the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers team -- Harry Manson, Louis Martin and Joe Peters.

The Nanaimo team was paired with the Cowichan AFC in a semi-final home-and-home series, the first match to be played at the Nanaimo Cricket Grounds on February 14, 1903. The Nanaimo all-star selection proved to be far too strong for the visitors, scoring three goals in each half en route to an easy 6-0 victory. When the return match was played at the Duncans on February 28, 1903, the Nanaimo all-star team completed a series sweep with a 2-0 victory over the Cowichan AFC, earning the right to take on the Esquimalt Garrison FC for the senior Challenge Cup.

The final was played on April 18, 1903 at the Nanaimo Cricket Grounds. The venue had been subjected to heavy rain earlier in the day but the weather cleared in time for the start of the game. William Graham gave the home side a 1-0 lead just before half-time, with Arthur Morrison adding a second goal early in the second half, followed shortly by a third goal after a scrimmage in front of the Garrison’s goal. The soldiers were upset that the third goal was allowed to stand and from that point the play became very rough. Both teams had a player sent off before Louis Martin closed out the scoring. Nanaimo thus ended their eight-year senior Challenge Cup drought with a convincing 4-0 victory and Harry Manson, Louis Martin and Joe Peters became the first indigenous players to win a provincial championship.

The 1903-04 competition for the Nanaimo City Championship began sluggishly, as the Mosquitoes refused to show up for their initial match against the Athletics. This prompted the NCAFL to hold a meeting on October 24, 1903 at which organizers decided that two Athletics players, Joe Blundell and George White, would be transferred to the Mosquitoes to even out the strength of the respective teams. The rescheduled game was played on October 31, 1903 with the Athletics securing a 2-0 victory. Just a week later, however, the Athletics suffered their first-ever defeat, losing 4-3 to the Indian Wanderers.

The race for the Nanaimo City Championship again went right down to the wire, as the Indian Wanderers held a 1-point lead over the Athletics going into the final match of the season. The green-shirted Wanderers demonstrated their superiority for a second time with a comfortable 4-0 victory in the return match, proving that their initial victory over the Athletics had been no fluke. The mere four lines that the Nanaimo Free Press devoted to the May 21, 1904 contest reflected the measure of disappointment that the "Coal City" experienced over the Athletics' loss. Captain Harry Manson and his teammates had to wait until November 1, 1904 to be presented with their medals for winning the Nanaimo City Championship, as they had to be ordered from Shilcock of Birmingham, England.

The conclusion of the 1903-1904 season brought to an end a very exciting time for the game of soccer in Nanaimo. As the result of a political power struggle for control of the game in British Columbia, soccer in Nanaimo fell into a relative state of self-imposed exile and obscurity, with very little soccer activity taking place in the “Coal City.” During this period, Harry Manson went on to develop a keen interest in baseball and started playing first-base for the Nanaimo Reliance Baseball Club in 1906.

Apart from his outstanding career as an athlete, little is known of Harry Manson except that he was married to Lucy Sampson and worked as a commercial fisherman. Sadly, his life came to end on February 10, 1912 when, at the age of 32, he was crushed beneath the wheels of a moving coal train while returning from a trip to Nanaimo to fetch medicine for his sick baby son, Adam. The esteem in which he was held by the Nanaimo community was evident in the fact that this tragic event was reported on the front page of two Nanaimo newspapers, the Nanaimo Free Press and the Nanaimo Daily Herald.

While all of the Snuneymuxw players are to be respected for the enthusiasm that they brought to soccer and their persistence despite the racial slurs to which they were frequently subjected, Harry Manson has a unique claim. During the period from 1897 to 1905, he was the only player of either First Nations or European descent to play for all three Nanaimo premier soccer teams - the Nanaimo Thistles, the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, and the Nanaimo Association Football Team. He was also the captain of the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers during the entire period and his skill and fame were widely known. As the Nanaimo Daily Herald acknowledged three days after his death:

Harry Manson was probably the best known of the Nanaimo Indians; for many years [he] played on the local senior soccer teams and was one of the best players Nanaimo has produced.

