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Robert

A Voyageurs book launch.

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In light of the concerns that have been expressed regarding the shipping costs, unfortunately these are the parcel rate that the post office charges for a book of this size and weight, I have decided to offer free delivery in Vancouver. Also, I will be in Nanaimo on Thursday, February 2nd, in Victoria the first week in April, and in Toronto on June 12th for anyone interested in obtaining a copy. Further inquiries can be made at soccerbook@hotmail.com

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A review of Westcoast Reign can be viewed online in Vol. 26, No. 1 issue of BC BOOKWORLD at http://www.abcbookworld.com/newspaper_files/newspaper_2012_1.pdf The review appears on page 20.

There will also be a book launch on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the Level 3 Meeting Room of the Vancouver Public Library, 350 West Georgia Street. http://www.vpl.ca/cgi-bin/Calendar/calendar.cgi

I look forward to meeting you there. Signed copies of the book will be available for purchase, with no HST or delivery charges.

Edited by Robert

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A review of Westcoast Reign can be viewed online in Vol. 26, No. 1 issue of BC BOOKWORLD at http://www.abcbookworld.com/newspape...per_2012_1.pdf The review appears on page 20.

There will also be a book launch on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the Level 3 Meeting Room of the Vancouver Public Library, 350 West Georgia Street. http://www.vpl.ca/cgi-bin/Calendar/calendar.cgi

I look forward to meeting you there. Signed copies of the book will be available for purchase, with no HST or delivery charges.

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I attended 4 BC Provincial Cup matches this past weekend. One at Ambleside Turf, in West Vancouver, and three at Gates Turf in Port Coquitlam. A couple of the matches were exciting right until the end and the overall quality of play was entertaining enough to ensure that I stayed for over six hours on Saturday. This coming Saturday I will be attending the Nanaimo FC vs. Port Moody Gunners match at the Port Moody Town Centre Turf, and on Sunday I will be at the Westside FC vs. Peach Arch Dragons match at Trillium Turf, in Vancouver. Copies of my book will be available at both matches.

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FYI - The Vancouver Island Regional Library will host an Author Reading, featuring yours truly, at 6 p.m., on May 17th, at the Harbourfront Library, which is located at Diana Krall Plaza, 90 Commercial Street, Nanaimo.

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Hi Robert,Sorry to take so long to get back to you, but things can get hectic around here.Back on June 2/3 I spent some time with Les Jones and was finally able to get hold of your book.Nice job. I really liked it. It fills in a big gap in the history of soccer in Canada. Some thing that needed researching and compiling for many years. So you have made a major contribution to our knowledge of the past.I can't say I have read it all, but the Statistical Review at the end of each season, tells the story and makes it easy to refer to, and then I was able to go back and learn more.I will recommend it to anyone else I know that is interested.Now I hope that you will tackle the years following 1904-05, where I have a lot of loose ends, and lead up to the start of the 1920s. My book on the history of the game coast to coast has yet to be published. The CSA has had it since early February, and the last I heard was that they were waiting for the French translation to be completed. Best wishes and congratulations on a job well done.Colin Jose.

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I have secured three additional dates for book presentations.

WHEN: Thursday, January 31, 2013, 7-8:30 pm

WHERE: Lynn Valley Main Library Community Room, Lynn Valley Village 1277 Lynn Valley Road, North Vancouver

http://www.nvdpl.ca/adults/events/lynn/bc%E2%80%99s-soccer-heritage

WHEN: Tuesday, February 19, 2013, 7-9 pm

WHERE: New Westminster Public Library Auditorium, 716 – 6th Avenue, New Westminster

http://www.nwpl.ca/events_programmes/index/events7823/2013-02.php

WHEN: Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 7:30-9:00 pm

WHERE: West Vancouver Memorial Library, 1950 Marine Drive, West Vancouver

http://www.westvanlibrary.ca/event/calendar.php?month=MAR

Edited by Robert

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New Westminster Public Library presents:

Our Sports Heritage

with author Robert Janning

Tuesday, February 19, 2013, 7:00 pm

716 – 6th Avenue, New Westminster

Seating is limited and registration is required. To register, call 604-527-4667.