Notwithstanding Harry Manson's untimely death, his soccer legacy continues at the Snuneymuxw First Nation. Harry Manson’s grandson, Gary Manson, has coached the Snuneymuxw Snipers for over a decade and 11-year old Logan Manson emulates his great-great grandfather's soccer talent, competing on the field against much older players.

Harry Manson's Snuneymuxw name, Xul-si-malt (One-Who-Leaves-His-Mark) is fitting. As the story of his soccer achievements demonstrates, he did leave his mark and has earned his place in soccer history.

Edited by Robert

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I have written four seperate cover letters, one to each of the Halls of Fame in question. The following is an almost final draft of the one that I intend to send to the BC Sports Hall of Fame;

Dear Members of the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame Selection Committee:

My name is Robert Janning and I am a soccer historian based in Vancouver. I am writing to nominate Xul-si-malt, also known as Harry Manson, for induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame in the individual Pioneer category. Harry Manson was a First Nations soccer player whose historic contributions to the game of soccer in B.C. warrant his formal recognition as a pioneering B.C. athlete.

I became aware of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) and his place in B.C. soccer history several years ago while researching my book Westcoast Reign: The British Columbia Soccer Championships 1892-1905 (2012), which recounts the history of B.C. as seen through the lens of soccer. I discovered that he was a gifted athlete whose soccer career was uniquely distinguished in several respects. A detailed account of his life and sporting achievements is provided in the enclosed essay, "Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson): Portrait of a Champion." As the accompanying letters demonstrate, the nomination of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) enjoys strong support from the following gentlemen:

Mr. Shawn Atleo, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations

Mr. Bob Lenarduzzi, president of the Vancouver Whitecaps FC

Mr. Paul Mullen, executive director of Soccer BC

Mr. Gregor Robertson, mayor of the City of Vancouver

Mr. Douglas White III, chief of the Snuneymuxw First Nation

Because his soccer achievements pre-date both Canadian and international soccer championships, Harry Manson had no opportunity to excel as a representative of B.C. soccer on the national or international stage. His claim to recognition lies in his trailblazing leadership as a First Nations athlete, who, uniquely among his Aboriginal teammates, played on all three Nanaimo premier soccer teams during the period from 1897 to 1906, captained the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers during the entire period, and was acknowledged in the local press as "one of the best players Nanaimo has produced" after his untimely death in 1912. In this respect, his success as a First Nations' leader and player in a prevailing climate of racism and discrimination parallels that of previous B.C. Sports Hall of Fame inductee Quene Yip (1998), who played soccer for the Vancouver Chinese Students Athletic Club in the 1920s and 1930s.

The impetus to nominate Harry Manson to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame arose following the publication of Westcoast Reign in 2012. Questions at library readings and the curiosity evident in related conversations clearly demonstrated interest in the story of this exceptional B.C. athlete and his place in B.C. sporting history. Induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would afford Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) a measure of formal recognition and appreciation that is long overdue and would be a suitable tribute to his memory, as well as a source of inspiration for the aboriginal community and all British Columbians. Acknowledging his legacy would also be a reflection of Canadian values of inclusivity and diversity.

Harry Manson's induction into the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would be especially appropriate in 2014. The Truth and Reconciliation of Canada, mandated to learn the truth about what happened in the residential schools and to inform all Canadians about what happened, will be visiting B.C. to host a National Event in September 2013. The Commission hopes to "guide and inspire Aboriginal peoples and Canadians in a process of reconciliation and renewed relationships that are based on mutual understanding and respect." Highlighting the career and achievements of Xul-si-malt (Harry Manson) through induction to the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame would offer a measure of support to this worthy goal.

Sincerely,

Robert Janning

Edited by Robert

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