Author Robert Janning will read and discuss his book, WESTCOAST REIGN, a historical account of the early days of soccer in British Columbia, spanning the period from 1888 to 1905.

All of those attending the New Westminster Public Library reading may purchase a copy of WESTCOAST REIGN at a 30% discount.

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I have decided to see how I measure up against other historical writers in British Columbia and entered my book for the Lieutenant-Governor’s Medal for Historical Writing. This is the 30th annual competition, and thus far no book on sports has ever won. Last year, only one of the 46 entries was a sports book, and by chance, it also happened to be on soccer. Unfortunately, it was not selected as one of the three prize winners, nor did it receive honourable mention.

http://bchistory.ca/awards/book/Entries2011.pdf

Maybe 2012 will turn out to be the year that recognizes the importance and valuable contributions that sports have made on the lives of British Columbians.

The results for the 2012 Lieutenant-Governor’s competition will be announced at the BC Historical Federation Annual Conference, on Saturday, May 11, 2013.

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The following is an off-shoot project resulting from the Harry Manson story that appears in my book. The following letter has been sent to 7 federal, provincial and civic leaders:

Dear Madam/Sir,

My name is Robert Janning and I live in the Downtown-Eastside of Vancouver. I write to you regarding Harry (Xul-si-malt) Manson, an outstanding First Nations athlete who I believe deserves formal recognition. I hope that you will consider providing supporting letters for his nomination to several sports halls of fame.

I became aware of Harry Manson several years ago when, as a part of my recovery from alcohol and substance abuse, I began to write a book on the history of British Columbia as seen through the lens of soccer. It was during the research for this project that I discovered Harry Manson’s story.

From 1897 to 1904, Harry Manson successfully captained his team, the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers, to victories that included winning the Nanaimo City Championship in 1904. In 1903, he was also one of three Wanderers selected to play on a Nanaimo all-star team that won the B.C. provincial championship. Together with his teammates Louis Martin and Joe Peters, Harry Manson thus became one of the first three indigenous players to win a provincial championship. Detailed information about Harry Manson and his sporting achievements accompany this letter.

Harry Manson and the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers played during a time when it was socially acceptable and commonplace to publicly disrespect and mistreat First Nations people. The enclosed contemporary newspaper account of a soccer match in Nanaimo in 1907 demonstrates the attitudes of the time. It was in this prevailing climate of racial intolerance that Harry Manson and his Snu-ney-muxw mates laced up their boots and took to the pitch. Their fortitude and courage in doing so is a reflection of their passion for the game.

Several years ago, I was able to contact Emmy Manson, the great-granddaughter of Harry Manson. As a result, I was invited to visit the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation reserve, where I met with a number of Harry Manson’s descendants and was shown the house where Harry lived and where he was buried. While gathered on Harry's grandson Gary's sundeck, overlooking the ocean at the mouth of the Nanaimo River, we exchanged stories and pictures of Harry. It was a pleasant and convivial occasion, but I was saddened when they shared an a copy of the Coroner's Inquiry report on the fatal accident that took Harry Manson's life in 1912. The report, housed at the B.C. Archives in Victoria, refers to this gifted athlete as "it" and "a drunken Indian," despite contrary evidence from a contemporary newspaper account (enclosed) and the family's account of Harry Manson as a loving and caring husband and father who died while on the way to Nanaimo to obtain medicine for his sick infant child.

As a talented athlete who became a British Columbia and Nanaimo soccer champion and also played first-base for the local Reliance Baseball Club, Harry Manson deserves to be remembered in a more respectful way than the words “it” and “drunken Indian” in a government report. I believe that his contributions as a person, a representative of the aboriginal community, and a Canadian sporting pioneer warrant official recognition. Accordingly, I would like to see Harry Manson inducted into one or more soccer or sports halls of fame. This would not only be a suitable tribute to the memory of Harry Manson, but would also serve as a source of inspiration for the aboriginal community and all British Columbians. Acknowledging the legacy of Harry Manson would also be an appropriate reflection of Canadian values of inclusivity and diversity.

I recently received the Manson family’s blessing to nominate Harry Manson for induction into the following four institutions:

Nanaimo Sports Hall of Fame (Nanaimo, B.C.)

British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame (Vancouver, B.C.)

Soccer Hall of Fame and Museum (Vaughan, Ontario)

Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame (Calgary, Alberta)

In each case, if the nomination is successful, Harry Manson will become the first aboriginal athlete inducted into each of these institutions.

I would therefore like to respectfully request that you provide four letters, one to each of the halls listed above, in support of the nomination of Harry Manson. These letters can be mailed to me at the address below, or alternatively, sent as email attachments. Each letter will appear at the front of an individually printed and bound presentation to be submitted to each of the nominating committees.

Thank you for your attention. I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

Robert Janning

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A brief update.

My book finished out of the top 6 books in the 2012 British Columbia Historical Writing contest. A complete list of entries can be viewed at:

http://bchistory.ca/awards/book/Entries2012.pdf

I received at nice letter from Premier Christy Clark in the mail, with regards to Harry Manson.

I have also received an invitation to meet with Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson on May 2nd. Who knows where that may lead to?

There are two requests that have been acknowleged. These are currently works in progress.

I just returned from Nanaimo, where I had a meeting with two members of the Manson family.

It has been an very interesting experience thus far.

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I just returned from Nanaimo, where I had a meeting with two members of the Manson family.

This, taken out of context of course, made me smile.

Congratulations Robert. It's good to see your work being recognized.

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I had a 45-minute meeting with Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson today. He was very interested in Harry Manson's story and said that he would write a letter in support of his induction into the various soccer and sports halls of fame.

I have also exchanged several emails with Mr. Roger Barnes, the president of the British Columbia Soccer Association. He has also expressed an interest in support of formally recognizing Harry Manson, but thought it would be appropriate to first consult with elders of the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation to see if the proposal meets with their approval. Subsequently, I have sent the following correspondence to the Snu-ney-muxw Chief and Council:

April 25, 2013

Vancouver, B.C.

Honourable Chief and Councillors,

My name is Robert Janning and I live in the Downtown-Eastside of Vancouver. I write to you regarding Harry Xul-si-malt Manson, an outstanding Snu-ney-muxw First Nation athlete who I believe deserves formal recognition. I presented this idea to Mr. Roger Barnes, the president of the British Columbia Soccer Association, and it was mutually agreed that it would be appropriate to first consult with you and the elders of the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation to see if this proposal meets with your approval. I hope that you will consider providing a letter of support for his nomination to several sports halls of fame.

I became aware of Harry Manson several years ago when, as a part of my recovery from alcohol and substance abuse, I began to write a book on the history of British Columbia, as seen through the lens of soccer. It was during the research for this project that I discovered Harry Manson’s story.

There were numerous highlights from 1897 to 1904 that made Harry Manson’s career truly unique, as he was the only player during that time to compete for all three of Nanaimo’s preeminent soccer teams:

Throughout this period, Harry Manson captained a team comprised exclusively of players from the Nanaimo Indian Reserve. On April 2, 1898, two Snu-ney-muxw players, Harry Manson and James Wilks, became the first aboriginal players to compete in a British Columbia championship match, when they were recruited into the Nanaimo Thistles line-up. Despite the fact that it took Harry Manson only five minutes to open the scoring, the Thistles ended up losing the intermediate provincial championship to the Victoria YMCA.

In 1899, the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers became the first aboriginal team to compete for a British Columbia championship. In what went on to become one of the most bitterly contested series recorded in the annals of provincial soccer, the Wanders lost a closely contested and controversial five-game series against their cross-town rivals, the Nanaimo Thistles.

By the time the 1902-03 season rolled along, eight long years had passed since the last Nanaimo club had won the senior provincial championship. It was therefore no surprise that enthusiasts in the Coal City were determined to recapture the trophy they had donated to the British Columbia Football Association, when this organization was formed in 1891. During Nanaimo’s prolonged cup-drought it became abundantly clear that the only way to defeat Esquimalt and Victoria clubs would be to form a team comprised of the best players from the Nanaimo Association Football League, in essence a Nanaimo all-star team.

Harry Manson was one of three Wanderers selected to play for the Nanaimo Association Football Team that won the senior British Columbia championship. Together with his teammates Louis Martin and Joe Peters, Harry Manson thus became one of the first three indigenous players to win a provincial championship.

Sadly, it appears that the contemporary law, which prohibited the sales of alcohol to Indians, may have been the excuse used for not inviting the three Snu-ney-muxw players to the victory party that held at the Wilson Hotel, one week later.

Ultimately, Harry Manson and the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers were not to be denied their moment of glory, as the following season they went on to achieve their greatest triumph by capturing the 1904 Nanaimo city championship.

Harry Manson’s tragic death in 1912 was front page news for both contemporary newspapers, the Nanaimo Free Press and the Nanaimo Herald. These articles disclosed the following:

“Harry Manson was well known to football enthusiasts in the district, having been a member of the Indian team, which made quite a reputation some few years back. He was also on the Nanaimo Uniteds when they won the B. C. challenge cup, which they held ever since.”

“Harry Manson was probably the best known of the Nanaimo Indians, (who) for many years played on the local senior soccer teams and was one of the best players Nanaimo has produced.”

Harry Manson and the Nanaimo Indian Wanderers played during a time when it was socially accepted and commonplace to publicly disrespect and mistreat First Nations people. The enclosed contemporary newspaper account of a soccer match in Nanaimo in 1907 demonstrates the attitudes of the time. It was in this prevailing climate of racial intolerance that Harry Manson and his Snu-ney-muxw mates laced up their boots and took to the pitch. Their fortitude and courage in doing so is a reflection of their passion for the game.

Several years ago, I was able to contact Emmy Manson, the great-granddaughter of Harry Manson. As a result, I was invited to visit the Snu-ney-muxw First Nation reserve, where I met with a number of Harry Manson’s descendants and was shown the house where Harry lived and where he was buried. While gathered on Harry’s grandson Gary’s sundeck, overlooking the ocean at the mouth of the Nanaimo River, we exchanged stories and pictures of Harry. It was a pleasant and convivial occasion, but I was saddened when they shared a copy of the Coroner’s Inquiry report on the fatal accident that took Harry Manson’s life in 1912. The report, housed at the B.C. Archives in Victoria, refers to this gifted athlete as “it” and “a drunken Indian,” despite contrary evidence from a contemporary newspaper account (enclosed) and the family’s account of Harry Manson as a loving and caring husband and father who died while returning from Nanaimo after having obtained medicine for Adam, his sick infant child.

As a talented athlete who became a British Columbia and Nanaimo soccer champion and also played first-base for the local Reliance Baseball Club, Harry Manson deserves to be remembered in a more respectful way than the words “it” and “drunken Indian” in a government report. I believe that his contributions as a person, a representative of the aboriginal community, and a Canadian sporting pioneer warrant official recognition. Accordingly, I would like to see Harry Manson inducted into one or more soccer or sports halls of fame. This would not only be a suitable tribute to the memory of Harry Manson, but would also serve as a source of inspiration for the aboriginal community and all British Columbians. Acknowledging the legacy of Harry Manson would also be an appropriate reflection of Canadian values of inclusivity and diversity.

I recently received the Manson family’s blessing to nominate Harry Manson for induction into the following four institutions:

* Nanaimo Sports Hall of Fame – Nanaimo, BC

* British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame – Vancouver, BC

* Soccer Hall of Fame & Museum – Vaughan, ON

* Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame – Calgary, AB

I would therefore like to respectfully request that you provide a letter in support of the nomination of Harry Manson. This letter can be mailed to me at the address below, or alternatively, sent as an email attachment.

Thank you for your attention. I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

Robert Janning

post-840-13946525486_thumb.jpg

Edited by Robert

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    Join us for this historic game!

    The Voyageurs are inviting all fans of the game who want to be at this historic match to join us. 

    We have arranged with Forge's James Hutton to set up a section at the game.

    After we will be joining a post game inaugural CanPL party hosted by the Barton Street Battalion 

    Please join and share the Facebook event here. Let's spread the word and make this a great day.

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